#1
Hello I have a couple guitar designs I designed my self they are way to small on my comp, I am wondering if anyone knows a place that I can get them scaled up to size at, I figure that since I have pickups drawn in on it you could scale up the pickup first then scale the rest up off of that.
#2
Microsoft Paint.

All you really need to do is print whatever size you have it in now and measure the scale length with a micrometer. Do the conversion to make it 24"-25.5" or whatever scale length and go into the Sketch/Skew menu. All you have to do is put the factor that it needs to be multiplied by to become the full size as a percentage. Simply multiply the factor by 100.
#3
Quote by ohspyro89
Microsoft Paint.

All you really need to do is print whatever size you have it in now and measure the scale length with a micrometer. Do the conversion to make it 24"-25.5" or whatever scale length and go into the Sketch/Skew menu. All you have to do is put the factor that it needs to be multiplied by to become the full size as a percentage. Simply multiply the factor by 100.



I don't have a micrometer, and there is nothing as acurate that is affordable.
#4
Quote by ohspyro89
Microsoft Paint.

All you really need to do is print whatever size you have it in now and measure the scale length with a micrometer. Do the conversion to make it 24"-25.5" or whatever scale length and go into the Sketch/Skew menu. All you have to do is put the factor that it needs to be multiplied by to become the full size as a percentage. Simply multiply the factor by 100.



And how do I do that conversion? I suck at math.

Any chance you could do the math for me if I send you the guitar design?

If you don't have a micrometer you could use a 6 inch rule or another type of rule.
#5
You can find a micrometer for around 15-20 bucks if you look on E-Bay.

The conversion is simple, and no I will not do it for you, you should learn it!

Just think of fractions, it's simpler to write on paper so grab a pencil and paper. All this is will be a simple multiplication.

What you'll want to work off of is your scale length, it'd be the easiest to measure with a micrometer. Now say you've got your small picture, and you measure from the nut to the saddle (the scale length) and it comes out to... say 0.75" for easy numbers.

So you take your two numbers that you have so far.
Scale length=24
Picture length= 0.75

Since you are enlarging the picture length, you set up a single variable algebra equation. Z will be the variable.

So this is what it'd look like

Picture length X Magnification Factor= Scale Length
0.75 x Z = 25

If you solve for Z, you get the equation...
Z=25/0.75

Now you can easily substitute this for any scale length and such. Just replace those numbers with other applicable numbers.

It's easier if you look at it like this.

Factor of Magnification = Desired Scale Length / Measure Scale Length

That'll give you a factor to multiply by. Since MS Paint works in percentage though, you must account for that.

It's fairly simple.

1=100%
So it can be said that 4=400% and so on.

So to get the number you would input, multiply your factor of magnification by 100. That's the number you would put in the Sketch/Skew boxes.
#6
I don't quite get how I get Z, How do I find the magnification value in other words. If I use a 6 inch rule could I not just take what I get and convert it to a decimal? then use the decimal in the way you have. say I got 4 and 17/32, its not as accurate as a mic but why wouldn't it work?
Last edited by †SDMF† at Aug 18, 2009,
#10
Quote by willT08
Who knew guitarists could do maths?


Well, I'm a Mechanical Engineer Major. I better be able to do some math.

I can tell you a bunch of other useless stuff too. Like the area under a curve on a graph. Plus, if you give me a position function (feet per second), I can tell you acceleration, and velocity. It's a snap, a lot easier than you'd think.

Right now, I am taking Statics. It's the study of loads basically. So eventually, I may be able to calculate the amount of tension certain woods and materials can take. Not sure when in the hell I'll use it, but the professor said it's the hardest class to date that any of us had taken. We have already taken Calc 1 and 2....

Sorry for the story, but did you get that picture working right TS?