#1
I have a bunch of musician friends and been talking to them. A lot of them are amateurs, and of course they don't have much money. Anyway, I know that a lot of them wants to make a demo CD or just record themselves. Any doing it in a professional recording studio just cost way too much.

I got a mobilepre and a sm57 and been playing around of recording myself since I recently picked up guitar.

Anyways, I thought of the idea of setup a cheap/free recording studio at my place. I recently bought a foreclosure and been fixing it up. I also picked up a used condenser mic, Rode NT1A. I thought to myself I can start an amateur recording studio if I can semi-sound proof the room.

I was wondering if anyone has done this as a small business. I want to sound proof, but leave the ambient studio reverb. Is there a good resource that teach how to do that? What about sound editing and mastering? Is it all just play and see or are there something like a textbooks or tutorial?
#2
wow, i dont know, search on the internet, it's a wonderful idea man, i wish i could have the money to do it myself
#3
dude.. that's exactly what i want to do sometime. go for it
My Guitars:
Gibson Les Paul Studio
Epiphone AJ
Ibanez Strat Copy

Amps:
Orange Tiny Terror Head
Old beaten up Peavey cab
Marshall MG30DFX
#4
Quote by d1sturbanc3
I have a bunch of musician friends and been talking to them. A lot of them are amateurs, and of course they don't have much money. Anyway, I know that a lot of them wants to make a demo CD or just record themselves. Any doing it in a professional recording studio just cost way too much.

I got a mobilepre and a sm57 and been playing around of recording myself since I recently picked up guitar.

Anyways, I thought of the idea of setup a cheap/free recording studio at my place. I recently bought a foreclosure and been fixing it up. I also picked up a used condenser mic, Rode NT1A. I thought to myself I can start an amateur recording studio if I can semi-sound proof the room.

I was wondering if anyone has done this as a small business. I want to sound proof, but leave the ambient studio reverb. Is there a good resource that teach how to do that? What about sound editing and mastering? Is it all just play and see or are there something like a textbooks or tutorial?


check riffs and recording for advice. just an fyi though, i just spent $7k on gear and still have to get more stuff so its not cheap.
#6
Quote by z4twenny
check riffs and recording for advice. just an fyi though, i just spent $7k on gear and still have to get more stuff so its not cheap.


Did you buy all new stuff? I wonder if the money spent are recoverable. Reading through the guides, I'm beginning to think I should focus on a mobile recording platform. I'm not going to worry about drums right now. I can support keyboard, guitar, and vocals.

I think I'm going to focus service on live recording or on site. I don't know how to get into it though.

How did you learn to master? Trail and error?
Last edited by d1sturbanc3 at Aug 3, 2009,
#7
^ yup i bought all new stuff and i just got the basics, input, preamps, mixing monitors and headphones and a couple good mic's (i already had the pc)

im not sure what you meant by "how did you learn to master" im wondering if you meant mixing.... anyways, that was just practicing, alot.
#9
Wow.... SO much to learn, and SUCH a steep learning curve and SO much money involved.

First - soundproofing. The best resource on the entire www, bar none, is a site done by a guy named John Sayers. He designs and builds studios starting at about $100 000 and anywhere up from there. Even jut looking at his projects is both daunting and inspiring. He knows his stuff. On that site, there is a forum where he frequents.

That forum is also regularly frequented by a guy named Rod Gervais who wrote the bible on building home recording studios, called "Home Recording Studio - Build it like the Pros." I have it. It is an excellent resource - a 'must have' IMHO.

There are lots of other really knowledgeable people there too. Check www.johnlsayers.com.

A few things to be aware of:
-there is no such thing as 'poor man's soundproofing.' Do it right, and be prepared to spend $$$, or don't do it at all.
-room treatment is related to, but an entirely different study and application from sound proofing. The Sayers forum and the Gervais book have a TON of info on that too. Again...not cheap.

Part of why pro studios are expensive is the gear, yes. Most pro studios have more money invested in construction than they do in gear, I would bet, though.

Recording:

Think of recording as learning another instrument. How long does it take to get good? Sure, you might think you're pretty good after a year or two of playing, but when you look back after five years.... ten years.... you realize how 'not as good as you thought you were' you really were. Recording is the same. Just because you have a Marshall Stack and a Les Paul doesn't mean you're going to be a great player, or even a good one.

Along with investing time comes investing money. Sure, you can make very usable recordings with entry level gear. I have. Our album was done at my place. But when you get into the world of pro audio, there really is a reason why some of that stuff costs what it does. It costs money to get great sound. I have an NT1 similar to yours. You can make really good recordings with it. But does it stand up to a U87 at 10x the price? Erm.... no.

Never underestimate the importance of proper monitors. Your stereo speakers will not get you where you want to go.

Mastering: Is a whole other art again. Sure, it is related to mixing, but is really a skill set all its own. Most pro studios send their stuff out to get mastered by pro mastering engineers. There are some very good reasons for that.

The riffs and recordings forum here is a good start, but really, there isn't *anyone* here that I know of that will get you the advice you need at a more advanced level. For a beginner, where you're at now - it represents a great start.

From there, check out:
www.homerecording.com/bbs and www.recordingproject.com

Home Recording is a bigger site. The plus side of that is you get more people, and with more people comes a wider knoweldge base and more points of view. The down side of that is that it is prone to flame wars etc from time to time. Recordingproject is smaller and quieter, but easier to get to know people. Both sites have very knowledgeable people, and many of the people at recordingproject are also at homerecording. BlueBear runs a pro studio in Ottawa, and has written articles that I have often seen cited as a reference here in the Riffs and Recordings forum.

Piplelineaudio is a pro mastering engineer with a pro mastering studio. He is a guru in that field, and has worked with Sheryl Crow, Megadeth, Gin Blossoms, etc.
. Harvey Gerst has designed microphones for major manufacturers and has recorded groups like Jefferson Airplane and stuff.

Once you're fluent there, you can investigate resources like the usenet rec.pro.audio and the forums at prosoundweb. Be careful in those places, though. They are pro forums, and newbies who don't know much are often brought down a peg or two if they come on sounding like they know more than they do. If you don't know your stuff, you'll get owned very quickly. But at those places you get guys like Scott Dorsey (engineer for CBC, writes pro sound articles for a couple of different magazines), Steve Albini (Chemical sound, recorded Nirvana's In Utero) etc. These people know their stuff. They'll also coach you on the differences between how a LA2A handles harmonic overtones differently from an 1176. They're not really excited about answering questions about your Presonus gear.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#10
You don't have to spend a lot to get started and record some demos, but generally if you spend more you get more. A huge factor in a recordings 'quality' is your skill at recording, not just the gear.

www.tweakheadz.com has guide for getting your head around the basics of recording. It also has a heap of different ideas for home studios on any budget.
My name is Andy
Quote by MudMartin
Only looking at music as math and theory, is like only looking at the love of your life as flesh and bone.

Swinging to the rhythm of the New World Order,
Counting bodies like sheep to the rhythm of the war drums
#12
Quote by axemanchris
A few things to be aware of:
-there is no such thing as 'poor man's soundproofing.' Do it right, and be prepared to spend $$$, or don't do it at all.
-room treatment is related to, but an entirely different study and application from sound proofing. The Sayers forum and the Gervais book have a TON of info on that too. Again...not cheap.
^+1

a room's reverb is not the same as soundproofing. It has to do with the reflection of sound inside the room. This is what chris refers to above as room treatment.

Soundproofing is required to stop unwanted outside noise getting in such as a truck driving past and ruining the one pristine vocal track you managed to totally nail after 43 takes.

You ask if any of the cost is recoverable.

Visit your local bank. Ask to speak to someone with expertise in assisting small businesses. Ask how they would set things up. Ask if they have any information on structuring a small business. Ask them to refer a local accountant. Read the information, do some research, compile a list of questions, visit a recommended accountant and have them answer you questions.

The accountant will probably charge but if they are any good they will save you that money back and prevent any hassles later on. The materials might not be deductable as they aren't expenses. The business will retain them as an asset in the form of a valuable studio set up. The mics and cables and computer are also business assets but they and other other business assets including fixtures / chattels may depreciate over time and that might be considered a legitimate business expense. The space in your house occupied will be rented out to the business which might offset a small part of your home loan interest costs. The electricity used in each recording session will be a business expense. The accountant's fees will also be deductible.

These might be some of the things you discuss with your accountant. They will also factor into how you price (what you charger per hour).

Best of Luck. Sounds exciting.
Si
#14
yea I have to build up enough capital for that kind of business. But I think I'm going to start with on location/live recording, mixing, and mastering. I think there is a market for that. It would be cheaper to start since I think I can afford all the necessary hardware.

I still need couple of mics and monitors.

Home studio is going to take couple of years to build up enough capital. It might be worth just buying a piece of land and designing a new building.
#15
Quote by 20Tigers
such as a truck driving past and ruining the one pristine vocal track you managed to totally nail after 43 takes.

you must've been standing outside when i screamed. and actually it was about 90 some odd takes

but basically what 20 tigers and axemanchris said. its really all about what kind of quality you're trying to get out of your recordings. ideally if you think about it, some of the best albums ever were recorded with less than modern standards. pretty hate machine was recorded on one of the first audio rigs ever, your cell phone probably has a faster processor than his computer did at the time. and albums like "master of puppets" and "the wall" were recorded reel to reel with obviously good equipment, but none of the special FX to clean it up or make editing easier.
Last edited by z4twenny at Aug 4, 2009,
#16
Quote by d1sturbanc3
yea I have to build up enough capital for that kind of business. But I think I'm going to start with on location/live recording, mixing, and mastering. I think there is a market for that. It would be cheaper to start since I think I can afford all the necessary hardware.

I still need couple of mics and monitors.

Home studio is going to take couple of years to build up enough capital. It might be worth just buying a piece of land and designing a new building.


You ARE onto something there. As much as pro studios all over the world are closing their doors, there most definitely IS a niche market in location recording. I run a project studio out of my house, and we recorded a live show where I packed up my rig and recorded.... but I'm really not excited about doing that again. It was a b!tch. Even though I have my own gear, I would sooner pay someone else to bring theirs. Mine is not conveniently portable by any means. I'm sure I'm not alone in that.

You will need a mix room at a permanent location, so get a great set of monitors and some good software and/or outboard gear for that.

Outside of that, your best friend will be a nice rack-mounted computer, a flat-screen monitor, a rackmounted all-in-one interface with preamps, and some well chosen mics. Remember, with mics it is very much a story of "different tools for different jobs."

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#17
You need money!
My PA system for live use, is lots of money and im not even done yet. Not subs added yet. Already over a grand
-PV14 Mixer
-Crown XTI 1000 Amp
-Two PR15 mains
-Shure SM58
-Dbx compressor/gate
#18
Is there a definintive article or sticky on home recording?

It would be helpful if someone covered these areas;
- Equipment
- Soundproofing
- Recording
- Mixing
- Mastering
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#19
A grand for a PA system..... that's nothin.

A good practice PA for rehearsals can run you that much.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#20
^ oh yeah easily, i spent that much on a mic.

Quote by AlanHB
Is there a definintive article or sticky on home recording?

It would be helpful if someone covered these areas;
- Equipment
- Soundproofing
- Recording
- Mixing
- Mastering

that stuffs in riffs and recording
Last edited by z4twenny at Aug 4, 2009,
#21
Quote by z4twenny
that stuffs in riffs and recording


Cheers mate.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#22
Yeah, what started off as career advice and where to obtain information (which I had no problem with here) has really involved into concerns better addressed in the Riffs and Recordings forum.

Please go there with further questions about gear, techniques, etc.

https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/forumdisplay.php?f=40

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.