#1
What is the "Direct out" on various pedals......(basically boss pedals since I just got a couple new ones).

I normally go from the guitar into the input on the pedal then output and to the amp, but I don't use the direct out and don't know what it is used for.

Any help would be appreciated....thanks
#2
Direct out means without the effect. They do this so you can have the affected signal in one amp, and still your normal signal in another. This is called a wet/dry set up and is incredibly fun. So if it is a delay, you'll have your regular signal, unchanged in the amp hooked up to the direct out, and just the repeats from the delay in the effect out. This is incredibly fun by the way, the only downside is when you turn off the pedal, your effect out becomes the bypass, which makes no sense. I wish it bypassed to the direct out all the time, and just used the effect out when engaged.
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Last edited by tubetime86 at Aug 5, 2009,
#3
Hmm...ok. I just got the Boss DD-3. So I run the direct out into my amp, and then the effect out where? To another pedal?

p.s. Im starting to understand this, its just a little confusing
#4
So essentially your plugged into two amps or one amp and a monitor/pa system then
#5
Quote by darb0114
Hmm...ok. I just got the Boss DD-3. So I run the direct out into my amp, and then the effect out where? To another pedal?

p.s. Im starting to understand this, its just a little confusing

OK, good, I have a DD-3 too so this should be easy...


Guitar -> Input -> Direct out -> Whatever amp you want to have just the normal sounds
.........................->Effect out -> Whatever amp you want to have just the repeats

Obviously you need two amps for this. If you really are dying to try it and don't have two, get a 1/8" to 1/4" adapter and plug some computer speakers into the Effect out. It just sounds cool hearing the signal, and the delay seperately.

Edit: It is a little confusing, you just have to think; with delay there is what you played, and what the pedal played after you played. The two outs just let you seperate these. Imagine this with, say, a chorus. You'd still have your clean tone in one amp, but then a seperate amp would be playing the chorused tone. (I don't know if chorus pedals have this, but its just an example. The point is there is an effected signal and a non effected signal, hence wet (effected) and dry (dry, or lacking effects.)
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Unless its electronic drums.

BURN THE WITCH!!!!!
Last edited by tubetime86 at Aug 5, 2009,
#6
Ok....that is pretty cool. This is something I definately want to experience with. In doin this, if you have multiple effects with this feature, you can only use the direct out on one of the pedals since most don't have a direct in, if Im thinkin this right.

Thanks again
#7
That is very interesting, especially since I have been experimenting with my limited cables, pedals and connectors to try and create a similar effect.
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#8
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That is very interesting, especially since I have been experimenting with my limited cables, pedals and connectors to try and create a similar effect.

Oh man, it is GOOD fun. Two nights ago, I set this up with a heavy overdriven tone from my Valve Junior for the repeats, and a slightly fuzzed clean from my Bassman for the direct out. It sounded HUGE! Nice clear ringing notes the first time, then 4 or 5 repeats that are nice and crunchy...
Quote by Cathbard
Quote by Raijouta
Unless its electronic drums.

BURN THE WITCH!!!!!