#1
Hey guys, Ive been playing for about 4 years. Not that Im into shred or anything really, but it would be nice to be able to play a little faster as that can always come in handy. Well anyways, I can play some pretty fast stuff, but that is only due to my technique, not the actual finger speed. Well just out of curiousity, I had a friend that just started learning guitar a couple weeks ago just do some simple repeated hammer on pull offs, something that is based solely on how fast your fingers can go and his fingers moved like twice as fast as mine... Anyways, should I just keep running through scales and stuff to speed up my fingers? My technique is pretty spot on, my finger speed is just lacking, thanks in advance for any help
#2
Speed in your fingers has alot to do with how relaxed your arm from the shoulder down is. Try relaxing more while playing.
Gear:
Bugera 6262 head
MXR M-108
Gibson Explorer faded
Harley Benton G212 Vintage
#3
^+1

Also try practicing chromatic runs in legato (hammer-ons and pull-offs)
like this:

1h2h3h4

4p3p2p1


And try stretching before playing to get your fingers relaxed.
I like metal

Gear (still working on it ) :

Epiphone SG G-310
Marshall MG10cd
Boss MT-2 Metal zone

Quote by DiSTuRBeD -26-
^listen to him


Metalli-freak
#4
Finger speed IS technique.

/thread
Actually called Mark!

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#6
It's true though, if your fingers can't move fast enough then your technique isn't great.

Speed isn't a skill, it's dependent on your skills...factors like accuracy, timing, fretboard knowledge, keeping hands synchronised, making your movements as economical as possible, keeping things controlled. If you can't play fast then it's not as simple as "you can't play fast"...the reason is one or all those things mentioned before are lacking. If you work on improving them, and they're all things you can actively practice and influence, then you'll be able to play faster.

There's no such thing as retarded or slow fingers, just badly trained ones.
Actually called Mark!

Quote by TNfootballfan62
People with a duck for their avatar always give good advice.

...it's a seagull

Quote by Dave_Mc
i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


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#7
Quote by steven seagull
It's true though, if your fingers can't move fast enough then your technique isn't great.

Speed isn't a skill, it's dependent on your skills...factors like accuracy, timing, fretboard knowledge, keeping hands synchronised, making your movements as economical as possible, keeping things controlled. If you can't play fast then it's not as simple as "you can't play fast"


how can one improve the skills you mentioned? Any exercises you have to offer?
I like metal

Gear (still working on it ) :

Epiphone SG G-310
Marshall MG10cd
Boss MT-2 Metal zone

Quote by DiSTuRBeD -26-
^listen to him


Metalli-freak
#8
Quote by steven seagull

There's no such thing as retarded or slow fingers, just badly trained ones.

or differently trained ones.
A lot of people just aren't trained to play super fast. I myself knew all the notes on the fretboard easy as can be in any position, but I hadn't trained my fingers to slide up the neck that fast or swap position. It wasn't accuracy that was lacking, but just an area in my technique I hadn't bothered to look at.

Now I have, and it's all good. Although, I still don't really like to go too fast. I liek to hear the impact of every note equally.
#9
^You don't 'train' to be fast anyway. Going fast isn't doing push-ups.

Seeing as though the TS wants to know how to do it your point about 'not training' yourself to go fast is silly. If he can't go fast he has poor technique.

Like Seagull person said:


Speed isn't a skill, it's dependent on your skills...


Which is basically the best one-liner you'll hear about playing fast.
Last edited by Ikonoklast at Aug 4, 2009,
#10
Run through some scales but move them down one or two frets and do a full run from the first fret all the way to the high end. Up and down, one end of the fretboard to the other. Do it to the point where you can do the full run without looking at your hands or missing a note. I find that sort of exercise helps with accuraccy and thus speed after a few weeks.
Andy Fox
Hard rock guitarist
I play a Jackson DK-2 and an Ibanez RG through a Peavey 6505+ stack