#1
I'm really interested in going to music school for guitar, probably a place like Berklee or GIT, and I'd like to know if I'm on the right track. I know my major, natural, and harmonic minor scales (as well as pentatonics), and the modes of the major scale. I'm working on learning harmonic and melodic minor modes. I know a bunch of chord shapes and am working on inversions. I have 2 years before I'm done high school so that gives me plenty of time. I can read music but not fluently in every postition across the fretboard. I've been doing some short, consistent practice on reading music every day. I'm decent at learning songs and I'm working on Electric Gypsy by Andy Timmons. There's a link to some of my playing in my sig.

So I got two questions
1. Am I on the right track in terms of playing and theory to make it into a music school?
2. Would a music school be a good idea for me in order to vastly improve my playing and help me land a music industry job (perhaps teaching or as a studio musician)?
Ibanez S320 with Dimarzio Fred + Seymour Duncan 59-> Weeping Demon Wah -> Ibanez TS-7 -> Homemade iBoost x3 -> Keeley DS-1 -> Visual Sound H2O -> MXR Ten Band -> Traynor YCV20
#2
I wanna go to GIT. Learn all the theory you possibly can!!!! A degree in guitar would be a great thing for you to have as a musician. Especially as a teacher.
#3
Keep up lots of practice reading.

And the music school really depends on what style you want to play and the way you want to be taught.
#5
im currently in first year at my music uni and its pretty intense.

the main things they would be looking for are: very fluent in major, mel minor, and harm minor (plus all their modes) in every position e.g they'll say play eb lydian dominat off this notes etc (this is the same for chords). i wouldn't worry too much about inversions, in jazz there basically never used on guitar anyway. strong comping in swing and Latin (probably bossa), aural skills singing major plus modes intervals and rhythmic transcription, sight reading is good and a must later, but for audition its not that important (they'll probably ask you to read a standard) and get to know A LOT of standards, you don't have to memorize them all, just be familiar with them, it will help in the long run.

if you get all that down you'll definitely get in and its definitely possible to learn the shizzle well in two years, i had only been playing guitar for 1 1/2 years when i went fro my audition but i practice at least 8 hours a day. just put in the hours.

the real **** starts when you get in, not trying to scare you but get used to people "constructively' criticizing your playing

btw im assuming you play jazz
Originally Posted by jmac72187
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
Last edited by Archeo Avis 2 at Aug 5, 2009,
#7
Yes, you are on the right track. Find out from these schools (not from us!), what exactly they expect for entrance requirements.

Though I find it hard to believe that inversions are rarely used in jazz (what about all those fancy chords like Dmaj7b13/F# and stuff... ), though you're right on the money that getting into a program is just the beginning. Once you're in, you're still going to have to work like a dog, and it gets quite competitive if you let yourself buy into that.

As far as teaching.... what sort of teaching are you interested in? Teaching in the school system, or teaching in a music store or private lessons and that sort of thing?

If your goal is to teach in a school, I can give you a ton more advice, as that is the path I took, and that is what I do. As I see it, you might *not* be on the right track.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#8
I'm really not looking at taking a jazz program at a "real" university. I was more looking into going into a music specific place like Berklee, GIT, or McNally Smith, and to keep my main genre as rock while branching out into other genres. I'm keen on teaching private guitar lessons or teaching in a music store. Is it even possible to teach only gutiar at a school system?
Ibanez S320 with Dimarzio Fred + Seymour Duncan 59-> Weeping Demon Wah -> Ibanez TS-7 -> Homemade iBoost x3 -> Keeley DS-1 -> Visual Sound H2O -> MXR Ten Band -> Traynor YCV20
#9
I also would disagree that inversions are never used in jazz. But one thing I would say about learning chords with the aim of playing jazz: don't just learn shapes. Learn the notes, and certainly learn what all of the intervals in the chord are, this helps a hell of a lot with tricky jazz chords (as you know where alterations and such must be made). But also to play jazz guitar in a jazz band you may be encouraged to play sparse voicings, and very often, voicings without the root (bassists very often prefer you not to), and voicings that give scope for reharmonisation by soloists.
#10
Quote by Archeo Avis 2
im currently in first year at my music uni and its pretty intense.

the main things they would be looking for are: very fluent in major, mel minor, and harm minor (plus all their modes) in every position e.g they'll say play eb lydian dominat off this notes etc (this is the same for chords). i wouldn't worry too much about inversions, in jazz there basically never used on guitar anyway. strong comping in swing and Latin (probably bossa), aural skills singing major plus modes intervals and rhythmic transcription, sight reading is good and a must later, but for audition its not that important (they'll probably ask you to read a standard) and get to know A LOT of standards, you don't have to memorize them all, just be familiar with them, it will help in the long run.

if you get all that down you'll definitely get in and its definitely possible to learn the shizzle well in two years, i had only been playing guitar for 1 1/2 years when i went fro my audition but i practice at least 8 hours a day. just put in the hours.

the real **** starts when you get in, not trying to scare you but get used to people "constructively' criticizing your playing

btw im assuming you play jazz
What university do you go to? Chord Inversions is a great tool to create movement when you're comping in a small combo, for most of the big music universities sight reading is a must for the audition so is very important with the audition, and you definitely should have most of the major standards and chord progressions memorized.
#12
You're here in Hamilton! I went to Mac. They (at least at the time) ran a really great program. It was also a small program, so you got to know your professors on a first-name basis. If I had to do it all over again, I would totally have chosen Mac again. I loved it. I studied for my last two years under Jeff McFadden for my private lessons, who I believe is still there. Maybe look him up and see what he has to say on where you're at.

Quote by Robino_Ibanez
Is it even possible to teach only gutiar at a school system?



Sure it is! I went to Cathedral and they had a guitar program there, and that was '84 to '88.

Now, loads of schools have them. Most of the Catholic high schools have them - Thomas More, Cardinal Newmann and still Cathedral for sure. I've taught guitar in all those schools, though not in the last 12 since I got hired by the public board.

In the public board, I know Delta has a guitar program, and I think Waterdown does too. I know MM Robinson in Burlington does too, but that's the Halton board.

Mind you, I don't think in *any* of those schools there is a teacher who teaches nothing but guitar.

The trick, as a high school music teacher, is to create a demand for your program, and for the courses you want to take in that program. You need a minimum of I think it is 15 kids to run a course. So, if you can round up and promote and build a program where you have 150 interested in taking guitar, that is 6 classes of 25 kids each. There's a full time job teaching nothing but guitar!! However, before you get too excited, administrators love you to offer new courses and build new branches for programs, but at the same time, they don't like you to abandon the more traditional classes. If the means is there to hire another music teacher to cover the more traditional programs like concert band and vocal classes, great. Otherwise, despite enrollment, you may be directed to teach two band classes, a vocal, and the first 90 kids who signed up for guitar get into one of the three guitar classes, while the others are told, "sorry, courses are full."

However, if you don't build up and promote your program, and only have 90 kids sign up for music in general, then you'll get to run three sections of music, (which, with only 90 kids, you can bet will probably amount to one beginner band class, one multi-level band class made up of a huge split of grades 10, 11, and 12, and one vocal class with grades 9-12 all in the same room..... now *there's* a bit of a challenge!) and get stuck teaching three sections of something else - and they might not be things you're really thrilled about teaching. (say, one section of credit recovery for the math slackers; grade 10 poetry and drama; and an applied-level grade nine history)

In any case, to get into the school system to teach Music, you need an *honours degree* in Music. That is your ticket into teachers college, which requires a degree from an accredited university. Check with the teachers' colleges to see if they will accept your degree from a place like Berklee or MIT, because they might not be recognized accredited *academic* programs. You'd really hate to walk out of Berklee, only to find out later that the teachers' college you want to go to won't accept their certification.

Keep in mind, too, that as much as getting into a university music program is difficult, getting into teachers' college is also either very difficult (if you go in Ontario) or moderately difficult and very expensive (if you go to teachers' college in the US). Also keep in mind that, right now, the pendulum is at the daunting end of the swing and there are *very* few jobs for teachers right now. For the past couple of years, first and second year teachers have been breathing sighs of relief just finding out there won't be any layoffs.

That said, the pendulum does swing back the other way. When I finished teachers' college at Nipissing, all the boards of ed came up for their career presentations and told us to not even apply. "Don't sit there thinking that your resume with your experience will stand out among all the others and get you a job, because they all look the same in a manilla envelope that goes straight into the recycle bin. We're not even opening them." The university also ran seminars entitled "alternative careers for teachers" - and we weren't even finished our training yet!!

But eventually, hirings started happening, and for a few years, it was even a real hiring fest. And so the pendulum continues to swing....

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#13
Quote by Streetking07
Learning other instruments also would help getting into a music school.

It's not in the requirements for Berklee or GIT, but I do also play trumpet.
Quote by axemanchris
You're here in Hamilton! I went to Mac. They (at least at the time) ran a really great program. It was also a small program, so you got to know your professors on a first-name basis. If I had to do it all over again, I would totally have chosen Mac again. I loved it. I studied for my last two years under Jeff McFadden for my private lessons, who I believe is still there. Maybe look him up and see what he has to say on where you're at.

Sounds cool, I live within a 5 minute walk of Mac. But is this program totally jazz-focused? Or classical? I'm up for learning jazz/classical (and all sorts of new genres), but it's not currently my main genre or a large strength of mine. I was more intrigued by contemporary music schools (eg. Berklee and others). I'll look up Jeff McFadden, though. As far as the part of your post on teaching at a school, that sounds like an interesting path I should look into. But I'd really have to work to learn classical or jazz if they don't accept degrees from Berklee/Musicians institute. If I was to go to a music-specific school, would this benefit me in order to teach private lessons? And would that be enough to make a living (maybe I could work as a studio musician or play some session-type gigs too)?
Ibanez S320 with Dimarzio Fred + Seymour Duncan 59-> Weeping Demon Wah -> Ibanez TS-7 -> Homemade iBoost x3 -> Keeley DS-1 -> Visual Sound H2O -> MXR Ten Band -> Traynor YCV20
#14
Heh... I live right near you - at the top of Longwood near Princess Point.

Mac offers classical and jazz programs. Jeff is a classical guy, but should be able to point you in a direction either way.

If you want, PM me and I'll give you my phone # and we can chat.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#15
Quote by rockinrider55
What university do you go to? Chord Inversions is a great tool to create movement when you're comping in a small combo, for most of the big music universities sight reading is a must for the audition so is very important with the audition, and you definitely should have most of the major standards and chord progressions memorized.


ANU School of music in Australia, i assume by inversions you mean voicings which are completely diffident but can be confused among guitarists. e.g a guitarist playing a d altered by taking a common 'd7' shape and adding and removing notes to suit, its not an inversion which actually get quite complicated, but a voicing. sight reading is not a deal breaker in audition, it will impress but is not necessary.

you don't need to have 'most of the major standards' (whatever the 'major' standards are) memorized. there will always be a real book on a gig or jamming, get familiar with them and common chord progs but they don't need to be memorized. im against real book for learning songs (they should be transcribed from a great) but they are useful reminders.

what uni do you go to???

over all the audition shouls not be that hard, and you defiantly need to start transcribing, include it in your routine.
Originally Posted by jmac72187
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
Last edited by Archeo Avis 2 at Aug 5, 2009,
#16
Quote by Archeo Avis 2
ANU School of music in Australia


Hey I'm at ANU too doing Grad Dip in Law! How crazy Are you playing around Canberra?

Out of interest, is the GIT in the same "league" as Berklee? Maybe you should look into specific schools and enquire about their "exact" requirements. You don't want to have an application rejected on the basis of formalities.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#17
Quote by Archeo Avis 2
ANU School of music in Australia, i assume by inversions you mean voicings which are completely diffident but can be confused among guitarists. e.g a guitarist playing a d altered by taking a common 'd7' shape and adding and removing notes to suit, its not an inversion which actually get quite complicated, but a voicing. sight reading is not a deal breaker in audition, it will impress but is not necessary.

you don't need to have 'most of the major standards' (whatever the 'major' standards are) memorized. there will always be a real book on a gig or jamming, get familiar with them and common chord progs but they don't need to be memorized. im against real book for learning songs (they should be transcribed from a great) but they are useful reminders.

what uni do you go to???

over all the audition shouls not be that hard, and you defiantly need to start transcribing, include it in your routine.
? Inversions don't have anything to do with adding or removing notes. I was talking about using both regular and drop inversions of chords to create motion with comping lines over sections of the same chord or using it for some chord melody arrangements.

I don't know about that school, but I've been studying with multiple teachers from different US music schools who audition and sight reading ability has been what they say most people who don't get accepted lack. On top of that I have players I know who just had their auditions last year and the ones that weren't accepted did because of their lack of skill in sight reading.

I guess you don't need the big standards memorized for auditioning, but in my opinion you don't really have control of the song unless its memorized. That's just me though
#18
to alanhb: that's pretty trippy, i can t gat any gigs in Canberra but a lot of the really good guys at som play at trinity.

to rocknrider55: dont get me started on inversions, but thanks for the insight - from someone who's never even auditioned, if you memorize all you tunes you know, you don't know enough tunes.
Originally Posted by jmac72187
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
Last edited by Archeo Avis 2 at Aug 6, 2009,
#19
About the sight reading - I guess this is a perfect example of how some schools have different expectations for auditions than others.

I seem to recall (though only vaguely... it was a while ago) having a *small* sight reading component for my audition. It think it amounted to four or eight bars of a monophonic melody, and even at that, wasn't very challenging. I guess the purpose of it was that it was a guarantee to separate the people who learned their pieces from tabs or something vs. those that could actually read.

Lesson: contact the specific school(s) and find out.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#20
Quote by Archeo Avis 2
to alanhb: that's pretty trippy, i can t gat any gigs in Canberra but a lot of the really good guys at som play at trinity.


It's extremely easy to get gigs in Canberra - you just gotta get hooked up with the music crowd here. Studying music and not networking? For shame
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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