#1
I've been searching alot of information about chords on the internet, and I have found alot about it for guitar. But I find very little about bass chords.

Can someone post me a link to a chord chart for bass?
#5
That;s because you don't hear chords on bass too much/you're playing chords with notes too low, getting a muddy sound.
#6
in my experience, chords with the E and sometimes A strings sound muddy
EDIT: ^^
DONT RISK IT, BUY A BASS AMP
#8
Bass chords are the same notes/positions/shapes as guitar chords. However i agree they tend to not sound as 'obvious' as guitar chords and the notes bleed a lot more. In my experience of bass chords more is less - you don't always need the 5th for example, especially if it's being played by other instruments and if it's cluttering things up you can just drop it out. Also addin natural harmonics to bass chords is a beautiful way of extending the basses slightly narrow range. (by narrow i mean you will struggle to make a chord that spans an octave and a 5th, a guitar can cover over 2 comfortably)
The only 6 words that can make you a better guitarist:

Learn theory
Practice better
Practice more
#9
Quote by MalGanisWL
bass chords are the same as guitar chords .

if they are the same ill kiss ur ass
#11
Quote by RazzleMCR1
if they are the same ill kiss ur ass


Silly boy....
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That is simultaneously brilliant and obscene. I honestly don't know if I despise, or admire you.

Quote by Scutchington
If I had room, I would sig that entire post.


basschat.co.uk
#12
Quote by RazzleMCR1
if they are the same ill kiss ur ass


what??

how can a chord on bass be any different?

e-b(fifth)-e(octave) on a guitar is the same as e-b(fifth)-e(octave) on a bass, it just sounds different. So start kissing.
Quote by Carmel
I can't believe you are whoring yourself out like that.

ಠ_ಠ
#14
But an A-chord on guitar is impossible to play on a (four string) bass, I assume?
#16
The two rules I set for myself are

a) no chords with the root note below open A
b) 2nds and thirds must be voiced as ninths and tenths

These two rules will help immensely in reducing muddiness
#17
The low sound combined with all the subharmonics bass strings have makes bass chords not as useful as guitar chords, although I do love to mess around with powerchords down teh neck on the D and G.
#18
I would advise only playing two note chords, octaves usually are good to stick with although sometimes ill use the same fret on the string above, one fret less, or occasionally the fifth(power chord)
#19
I love playing chords on bass--above the 5th fret, they lose the muddiness (though that has its place as well). They work great in solo pieces as accents in jazz and even funkier stuff (check out Les' use of dominant 7ths in Golden boy by Primus). I've worked up both Jordu and Moaning with jazz chords. I love the richness and depth that chords have on bass even more than guitar.

And true chords, not just two note harmonies.. btw.
#20
^^ as we all should, Anarkee, as we all should.

My teacher once described chords to me perfectly, once "Chords are used on bass, but normally broken down to one note at a time...arpeggios" (something like that) really made sense for me. (: hope that helps.
Try adding more delay.
#21
Gotta agree with telecaster, generally playing chords doesn't seem to make much sense on the bass because you get alot of mud. Not saying they can't be played, but it usually doesn't make sense. Learn Arpeggios instead.
2nd Bass
#22
Quote by Second Bass
Gotta agree with telecaster, generally playing chords doesn't seem to make much sense on the bass because you get alot of mud. Not saying they can't be played, but it usually doesn't make sense. Learn Arpeggios instead.

That may have been the nicest thing anyone has ever directed towards me on UG ever funny, cuz it tru.
Try adding more delay.
#23
Since we've passed all our information on chords, i'm just going to add that my absolute favourite chord is, root, major 3rd and then adding a flattened seventh. So many things can come off this chord
#25
Quote by Bass First
Since we've passed all our information on chords, i'm just going to add that my absolute favourite chord is, root, major 3rd and then adding a flattened seventh. So many things can come off this chord


Not wanting to be a jerk with theory, but that's a first inversion minor triad. just to let you know. Anyways, i agree with making 2nds and 3rds into 9ths and 10ths, more space with larger wavelengths is usually nice. One other thing to consider with chords is that the farther up the neck you play the chords, the more the undertones are going to come out, note how the same note on a lower string has a thicker sound? Exactly the same thing. So, one could argue that going up the strings could make it muddier than it needs to be, but playing around with the EQ should help.

Edit: wait, by flat do you mean diminished or minor/dominant?
Last edited by Halakar at Aug 6, 2009,
#26
^That's not even a minor triad, thus it couldn't possibly be one in first inversion (which is the third in the bass right?). It's 1-3-b7 which is just a dominant seventh chord without the fifth. It's a really great chord to play on the bass, especially if you're comping blues changes or what have you. There's a whole lot of space in it and it sounds very clear.
#27
Quote by Halakar
Not wanting to be a jerk with theory, but that's a first inversion minor triad. just to let you know.

......no it's not
E - G# - D
which if i'm correct should be a dominant 7th, minus a fifth, if you add the fifth on a bass it just creates confusion, absolutely love adding the 9th (?) to it on a guitar though.


EDIT: what he said ^
#28
Quote by Halakar
Not wanting to be a jerk with theory, but that's a first inversion minor triad. just to let you know. Anyways, i agree with making 2nds and 3rds into 9ths and 10ths, more space with larger wavelengths is usually nice. One other thing to consider with chords is that the farther up the neck you play the chords, the more the undertones are going to come out, note how the same note on a lower string has a thicker sound? Exactly the same thing. So, one could argue that going up the strings could make it muddier than it needs to be, but playing around with the EQ should help.

Edit: wait, by flat do you mean diminished or minor/dominant?

No it's not.

TS, There are no such thing as "bass" chords, just chords. And you can do all kinds of chords, but just spend the appropriate amount of time finding a good EQ.
#29
Quote by Second Bass
Gotta agree with telecaster, generally playing chords doesn't seem to make much sense on the bass because you get alot of mud. Not saying they can't be played, but it usually doesn't make sense. Learn Arpeggios instead.


Buddy, youve got a lot to learn
#31
is it just me or does

G|7
D|5

sounds almost exactly the same as

G|7
D|9

(7th fret on g string stays but it doesn't matter where I fret my D string, it always sounds the same to me.)
#33
Sorry, I got the impression that a diminished seventh was being used. Man, I feel really dumb now. And to think that I took AP theory....
Last edited by Halakar at Aug 7, 2009,
#34
Quote by jazz_rock_feel
It's probably just how you're playing the chord. You're probably stressing the G string a little bit more and you're just hearing the D ring through the chords.


Maybe, but if even if I pluck them instead of using a plectrum, I still get the same sound.