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#1
Which should I learn if I'm planning to be a guitarist in the future... Jazz,Blues, or Classical? Right now I'm self taught, I know basic things, I can read treble and bass clef because of piano, I know basic theory, I only know A major pentatonic scale on guitar, I read tabs , I don't really know the notes on the fret board, I play bass also, I play metal mostly, I'm really into music, I have fairly good practical skills on guitar as I have experience, but I do not have much theory, I have never really took lessons. I want to get technical!

I have only 2 years left of high school ;( so I'm not really sure where to go... I'm thinking about getting into a band but I'm also open to other things. I'm not sure what I can accomplish in 2 years. I've been playing since grade 6 I'm going into grade 11 this year. Sorry guys I'm sorta lost still, I really could use some guides.

I practice 1 hour at least usually per day and can go to a maximum of... 15 hours but... realistically I go to 10 hours per day max (usually weekends or summer), I really can't imagine doing anything besides guitar. I want to go to musician's institute or something similar. I live in Canada.

Yeah if anyone has had these questions or feelings before please share your opinion on these. Is it too late? Am I at the wrong place at the wrong time? Am I not good enough? Anything would help guys, please hear me out!
#2
sounds like youre on the right track. if you want to become a professional musician, as it seems, id start trying to find your niche. find the type of music youre most comfortable with. start learning some more technical aspects of playing (say, scales, some advanced theory, left/right hand techniques, etc). its not necessary to be in a band, however, the experience of being in one may be useful. as long as youre dedicated enough you'll go far.
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Quote by freedoms_stain
I can't imagine anything worse than shagging to Mark Knopfler.

Maybe shagging Mark Knopfler, but that's about it.
#4
Thanks TK1 that helps! at least I know now that I have an idea of where to go. I'm still wondering if I have enough time though... 2 years before highschool is over, It's quite fast and pressuring!
#5
Quote by Grindguitar
That is absoloutly ridiculous.Up to 15 hours a day?Don't be so bloody stupid.


Thats just once in a blue moon when I have the capacity to play that much, and when I have nothing else to do. I'm not saying I do it often, but I'm not saying it doesn't happen... 10 hours is the usually if I want to have the *all day* practice session.
#6
The only thing ten hours will give you that three hours won't is RSI.
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
Theory is descriptive, not prescriptive.


Quote by MiKe Hendryckz
theory states 1+1=2 sometimes in music 1+1=3.
#8
Repetitive strain injury.
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
Theory is descriptive, not prescriptive.


Quote by MiKe Hendryckz
theory states 1+1=2 sometimes in music 1+1=3.
#9
You don't need to practice 24/7 to get good. Practice in small, concentrated amounts of time. Don't forget to have fun too...
#10
Yeah, 3-4 hours is plenty of time for either practice or a jam session, if not both.
The longest I played was 6 hours and that was an awesome jam session with my brothers.
If you're not feeling it, then stop. Probably for a couple days too. Sort out you're priorities and make sure that you're playing music because you enjoy it.
#11
Play what you want to play, what you love to listen to, not what will make you a "Better" guitarist. Play as much as you want as long as it's consistent. Don't do 5 hours one day and 20 minutes another day. Do something regular.


Enjoy it, as well.
#12
It's not too late, but you'll have to work like a dog to do it.

What exactly do you want to do? Yeah, you want to be a guitarist, but do you have anything more specific in mind?

I was in a similar boat when I was entering grade 12. (We still had grade 13 then in Ontario). With two years left of high school, when I was once pretty sure I either wanted to be an engineer or an accountant, I said, "I want to be a musician.... maybe a music teacher in a school or something." I also wanted to continue to develop my chops in the event that I'd be lucky enough to latch onto a project that got signed.

In order to study music in a formal academic setting, you typically need to go classical or jazz. Being a fan of guys like Malmsteen (this was 1987) and Randy Rhodes and stuff, I went the classical route. It took me two years to get up to playing grade 7/8 Royal Conservatory classical pieces well enough that I got permission of the department to take music courses otherwise open only to music majors. I spent another year working like a dog and auditioned and got in, playing grade 8-10 classical pieces. It's possible, for sure, but a tall order.

A huge part of my success in that was latching onto the right teacher who was not only able to teach me what I needed, but who was also able to have me progress through those stages as quickly as I needed to. You can bet I paid a bit of a premium to study with such a person. That's part of it too.

However, depending on how you answer my question, this might not be the best path for you. I'll wait further for your response.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#13
It's hard to say exactly what I want to do... but it might sound like just a childish dream. I don't care whether I make a lot of money or not, I just want to have fun. I want to be a guitar hero (not the game) like Paul Gilbert or Alexi Laiho. I still want to make enough money to eat though, well most of the time being a musician I don't think I'd need an expensive house either. I like to travel and see places. Preferably in a band. Being in a band seems like a good experience. I like to play, but I don't mind if I don't become famous. Yeah... I'm not the richest person too so I'm worried about that too. I'm not really sure what I want to be though... I have the patience to become a music teacher... but it doesn't seem that interesting. I want something that is different everytime (almost) but keeping some basic routines. I'm still finding my way. I live in Ontario too! I wanted to become a scientist before heh! Seems like I could learn a lot from a guy like you!
#14
Hehe don't worry guys! part of the reason I play so long is because I lost track of time. Yeah... I'm not really consistent ;P depends on my mood. Yeah I've learned a bit from just playing what I like to play. But fact is I enjoy all types of music. It's like a book... written in different languages. Every language sorta thinks differently.
#15
I've def had some marathons like that... you'll be fine. it's a problem when you notice it, and if you're losing track of time, you didn't notice it (unless you blacked out).

i'd say focus on classical, as it lends itself well to studying theory. jazz does as well, but classical seems like a better place to start... more... structured (for lack of a better term). but don't just abandon the blues. it's all about feeling, and expressing those feelings through guitar is perhaps the most essential of all skills to aquire... so I suppose what I'm saying is draw on the best elements of all three.
#16
Quote by NecroticSoldier
Which should I learn if I'm planning to be a guitarist in the future... Jazz,Blues, or Classical? Right now I'm self taught, I know basic things, I can read treble and bass clef because of piano, I know basic theory, I only know A major pentatonic scale on guitar, I read tabs , I don't really know the notes on the fret board, I play bass also, I play metal mostly, I'm really into music, I have fairly good practical skills on guitar as I have experience, but I do not have much theory, I have never really took lessons. I want to get technical!

I have only 2 years left of high school ;( so I'm not really sure where to go... I'm thinking about getting into a band but I'm also open to other things. I'm not sure what I can accomplish in 2 years. I've been playing since grade 6 I'm going into grade 11 this year. Sorry guys I'm sorta lost still, I really could use some guides.

I practice 1 hour at least usually per day and can go to a maximum of... 15 hours but... realistically I go to 10 hours per day max (usually weekends or summer), I really can't imagine doing anything besides guitar. I want to go to musician's institute or something similar. I live in Canada.

Yeah if anyone has had these questions or feelings before please share your opinion on these. Is it too late? Am I at the wrong place at the wrong time? Am I not good enough? Anything would help guys, please hear me out!


According to you, these are the FACTS;

- Have been playing for 5 years
- Have been practicing 1 hour to 15 hours a day for this time
- Play mostly metal
- Only know the A major pentatonic

Time to get a teacher buddy.

You far, far behind on music theory - one scale in one key, probably only one position. That is inexcusable for the amount of time you claim to have played. This is especially concerning when the major pentatonic is rarely used in metal, if at all. It is a scale most commonly identified with country music. If you think you can only play this scale in this one key, you are incorrect. Hint: The shapes are movable.

Now this doesn't mean you necessarily are a "bad" guitarist, but it means that if I walk up to you with a guitar and say "lets jam a metal song in Cm" and start riffing up you will not be able to play along, despite metal being your primary genre. You then have to wonder what exactly you can do - well you can play the intros to lots of other band's songs right? Does anyone want to listen? Nope. Damn.

But don't worry, if UG were a guitarist, it probably would be you.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#17
Learn whatever you like to play.
Quote by UtBDan
this man hits the nail on the head.
#18
My teacher had two choices when he was in a band... he could either break free with originals and become famous, or start getting gigs on cruise ships.

He took the latter, because he knew that fame would bore him... playing the same songs over and over again.
The gigs on cruise ships let him explore the world, get paid, play music, eat and sleep for free and have fun!

His teacher was robert fripp, so he knew directly what a band situation would be like.

Perhaps make a band and find gigs on ships?
#19
Quote by Grindguitar
That is absoloutly ridiculous.Up to 15 hours a day?Don't be so bloody stupid.

my cousin at berklee studies 15-20 Hours a day
and spends 120000 Dollars for it is that stupid?

Hell (yes) NO!
"Black gives way to more black."




I have UG Black Style and I can barely read my signature.

Also, I like black.


~DawnwalkerALL HAIL COMRADE DAWNWALKER
#20
Here's a response I gave a while back to a very similar thread....

this from a 39-year old who was in your same shoes back many moons ago....

About being a musician:

I think if you have hopes of making a career in music, you'd best make that your plan. If you get a big fat record deal and get famous, then awesome. If not, you're still following the course you've planned for - to be a professional musician.

First: You have no pretenses of being a rock star. That's fine. Do you know what it's like to be a full-time musician? I mean... *really* know?

There can be really decent money in playing gigs. It's a tough road, though, full of balancing business with pleasure. Weddings and corporate gigs pay really well. You'll walk out of there with a few hundred in your pocket for only a few hours work. Problem is.... how many hours do you work in a week? Solution = hustle, hustle, hustle.... you've got to be out there pounding away to get those gigs.

Of course, weddings are generally only on weekends. If you're really, really, really lucky you can round out your week with corporate events. Problem#2 is..... you want to play Disturbed, not Neil Diamond. Solution = suck it up. Don't bite the hand that feeds. You know what side your bread is buttered on. Some people call it selling out. Professional musicians call it making a living. Smile and sing along.... "Sweeee-eeet Car-o-liiiine.... ba DA-ba-ba...." Sure, don't laugh all the way to the bank, but at least all the way to the grocery store. Geez.... that's still only a few gigs a week. Sounds sweet as a teenager, but eventually you have to take on the real world. "when you're an adult, it's no cliche.... it's the truth..." (go ahead... identify that quote... )

So how do you round it out....well.... If you go to school for music and get a classical background, you can open yourself up for solo/duo gigs outside of your wedding band for other functions, corporate events, etc. People will hire a classical guitarist for whatever. Since there's nobody to share the money with, you do okay. Of course.... still no Disturbed. You're still sucking it up playing some version of Hotel California 'by request' (or even not....) right along side your Sor, Tarrega, Dowland, etc. That gives you a couple more shows.... but you still need a 'real job' as an adult - that is, one that pays for rent/mortgage, food, car, etc.

The poverty line for a family of four in the USA (I'm not American either, but they provide a handy bench mark) is $21, 200. For an individual, it is $10 400. That's about a thousand a month... just to live above the poverty line. Another point of comparison... take an average city.... Cleveland Ohio. Rent for an average apartment seems to be about $600. Then food, phone, insurance, gas, hydro, internet, spending, etc. Yikes.

So wadda ya do? Well... you can rent yourself out to bands as a hired guy. Need a guitarist? I'm your guy! I'll do it for $XXX. Artistic freedom? Nope. Now you're totally selling your soul. More Sweet Caroline. Maybe some Shania Twain or Dwight Yokum. Maybe some Bob Seger and Tom Petty. Who knows, really? Of course, you have to be able to sit down and learn these tunes on very short notice, and know them well enough to gig on them with one rehearsal if you're lucky.

Of course, you can't always count on those. Take on a few students (remember that hustle thing?) to help round things out. So, now you're above the poverty line. You've got sporadic hours that seem to pretty reliably fill up your evenings and weekends, and see you working quite late. At least you get to sleep in. Or not. Because tomorrow you have to learn some Green Day and Blink 182 and U2 for a cover band on Friday, and you don't have all day because some kid is coming over at 4:30 for his lesson and another at 5:30, and then you have to eat and start getting ready to head out for your gigs. And then at some point, you have your OWN kids and family to work into that crazy schedule!! (of course, with the screwed up hours you keep, you may wind up being single for the rest of your natural life... "Wanna go on a date? How's Tuesday afternoon for you?"..... another career hazard!)

Still sound like fun? If it does, you have what it takes to be a professional musician. If it sounds pretty crappy, then..... keep music as a hobby. Or incorporate it into some other career path. (that's what I did....)

One thing I'll add here is that, here is what happens with pursuing a career "to fall back on" via the college route:

You meet tons of girls. You meet a girl that you like best out of all of them. (for me, it was a couple years after university, but whatevs) You finish school. Inevitably, you find yourself with a girl, a job ticket into a career, and a girl who wants to get married.... and so do you. And you have the means to make money and start enjoying things. So you take that job that you've worked hard to get.

Music really does become something that you do in your spare time. You still have to make it a priority, or else you will have no spare time in which to justify making music, and then it gets forgotten. If you make it a priority (and make sure your partner is supportive of your music), then you can make it work. Because you're not always going to have very much spare time - especially when kids come... unless you make time to do it.

I know all this seems light-years away, but it comes a heck of a lot faster than you think it will. Trust me.... I spent a few years laughing about someone who said, when I was 23, that "30 is just around the corner." And after what seemed like only a couple of years, it became eerily UNfunny.


About being a teacher:

My choice was to take music in university as a means towards a teaching job in the public school system. Careful, now... do NOT go into teaching unless you really feel called to do it. It will eat you alive otherwise. However, I get a good salary, a great pension, great benefits, holidays, etc... and best of all, I love my job. I'm NOT one of those people that others have described. Yes, it IS all about choices and taking charge of your own fate.

I just want to say again for the record...DO NOT GO INTO TEACHING UNLESS YOU REALLY WANT TO TEACH!! You haven't implied that you might, but some of the advice recently might be taken that way.

I'm a teacher. I love my job. But!! If you don't love it, it will eat you alive. You'll be happier at a desk somewhere selling insurance policies over the phone. The people who get into it for the wrong reasons often don't last long. Those that do are just eternally miserable.

It is a ridiculously demanding job. Demanding enough that if you don't *really* want to do it... you're screwed. Most days, I don't have time to eat lunch. That's the truth. Sit down at my desk?! Yeah, right. Dreamland!! The people who have no idea and look at it only for the $$ and holidays are often in for an awful surprise. Twelve years in, I still put in roughly a 50 hour work week.

"Hey, where's my 15 minute morning break?"

"You're kidding, right?"

"Uh.... oh.... okay, then."

The luxury I have now is that I get to make music on my terms... because I want to. I am in complete control of my musical activities, because I don't depend on it for a living.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#21
^^^what about music colleges (good ones)
"Black gives way to more black."




I have UG Black Style and I can barely read my signature.

Also, I like black.


~DawnwalkerALL HAIL COMRADE DAWNWALKER
#22
Quote by axemanchris

I spent a few years laughing about someone who said, when I was 23, that "30 is just around the corner." And after what seemed like only a couple of years, it became eerily UNfunny.


Man, I'm only 21 but that paragraph felt like it punched me in the gut, I seriously had a weird feeling inside me reading that one.

Time to seriously consider what I'm going to do next year after completing Cert 4 in Music this year..
#23
Quote by axemanchris
Depressing story





TS, I was in your shoes recently, and I hooked myself up with a guitar teacher and he's been helping me understand a load of theory. Practise scales, it really helps!

Get your pentatonic shapes down and learn scales (modes etc) It helped me loads.

Do that in your "15 hour practises"

... blues is useful too


Edit: PS, it's deffinately not too late!
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Quote by SEALSniper1152

If you take a jar, and whisper what you want to hate into it, then close the jar, coat it in crunchy peanut butter, and shove it up your ass. I'm pretty sure you could hate everything after that.
Last edited by PETERFKNPARKER at Aug 4, 2009,
#24
Quote by PETERFKNPARKER



TS, I was in your shoes recently, and I hooked myself up with a guitar teacher and he's been helping me understand a load of theory. Practise scales, it really helps!

Get your pentatonic shapes down and learn scales (modes etc) It helped me loads.

Do that in your "15 hour practises"

... blues is useful too


Edit: PS, it's deffinately not too late!


Eh... It's usually 10 ._." but I found out about repetitive strain injury... so I'll just stick with 5... Yeah scales helps ;D!
#25
To Axemanchris the quote is from "I'm an adult now" by The Pursuit of Happiness. I actually searched that up on google to tell you the truth as I never heard of the song before (sadly). It's funny because I went to a wedding the other day, these guys gigged it and it sounded really good, I complimented them. They looked like they had a lot of fun. I know it may be tough being a musician, everything else is tough in the world too. Like you said if you don't like teaching it will eat you alive. If you don't like music, then it too will eat you alive, that's why I choose to do it though, because I like it. I didn't plan on getting married or having a gf as I know you cannot tend to music the same way (depending on the situation) I cannot foresee that though because we all have emotions. The way you described it is exactly how I was taught it was going to be (if you don't get famous) and even if you do get famous it's still a LOT of hard work, you barely get any breaks I heard. I have... thought about incorporating it into another career, maybe a chef or farmer or something, maybe join the army or something. I'm not sure about the college route, I don't really know about it. The information you gave did help though. I will keep the thoughts in my head as I progress. I still have a lot to learn. Real life isn't going to be what I pictured, I know it won't be perfect, but it'd be something.
#26
Quote by AlanHB
According to you, these are the FACTS;

- Have been playing for 5 years
- Have been practicing 1 hour to 15 hours a day for this time
- Play mostly metal
- Only know the A major pentatonic

Time to get a teacher buddy.

You far, far behind on music theory - one scale in one key, probably only one position. That is inexcusable for the amount of time you claim to have played. This is especially concerning when the major pentatonic is rarely used in metal, if at all. It is a scale most commonly identified with country music. If you think you can only play this scale in this one key, you are incorrect. Hint: The shapes are movable.

Now this doesn't mean you necessarily are a "bad" guitarist, but it means that if I walk up to you with a guitar and say "lets jam a metal song in Cm" and start riffing up you will not be able to play along, despite metal being your primary genre. You then have to wonder what exactly you can do - well you can play the intros to lots of other band's songs right? Does anyone want to listen? Nope. Damn.

But don't worry, if UG were a guitarist, it probably would be you.


Yeah I really need a teacher... I know if I shifted the starting note on the A major pentatonic up then it would be Ab? so it would turn out to be an A minor pentatonic? and if I were to play it on a different position(like an octave higher I would need to move it 12 frets up and so on... I guess I only know really basic stuff. Yeah I started out pretty slow out of those 5 years as the beginning I didn't really take it that seriously, but after I got past the barrier it was fun ;D! and I liked to play it more. Yeah I know they use scales in a lot of songs, it's like the skeleton of it. Say... what's better? going to some guy who teaches guitar in his house somewhere? or going to like an actual sorta professional teaching place like RCM or perhaps maybe a local music store that offers lessons?
Last edited by NecroticSoldier at Aug 4, 2009,
#27
Quote by GrisKy
I've def had some marathons like that... you'll be fine. it's a problem when you notice it, and if you're losing track of time, you didn't notice it (unless you blacked out).

i'd say focus on classical, as it lends itself well to studying theory. jazz does as well, but classical seems like a better place to start... more... structured (for lack of a better term). but don't just abandon the blues. it's all about feeling, and expressing those feelings through guitar is perhaps the most essential of all skills to aquire... so I suppose what I'm saying is draw on the best elements of all three.


I agree with that. I enjoy classical, its very structured... but jazz DOES feel more free. Blues yeah, maybe that's why they call it the "Blues" because it's a lot more about feeling, but other styles still require feeling.
#28
Quote by ankthebank
My teacher had two choices when he was in a band... he could either break free with originals and become famous, or start getting gigs on cruise ships.

He took the latter, because he knew that fame would bore him... playing the same songs over and over again.
The gigs on cruise ships let him explore the world, get paid, play music, eat and sleep for free and have fun!

His teacher was robert fripp, so he knew directly what a band situation would be like.

Perhaps make a band and find gigs on ships?


Too bad LOL I get sea sick ;(. I'd rather go to weddings and stuff ;D! I'm a land lover!
#29
Quote by Dawnwalker
^^^what about music colleges (good ones)


What do you hope or expect from them?

They can range from an absolute necessary part of your path to an almost complete waste of time and money.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#30
Quote by NecroticSoldier
To Axemanchris the quote is from "I'm an adult now" by The Pursuit of Happiness.


You win a whole box of e-cookies! Pursuit of Happiness are awesome in so many ways.

Quote by NecroticSoldier

I didn't plan on getting married or having a gf as I know you cannot tend to music the same way (depending on the situation) I cannot foresee that though because we all have emotions.


Famous quote: Life is what happens when you're busy making other plans. Another Googler, perhaps....

Quote by NecroticSoldier

Real life isn't going to be what I pictured, I know it won't be perfect, but it'd be something.


But in the end it boils down to the choices you make and what you make of things.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#31
that's maybe one of the best responses I've ever seen posted (axeman's really long post, I mean).
Last edited by GrisKy at Aug 4, 2009,
#32
Quote by NecroticSoldier
Yeah I really need a teacher... I know if I shifted the starting note on the A major pentatonic up then it would be Ab? so it would turn out to be an A minor pentatonic? and if I were to play it on a different position(like an octave higher I would need to move it 12 frets up and so on... I guess I only know really basic stuff. Yeah I started out pretty slow out of those 5 years as the beginning I didn't really take it that seriously, but after I got past the barrier it was fun ;D! and I liked to play it more. Yeah I know they use scales in a lot of songs, it's like the skeleton of it. Say... what's better? going to some guy who teaches guitar in his house somewhere? or going to like an actual sorta professional teaching place like RCM or perhaps maybe a local music store that offers lessons?


Moving it UP would be Bb. Moving it DOWN would be Ab.

Minor is a whole other ball of wax that has nothing to do with relative positions on the neck.

As far as teachers go, if you're going to go the classical or jazz route (you're in the Toronto area, right?), is to contact the music department at a university known for their music program. University of Toronto would be an awesome place to start. Call their music department and find out who their instructors are and how to get in touch with them for lessons. Barring that, maybe find out who some of their top students are and how to pursue them for lessons. Chances are, you will study with those people at their homes or maybe even at the university in one of the practice rooms or something.

If you're going for a more generalist or pop/rock-based route, it becomes a little more nebulous. If I was in Toronto and looking for that, the first person I would hit up would be a guy named Pete Lesperance. He played with Harem Scarem and can shred with the best of them - Nuno included. If he doesn't teach, he could probably turn you towards someone who offers what you're looking for.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#33
Alright guys, I also plan on becoming a professional musician. Currently a senior in high school. I've been playing guitar for 4 years, piano for 9, bass for 3 I think, and tenor sax for about a year and a half. I also consider myself a fairly capable harmonica player. I'd like to think I know quite a bit about theory. I know my scales and arps inside and out, I have a pretty decent understanding of most types of harmonic movement, substitutions, alterations, extensions, etc. I absolutely plan on going the jazz route, though it won't kill me to play some rock tunes every once in a while, lol. I know I have a LONG way to go, but I'm not worried about getting "good" enough so much as I am about getting connected enough. How do you go about meeting the kind of people other people ask for a guitarist/bassist/pianist/whatever from? I'm absolutely fine with toiling in obscurity and doing odd gigs for enough to survive, but I want to be sure I can even do THAT. -_-
Last edited by grampastumpy at Aug 4, 2009,
#34
Howdy. I (try) to play guitar, any tips for learning. Bit of an open question. Any tips that dont include practcing for 5hours a day, and doing scales for months and monthson end. Tar
#35
^ Best start your own thread on that one.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#36
Quote by axemanchris
Moving it UP would be Bb. Moving it DOWN would be Ab.

Minor is a whole other ball of wax that has nothing to do with relative positions on the neck.

As far as teachers go, if you're going to go the classical or jazz route (you're in the Toronto area, right?), is to contact the music department at a university known for their music program. University of Toronto would be an awesome place to start. Call their music department and find out who their instructors are and how to get in touch with them for lessons. Barring that, maybe find out who some of their top students are and how to pursue them for lessons. Chances are, you will study with those people at their homes or maybe even at the university in one of the practice rooms or something.

If you're going for a more generalist or pop/rock-based route, it becomes a little more nebulous. If I was in Toronto and looking for that, the first person I would hit up would be a guy named Pete Lesperance. He played with Harem Scarem and can shred with the best of them - Nuno included. If he doesn't teach, he could probably turn you towards someone who offers what you're looking for.

CT


Ah I see my error! I was thinking differently from what I have said but I like the other info you added VERY helpful. Yes I am in the Toronto area... but I heard University music programs are different from something like a specialized one like Musician's Institute? I'll think about these 2, they both are awesome!
#37
Quote by axemanchris
You win a whole box of e-cookies! Pursuit of Happiness are awesome in so many ways.


Famous quote: Life is what happens when you're busy making other plans. Another Googler, perhaps....


But in the end it boils down to the choices you make and what you make of things.

CT


YAY COOKIES! ;D!!! I need G-Cookies for my guitar ;/ it's hungry! In fact... I broke it's string yesterday ;/ High e-string lame!

I favourited the music video on youtube, beginning to like the song, been singing along to it.

I remember that one... John Lennon ;P I'm pretty sure... My dad was a big fan of them, I watched some videos/documentaries of them and that's what he said...


Yes it does end up to the choices I make and what I make of things. That's true! It's also how hard I work, and my luck !
#38
Quote by NecroticSoldier
Ah I see my error! I was thinking differently from what I have said but I like the other info you added VERY helpful. Yes I am in the Toronto area... but I heard University music programs are different from something like a specialized one like Musician's Institute? I'll think about these 2, they both are awesome!


Again, it comes down to what you want out of it.

There are also significant differences among programs. If you go into music performance at U of T, your program will look different from someone taking music education, or music history and theory. They'll *all* look quite different, though they will share a certain number of the same courses.

If you want to be a classical musician, or if you want to go onto advanced study, like getting a masters, a doctorate, or even getting into teachers' college, you HAVE to go the university route.

If you simply want to be a better player, then a university degree is one way of getting there, but one of many paths.

A program at a place like MIT or Berklee, or even at a college like Humber or whatever will make you a better player. In fact, many great players come out of programs like that. Maybe better.... maybe not better than a performance degree at U of T, but the piece of paper you get at the end of a university degree is a lot more valuable.... if you actually need one for what it is you want to do. (although, from what I hear, Berklee seems to be making significant gains in credibility as an academic program in terms of how their accreditation is accepted among other institutions)

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#39
Quote by axemanchris
Again, it comes down to what you want out of it.

There are also significant differences among programs. If you go into music performance at U of T, your program will look different from someone taking music education, or music history and theory. They'll *all* look quite different, though they will share a certain number of the same courses.

If you want to be a classical musician, or if you want to go onto advanced study, like getting a masters, a doctorate, or even getting into teachers' college, you HAVE to go the university route.

If you simply want to be a better player, then a university degree is one way of getting there, but one of many paths.

A program at a place like MIT or Berklee, or even at a college like Humber or whatever will make you a better player. In fact, many great players come out of programs like that. Maybe better.... maybe not better than a performance degree at U of T, but the piece of paper you get at the end of a university degree is a lot more valuable.... if you actually need one for what it is you want to do. (although, from what I hear, Berklee seems to be making significant gains in credibility as an academic program in terms of how their accreditation is accepted among other institutions)

CT


@_@" also depends how much money I have ;( yeah... I guess it really does depend on how much money I have. There's a lot of options and a lot to think about ;( so I can't be so sure yet.
#40
Quote by NecroticSoldier
@_@" also depends how much money I have ;( yeah... I guess it really does depend on how much money I have. There's a lot of options and a lot to think about ;( so I can't be so sure yet.


I honestly think that you should not consider the professional musician path. After five years you haven't been inspired to learn scales, music theory or delve into other genres, and it will probably another five years until you are competent with them.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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