#1
The title pretty much says it all. I usually just use one SM57 pointed toward the cone at about a 45 degree angle to record guitar. I find that this gives me the best overall clarity, but that I end up sacrificing some of the low end and "balls" of the guitar tone in the process (because it sounds 10x more mean in person). What's a good remedy to this? Would using 2 mics (an SM57 up close and a condenser a bit further back) help? I'm mainly recording metal, but am curious about this for any genre really.
- Gibson Flying V 120 #1 (White)
- Gibson Flying V 120 #2 (Cherry)
- Gibson SG Standard ('61 style)
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- ENGL Fireball 60
- Avatar 4x12

- Many pedals, plus other stuff
#2
try recording stuff twice? that will give you a fuller, thicker sound i think
#3
i dunno, u could do many things, double track, use equalization, boost low end, use a compressor maybe
#4
You can put a thick blanket (think Kim Kardashian thick) over the amp and the mic to trap the sound a bit, Joe Satriani once wrote that it greatly improved the sound.
#5
mix the bass guitar in. thickens your guitar up great. xD

2 mics can work but it can get really fiddly with phase cancellation (soundwaves hitting the 2 mics at different times and causing freq cancellations)

if you listen to metal recordings and get a part where its JUST guitar, you'll notice its rarely all that bassy. healthy amount of mids and contoured highs is usually all that encompasses guitars.

anything produced by andy sneap is a good guideline if you like his production style. even if you don't, there's something to be learned from him..
Grammar and spelling omitted as an exercise for the reader.
#6
There's really no way to fix it completely with an SM57, they're just not ballsy mikes.

Pointing the mic towards the outer edges of the speaker cone will capture more bottom end as opposed to right at the centre of the cone. Playing everything twice and panning one take hard left and one hard right will also add width and guts to your sound. And the blanked trick is also another handy technique.

If you're recording distorted guitars, I wouldn't ever use a compressor. The distortion itself comes from compression within the amp and the dynamic range of a well crafted distortion sound should be pretty small anyway.
#7
Yeah, I've tried raising the mic stand so that it points closer to the outer edge of the cone, but usually, the end result is kind of muddy and doesn't cut through the mix very well. I always double track guitars, which definitely helps, but it just seems like there's something missing at times (although who knows, maybe it's my mixing?). I don't use a compressor on distorted guitars, ever, lol. Boosting the low end with EQ seems to drown out the bass guitar and kick drum, so I try to avoid that.

Whenever I try to mix more bass in, it tends to drown out the kick drum, (but does help quite a bit with the guitars) and can make the mix sound muddy. Should I cut the crap out of the lower mids in the bass or something? As much as the bass can help, I still want to be able to hear everything well in the mix, including the bass, rather than just using it to make the guitars sound heavier.

And also, if there's a better dynamic mic for recording guitar than the SM57, by all means feel free to send suggestions my way I'm saving up for new studio gear anyway and could always use the 57 as a snare mic if I find something else for gee-tar.
- Gibson Flying V 120 #1 (White)
- Gibson Flying V 120 #2 (Cherry)
- Gibson SG Standard ('61 style)
- Jackson DK2M

- ENGL Fireball 60
- Avatar 4x12

- Many pedals, plus other stuff
#8
I wasn't saying that the 57 is a **** mic, not by any means. They're just a very 'present' mic, a lot of high mids and top end. A Sennheisser e609 goes fantastically on guitars or even pairing the 57 with a large diaphragm condenser.

I reread your first post and if you want 'mean' and balls, it's all in the low mids, just make sure that where you boost the bass, you cut the guitars and bit, and where you cut guitars, boost the bass. Also, a slight boost on the bass guitar at around 1-1.5kHz can add some real clarity and stop it from getting lost when you're EQing other low end stuff like the kick