#1
Alagiah asked to quit charity job

BBC newsreader George Alagiah has resigned as a patron of the Fairtrade Foundation over concerns of a potential conflict of interest.


Not content with upsetting thousands of older TV viewers, the BBC has now decided that George Alagiah, one of the most senior newsreaders and correspondents within the corporation, must give up his role as a patron for the Fairtrade Foundation, on the grounds of "protecting it's reputation for impartiality".

We've seen this before from the BBC.

Do you feel that the BBC should protect it's "reputation for impartiality" at all costs or are there cases where their support is needed?

Should major news corporations have roles to play in the aid of charitable causes or should they be sticking to their, ahem, jobs?
#2
Quote by Don_Humpador
Should major news corporations have roles to play in the aid of charitable causes or should they be sticking to their, ahem, jobs?
The BBC is publicly funded and they have to set an example. Yes, in this case, it seems like overkill, but we do have private new channels (e.g. ITV, Channel 4) who aren't financially obliged to retain so much impartiality. The reason why we all have to pay the TV license fee is for the BBC, which has no advertisements or sponsors to support itself and is funded by us.

I can't personally think of any reason why fair trade wouldn't be seen as a positive thing, but the fact is, supporting it is still seen as a political stance, which BBC reporters are not allowed to take.

I watch the Channel 4 news instead. Jon Snow ftw.
#3
I think sticking to their, ahem, jobs to be frank. However, why they haven't told Paxman to stop helping the British-American project now they've started doing this more surprises me.
#5
Quote by webbtje
I think sticking to their, ahem, jobs to be frank. However, why they haven't told Paxman to stop helping the British-American project now they've started doing this more surprises me.


Cause Paxman is the f*cking boss.
MAN CITY


De Montfort Uni
#6
Quote by rigiddigits
The BBC is publicly funded and they have to set an example. Yes, in this case, it seems like overkill, but we do have private new channels (e.g. ITV, Channel 4) who aren't financially obliged to retain so much impartiality. The reason why we all have to pay the TV license fee is for the BBC, which has no advertisements or sponsors to support itself and is funded by us.

I can't personally think of any reason why fair trade wouldn't be seen as a positive thing, but the fact is, supporting it is still seen as a political stance, which BBC reporters are not allowed to take.

I watch the Channel 4 news instead. Jon Snow ftw.


Yeah, I see that, I usually watch Channel 4 news, I actually find it more "impartial" than most of the BBC production.

But should the BBC really be holding back it's reporters and journalists like this? Obviously George Alagiah feels this is important to him, I think the BBC are assuming that his charitable interests will conflict, yet there is no evidence (that they are pointing to) that it has done.
#7
Quote by webbtje
I think sticking to their, ahem, jobs to be frank. However, why they haven't told Paxman to stop helping the British-American project now they've started doing this more surprises me.


Because Paxman rules. As well you know.
The DNA results show that Jeremy Kyle is a nob.


Quote by titsmcgee852
I want to look at your sexual naked body.
#8
Paxman's been dealing with fools for years - The BBC would never stand a chance!
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#9
I think asking someone to resign from their job because they support the fair payment to impoverished farmers is ridiculous, really. Screw impartiality.

Regardless, this one person in the organisation doesn't represent the opinions of the organisation itself. I think if every member of the BBC had to resign because they put their extra penny in the tin at their local newagents we wouldn't have much of a BBC.

Edit: Oh, I thought he had to resign from the BBC.

I sill don't think it's fair though.
The UG Awards exist only to instill me with existential doubt.


For me, the 60's ended that day in 1978...

Willies. Fuck the lick and fuck you too.
Last edited by TheBurningFish at Aug 4, 2009,
#12
Quote by Hammerzeit
I'd rather all the bbc's hypocracy than ****ing adverts. I hate ads on tv.


There is no hypocrisy on the BBC's part. By using the money from the TV Licences they have agreed to be completely impartial and therefore cannot be seen to have a high ranking member of a charity group reading the news and perhaps putting his charitable agenda first. It'd be like having Bono on the news at ten, and you wouldn't want that, would you?
The DNA results show that Jeremy Kyle is a nob.


Quote by titsmcgee852
I want to look at your sexual naked body.
#13
Quote by Ed Hunter
There is no hypocrisy on the BBC's part. By using the money from the TV Licences they have agreed to be completely impartial and therefore cannot be seen to have a high ranking member of a charity group reading the news and perhaps putting his charitable agenda first. It'd be like having Bono on the news at ten, and you wouldn't want that, would you?


.. But there's no evidence of George Alagiah proclaiming fair trade to be the best thing since sliced bread on the 6'o'clock news.
#14
Quote by Don_Humpador
.. But there's no evidence of George Alagiah proclaiming fair trade to be the best thing since sliced bread on the 6'o'clock news.

This.

I wouldn't even have known this guy had ****-ass to do with Fairtrade if they hadn't drawn everyone's attention to it.
The UG Awards exist only to instill me with existential doubt.


For me, the 60's ended that day in 1978...

Willies. Fuck the lick and fuck you too.
#15
Quote by Ed Hunter
There is no hypocrisy on the BBC's part. By using the money from the TV Licences they have agreed to be completely impartial and therefore cannot be seen to have a high ranking member of a charity group reading the news and perhaps putting his charitable agenda first. It'd be like having Bono on the news at ten, and you wouldn't want that, would you?


Considering all the U2 and Bono fellating the BBC's been up to recently, I really wouldn't be surprised. You can tell they were at a loose end.

"What's Bono up to at the moment?"

"Well, he has this fucking awful 15 minute long poem about Elvis. Let's stick that on for a laugh."


An excerpt:

Elvis
had an acute intelligence disguised as talent
Elvis
broke priscilla’s heart
Elvis
broke lisa marie’s heart
Elvis
woke up my heart
Elvis
white trash
Elvis
the memphis flash
Elvis
didn’t smoke hash
and woulda been a sissy
without johnny cash
Elvis
didn’t dodge the draft
Elvis
had his own aircraft
#16
Quote by Hammerzeit
I'd rather all the bbc's hypocracy than ****ing adverts. I hate ads on tv.


I'd rather have adverts than have to pay £150 because I have a computer :-/
#17
Quote by webbtje
Considering all the U2 and Bono fellating the BBC's been up to recently, I really wouldn't be surprised. You can tell they were at a loose end.

"What's Bono up to at the moment?"

"Well, he has this fucking awful 15 minute long poem about Elvis. Let's stick that on for a laugh."


An excerpt:

Wow, no wonder Bono's considered a genius.
Most 10-year-olds would have given up on a peom like that, thinking it was total bollocks.
Only the trancendental amiazingness that is Bono could realise that it's actually good, when everyone else sees a whole load of f*cking sh*te.