#1
Before you say it, I know that this seems like a stupid question... but there are literally thousands of websites offering theory lessons, and I don't have a clue where to start. Where do you recommend I look?

Also, getting lessons is not an option (at least for now).
Epiphone G-400
Roland Cube 30X
#2
College is the best way, IMO. You might get more useful theory nuggets out of teachers who entrench their theory teaching into your finger excersizes.

Then, college level theory books and absorbing and thinking about each and every note/pattern you see on a tab.
#4
Quote by Royal_Brick
Anyone else...?

Not really dude.

Your best bet is to either go with what whatshisface said up there, learning over the Internet can be a hassle. Information is all over the place, oversearchbarring a subject can seriously get you off track, and trust me, you will be googling the hell out of certain subjects. It's more efficient than just looking up tabs all day, and since lessons won't come for awhile, give it a shot. Might just be your cup of tea, sure as hell wasn't mine, but when the opportunity comes, get lessons.
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GODDAMMIT I need a G Decimator...
#5
in space

i did music at collage
i also get private theory lessons
starting a music degree next month
GEAR
94 Fender Stratocaster Plus
02 Gibson Les Paul Special (modded)
Orange AD-30 Combo


The SG Thread pwns your thread.
#7
When I took introductory theory in college a few years ago, we used this textbook:
http://www.amazon.com/Foundations-Music-CD-ROM-Robert-Nelson/dp/0534595561

It's a really good beginner's theory textbook imo. Explanations are clear and not overkilled like many other music textbooks. Seeing as how the used copys are going for like $1, you might want to buy one of them and read/practice it on your own. There were enough kids that passed the course without going to class by simply reading the book.

Don't get thrown off by the Amazon reviews. Most them are by idiots that are reviewing the Amazon service and not the textbook and the one review that is about the book, it seems like the guy didn't put any effort into reading it at all.
Last edited by JustKeepPlayn10 at Aug 4, 2009,
#8
Get a book definately, its much more handy than the websites (which are still good, don't get me wrong).

As you read it, take notes of whatever's important. Why? Writing things down helps you remember, and your notes make it easier than skimming through the book.
Breaking stereotypes by playing indie on a metal guitar.

Current Gear
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#9
I read the Crusade series by JoshUrban, that you can find the UG article section, to get started. ZeGuitarist also wrote a series of lessons for the article section. I din't get to read those, though.

Look those two up in the article section of UG, I'm sure they'll have enougn material to get you started. You will need to set out and take classes/read more extensive books to keep learning, but those articles are perfect to begin with.

Good luck
Last edited by Whiskky at Aug 4, 2009,
#11
Go piratebay GeetarPros5(fake name to hide real product)
and they have every scale there with fretboard diagramm ´n stuff

p.S:i was THAT stupid to actually BUY that program
(feels like buying Death Magnetic:Highly Anticipated,then WTF?!!?11)
"Black gives way to more black."




I have UG Black Style and I can barely read my signature.

Also, I like black.


~DawnwalkerALL HAIL COMRADE DAWNWALKER
#12
Quote by Dawnwalker
Go piratebay GeetarPros5(fake name to hide real product)
and they have every scale there with fretboard diagramm ´n stuff

p.S:i was THAT stupid to actually BUY that program
(feels like buying Death Magnetic:Highly Anticipated,then WTF?!!?11)



Or better yet, download TuxGuitar, the far superior free shareware version
Quote by mountain2012
I want a Fender because they are THE American rock sound. I'm proud to be an American.



Gear:
1981 Gibson Les Paul Firebrand

Mesa/Boogie DC-3
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Boss SD-1
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#14
I would really recommend lessons because when you learn off the internet, years later you realize you have huge gaping holes in your theory knowledge (like me... ) that really are not fun to correct.
Quote by mountain2012
I want a Fender because they are THE American rock sound. I'm proud to be an American.



Gear:
1981 Gibson Les Paul Firebrand

Mesa/Boogie DC-3
Dunlop Crybaby
Boss SD-1
Boss NS-2
Boss DD-7
EHX LPB-1