#1
How come on older Gibson guitars, the wraparound bridge is put at an angle, like this:


Whereas on newer ones, it's a less drastic angle, like this:


Don't just say "intonation". Please explain in detail, if you can.

Thank you in advance.
#2
it may effect the tone, if you think about it, if the bridge is angled the higher strings will be closer and get a sharper tone and the lower strings will be further, getting warmer.

Edit: to explain better, the pickup is closer to the bridge for the higher strings and further for the lower ones.
Last edited by stephen_rettie at Aug 5, 2009,
#3
erm, im not an expert,
but i think on the old style of wraparound bridge, it was at an angle for better intonation.
or something like that??

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#4
Quote by stephen_rettie
it may effect the tone, if you think about it, if the bridge is angled the higher strings will be closer and get a sharper tone and the lower strings will be further, getting warmer.

Edit: to explain better, the pickup is closer to the bridge for the higher strings and further for the lower ones.

This makes sense, but wouldn't it affect the intonation, especially if the bridge doesn't have adjustable saddles?

It would have made more sense to put the pickup at an angle, in that case.
#5
If you look the bridges saddles are made to compensate for intonation. You just change how you make it and can reduce the angle. Its not a very good system as it has limited adjustments if you have 1 string that wont intonate not much you can do about it. And its not so easy to change string ga or drop tune alot as the intonation was set up for a certain ga strings at standard tuning.
#6
If you look closely at the newer bridge, I think you'll find it's compensated, negating the need for such a dramatic angle.