#1
What are good exercises to memorize the fretboard? Should I just sit down while going up and down the fretboard saying "oh this note is this note" and such... or is there a more effective method?
#2
I learned the patterns of notes between the strings. Pick a note, say "C," and find every C on the fretboard. Once you can do that easily move onto another note (non flats/sharps). It really improved my fretboard knowledge rather quickly.
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#3
learn one string at a time starting with low E. you only really need to learn up to the 12th fret too...
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#4
just know the notes...and the steps

it's seriously one of the easiest things to do
efgabcde....
etc etc
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#5
build scales by yourself... i'll explain

instead of playing patterns, build the scales, for example... take B in the 7th fret of the E string

you need to find B, C#. D#, E, F#, G# and A#

after you find every note on that position, change it, for example, start in F# on the 2nd fret of the E string

do that with different scales, that helped me a lot
#6
I don't really have it memorized, but, if you know your notes, it's not too terribly hard. I can name any note on any fret you give me within a matter of seconds, not having it memorized. I just do the math.

Like, okay, if someone points to the 7th fret on the E string (which is a B, btw), I go "Oh, well, E is the open note, plus seven. Hmm...F F# G G# A A# B. That's the seventh note. And then you think about it, and there's shortcuts you can take; like, in a standard tuning, on most strings, you tune to the fifth fret, so, the fifth fret is the same as the next string's open note. And, same goes for the seventh fret on most strings, it's an octave above the string above it (i.e. 7th fret on the A string is an E). Also, 12th and 24th frets are octaves, so, I'm not going to count 10 from the open E, I'll count 2 backwards.

In short, you can memorize it by doing the math.
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Last edited by HWFG1 at Aug 4, 2009,
#7
The notes run A through G. The order goes in this way -

A, Bb, B, C, Db, D, Eb, E, F, Gb, G.

That's the order, each starts on the like named string and follows that scheme. For example, if you start on 6th string (low e) on the third fret (G), then the order begins from there at G, then to Ab, A, B, C, Db, etc. When you hit the fret that's 12 above the first note, you start over with the same note, only it's an octave higher.
#10
go to this site


http://www.all-guitar-chords.com/guitar_scales.php

everything you need to know is there. NOW START PRACTICING!

enjoy
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#11
Quote by Perp8tualMotion
The notes run A through G. The order goes in this way -

A, Bb, B, C, Db, D, Eb, E, F, Gb, G.
.


I may be getting picky, but I disagree

It would be

A, A#, B, C, C#, D, D#, E, F, F#,G, G#, A

G back to A it would be

A, Bb, B, C, Db, D, Eb, E, F, Gb, G.

Either way, you were right, but not quite!
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Set sail to sea but pulled off course by the light of golden treasure --Hetfield, the Unforgiven Pirate

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Last edited by thedekker at Aug 4, 2009,
#12
Fretboard Warrior is a good program, just torrent it.
Church burning is good for the (social) environment

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It's like you take vodka, and then dilute it down until it's pretty much water, but still call it vodka, and proceed to pretend to get heavily wasted off it.
#13
One thing that hasn't been mentioned... While I'm practicing I will say the note/chord I'm playing out loud. I don't know why but that seems to help me .
#15
Quote by thedekker
I may be getting picky, but I disagree

It would be

A, A#, B, C, C#, D, D#, E, F, F#,G, G#, A

G back to A it would be

A, Bb, B, C, Db, D, Eb, E, F, Gb, G.

Either way, you were right, but not quite!


Ok to be technical I guess you are correct.

A# = Bb..........enharmonic notes...just in case anyone cares about the technical name.
#16
Quote by XxDethmetalxX
Fretboard Warrior is a good program, just torrent it.


i second that!!
#18
Quote by dma529
Not quite sure if this is the fretboard warrior everyone is recommending, but this has worked for me also:
http://www.francoisbrisson.com/fretboardwarrior//fretboard/fretboard.html

Yeah that;s it.
Church burning is good for the (social) environment

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Quote by theknuckster
It's like you take vodka, and then dilute it down until it's pretty much water, but still call it vodka, and proceed to pretend to get heavily wasted off it.
#19
Quote by thedekker
go to this site


http://www.all-guitar-chords.com/guitar_scales.php

everything you need to know is there. NOW START PRACTICING!

enjoy


thedekker, I have to thank you. I've only just started playing the guitar for about a month and am taking lessons. At my 4th lesson we just started with the pentatonic scales doing C at the 1st, 3rd and 5th fret. Doing those I've memorized where all the C positions are on the fret board and figured once I got F and G I'll be on my way to getting to know the whole board.

So I clicked on the link you provided and chose to see only all C notes and say to myself "hey I know all those C locations". I then clicked on the B note and noticed ALL the positions across the fret board move half step and that's when it hits me and realize the layout of everything. I know this is basic for all you seasoned guitarist but what a revelation it is for me as a beginner.

It's funny because I've looked at diagrams of the fret board with all the notes indicated a number of times but I guess with so much to look at it wasn't clear.
Last edited by Hab Fan at Aug 5, 2009,
#20
heres an easy method to knowing all the notes on the fretboard which requires minimal memorizing. first things first. the notes all have a flat or sharp between them except b-c and e-f . Therefore starting at a and naming the sharps it goes a a# b c c# d d# e f f# g g# a ... this is an endless loop so you can start at any note and continue up from that note. for example the bass string or sixth string is tuned to E when open therefore the notes going up are f 1st fret .. f# 2 nd fret... G 3rd fret... g# 4th fret... a 5th fret... a# 6th fret... B 7th fret...C 8th fret... c# 9th fret ... d 10th fret ... d# 11th fret ... and back to E at the octave 12th fret... this repeats itself beyond the 12th fret. Now you have to memorize the notes on the 6th string above. start with the whole notes which are frets 1,3,5,7,8,10,12 ==== f,g,a,b,c,d,e.. you will need these for bar chords anyway. then do the same for the 5th string which starts at A open. If you know these 2 strings Ill show you how to get all the rest. first off the thin string #1 is also an e so its the same as the 6th string. Now we know 3 strings. heres the trick! Pick any note on the 3rd G or 4th D string anywhere up the fretboard. Look down 2 frets and down two strings (thicker) which will take you to the 5th or 6th string which you already know. That note is the same :example 4th string 7th fret... down 2 frets 5th down 2 strings (thicker) 6th string which is an A. you will easily get to recognize this as an A just by looking at the pattern. Now lets try a note on the third string G .. lets pick the 5th fret. transpose our pattern down 2 frets down 2 strings which gives us 5th string 3rd fret which is a C therefore 3rd string 5th fret is a C. I hope you see the pattern.
The only exception is the 2nd string. because you tuned the second string only 4 half steps higher than the 3rd. the pattern changes on this string it becomes down 3 frets then down 2 strings. which gives you the 4th string same note OR you can use directly down 5 frets and down 4 strings which takes you to the 6th string you already memorized. the first string is the same as the sixth string so you dont need to use any pattern on it. After a while you will start to recognize these notes throughout the fretboard and you,ll know all the notes. Most any practiced guitar player already knows the 5th and 6th strings because they are used for common barre chord formations the E barre and the A barre. I hope this helps.
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