#1
hey, im not sure if this is the right place for this, but ya..

so ive recently been looking into learning about music theory and i found out how to construct major and minor scales and i dont understand what do i do with it. an example is this, the g major scale :G A B C D E F# G... so now what am i suppose to do with this scale after i make it? what does it do?? can somebody please enlighten me lol. ive been wondering about this for a couple weeks and thought id figure out along the way, but i still havent. after that i learned the the 7 positions of the major and minor scales and i understood that pretty well. then i learned how to construct chord progressions and im wondering what do i do after i construct one, like this. C - Dm - Em - F - G - Am - Bdim. does this mean that all 7 of these chords sound good together, in any way i play them? im not sure if this is the right place, but ya, please help me out lol
Last edited by Loldemonwar at Aug 3, 2009,
#2
The G Major scale starts on G... and has an F#. Go back and review your key signatures.

And your chord progression is just all of the chords in C Major. Usually you do a I, IV, V - style progression, like CM, FM, GM, but that's not very creative.
Last edited by deaththrashcore at Aug 3, 2009,
#3
Quote by Loldemonwar
hey, im not sure if this is the right place for this, but ya..

so ive recently been looking into learning about music theory and i found out how to construct major and minor scales and i dont understand what do i do with it. an example is this, the g major scale : F G A Bb C D E F ... so now what am i suppose to do with this scale after i make it? what does it do?? can somebody please enlighten me lol. ive been wondering about this for a couple weeks and thought id figure out along the way, but i still havent. after that i learned the the 7 positions of the major and minor scales and i understood that pretty well. then i learned how to construct chord progressions and im wondering what do i do after i construct one, like this. C - Dm - Em - F - G - Am - Bdim. does this mean that all 7 of these chords sound good together, in any way i play them? im not sure if this is the right place, but ya, please help me out lol


That's an F major scale. How did you come up with it? Because it's a perfectly fine F major scale, I'm just curious as to why you'd call it G. You don't 'use' scales in a sense that you play them. Scales are sets of notes. They tell you what notes are in a certain key.

As for the chords, those are all the diatonic chords in C major. You can use them in any order (even the one you have written), but you'll surely find some combinations you like more than others.

The best thing to do would be experiment! Play some chords, see what you like. Try playing some notes of a C major scale over a C major chord (or any other scale over its corresponding chord). Get used to the sound combinations you can make. Remember the ones you like, forget the ones you don't.
#4
Ok, well first off, that is the Fmajor scale/d minor scale. The G major sclae is G A B C D E F# G. Its obvious that you haven't really studied theory, no offense intended, so ill use as simple terms as i can. A scale is basically all the notes that sound "good" in a certain key. Im assuming you know that there are different keys. Once you have the different notes in a scale you use those notes to make a melody or solo or fill. If you look at the tabs for almost any song with a guitar solo, almost every single note will be in the major scale, or pentatonic to be more accurate but thats just a variation of the major scale. Those 7 chords are the different chords in the key of Cmajor. If you write down the notes in the C scale you will see that those notes are the same as the chord, or the root of each different chord. In theory, any way you play those chords they will sound good together because they are made up of notes in the scale. Although certain paterns may sound strange and the use of the Bdim will laso sound a little strange.
#5
Quote by Loldemonwar
hey, im not sure if this is the right place for this, but ya..

so ive recently been looking into learning about music theory and i found out how to construct major and minor scales and i dont understand what do i do with it. an example is this, the g major scale : F G A Bb C D E F ... so now what am i suppose to do with this scale after i make it? what does it do?? can somebody please enlighten me lol. ive been wondering about this for a couple weeks and thought id figure out along the way, but i still havent. after that i learned the the 7 positions of the major and minor scales and i understood that pretty well. then i learned how to construct chord progressions and im wondering what do i do after i construct one, like this. C - Dm - Em - F - G - Am - Bdim. does this mean that all 7 of these chords sound good together, in any way i play them? im not sure if this is the right place, but ya, please help me out lol


Ok, it's been pointed out that it's F maj scale, not G maj.

What do you do with a scale? You use it to make the sounds you want to make. knowing the notes involved is a good start, but to make the most out of a scale you need to know how the notes will sound in relation to each other. This means learning about intervals. Intervals are what make up scales, and chords. Learn about them and learn how to apply them.

You've learnt the 7 positions and you've understood them pretty well? To me that just means you've learnt 7 box patterns. Do you know why those patterns exist?

As for having learnt to constuct chord progressions; I don't think you have really learnt about constructing them if you aren't sure that whether those chords will sound good together.

I think you should step back and start from the beginning. Start with the intervals, and then apply them to the major scale, from there you can look at constructing chords from the major scale.

The crusade columns on this website will help you with this. (there's a link in my sig)
#6
I learnt/learning my music theory on keyboard and apply it to other instruments. The keys are my saviour when it comes to theory/composition...
#8
Quote by Loldemonwar
ah damn, copied and pasted the wrong thing lol, thought it would save time. ya, the G major scale, lets see. 2 2 1 2 2 2 1. so its G A B C D E F F# G. and then F# gets replaced by Gb. thanks a lot for replies guys, im still a little lost tho. ive been using these lessons, http://profile.ultimate-guitar.com/ZeGuitarist/contributions/ by the way


They're pretty good lessons. Do you understand why the major scale is 2 2 1 2 2 2 1?
#9
i think so, well..not really : (. lets see, another example. C major scale. theirs C, inbetween that their are 2 intervals so its C - D, another 2 intervals, C-D-E, 1 interval, C-D-E-F, 2 intervals, C-D-E-F-G,2 intervals, C-D-E-F-G-A-B-C. its because of the intervals, i think?
#10
Whole Step Whole Step Half Step Whole Step Whole Step Whole Step Half Step

2, 2, 1, 2, 2, 2, 1

2 is "2 frets" which is 1 Whole Step.
1 is "1 fret" which is 1 Half Step (or 1/2 a Whole Step)

There are notes on your guitar. This is why in Standard Tuning you have EADGBe.

E
A
D
G
B
e

Those are your strings on open (you are not fretting anything)

Now let's say you are to fret on Fret 1

F
A#
D#
G#
C
F

Now let's say on Fret 2
F#
B
E
A
C#
F#

And so on and so forth.

Now you have your C Major Scale:
C-D-E-F-G-A-B-C

That means you can play those notes on your guitar and be in the scale of C Major.

I suggest drawing a little diagram up to Fret 12 from open (an entire Octave) so you can see the notes of each fret. This may help you piece together everything.




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#11
*makes like a sponge*

Invokke_Havokk, that's the simplest way I've seen it put in writing thusfar. Thanks.
#12
Thank you, glad I could have helped.




Please add me if as a friend I helped! (I like to think I'm a friendly person)
#13
Quote by Loldemonwar
ah damn, copied and pasted the wrong thing lol, thought it would save time. ya, the G major scale, lets see. 2 2 1 2 2 2 1. so its G A B C D E F F# G. and then F# gets replaced by Gb.thanks a lot for replies guys, im still a little lost tho. ive been using these lessons, http://profile.ultimate-guitar.com/ZeGuitarist/contributions/ by the way

whoa whoa ok what are you up to here?
G major=
2 2 1 2 2 2 1=
GABCDEF#G

E to F is only one half-step, same as B to C.

Secondly, where did you get the notion that F# turns into Gb? You can only have one of each letter in a scale, anything else will be an accidental.

EDIT: and also on your post after that, you mistakenly say there are two "intervals" in between C-D, D-E, etc. There are two semitones in between them. One semitone= one fret. An interval is any amount of semitones in between two notes.

Ex: A-C# is a major third interval, as there are four semitones in between them.
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ZeGuitarist's sister is hawt.
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Last edited by Ribcage at Aug 17, 2009,