#1
Im looking for song examples for all the modes eg for the love of god aeolian
Last edited by Serg1 at Aug 5, 2009,
#5
Quote by Eastwinn
I've attached it. It uses a minor tonic instead of a diminished and suggests b5 elsewhere.



i know what locrian sounds like just need examples
#6
For the Love of God is in E minor, and the overwhelming majority of Western music is not modal in any way.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#7
Quote by Archeo Avis
the overwhelming majority of Western music is not modal in any way.



why bother learning modes then?
#8
Quote by Archeo Avis
For the Love of God is in E minor, and the overwhelming majority of Western music is not modal in any way.


THANK YOU!

95% of people going on about modes are just referring to them as glorified hand positions. Real modal music is well... modal, and doesn't just go through every possible hand position for that scale. For something to 'go through all the modes' it would involve essentially 7 different 'keys' (well not keys but.. modes).

why bother learning modes then?


Most people are using 'mode' and 'hand position' interchangeably. If you're one of these people then it just means being able to play the same scale anywhere on the fretboard. Otherwise if you want to learn modes in the proper sense, then it's because you want to write modal music.
i have a 'white guitar'
Last edited by .fallen at Aug 5, 2009,
#9
Quote by .fallen
THANK YOU!

95% of people going on about modes are just referring to them as glorified hand positions. Real modal music is well... modal, and doesn't just go through every possible hand position for that scale. For something to 'go through all the modes' it would involve essentially 7 different 'keys' (well not keys but.. modes).



Most people are using 'mode' and 'hand position' interchangeably. If you're one of these people then it just means being able to play the same scale anywhere on the fretboard. Otherwise if you want to learn modes in the proper sense, then it's because you want to write modal music.



ive not heard about modes being used for hand positions in this way. can you give an example
#10
Quote by Serg1
why bother learning modes then?


There is certainly a thing or two you could learn about tonal music from modes, but, for the most part, they are extremely unimportant to study if you plan on writing tonal music.
#11
I don't think people necessarily always get confused between hand positions and modes, although many do. The word mode has two meanings though; it refers to modal music which, as is so often said on here, is very rare and isn't worth spending time on if there are gaps in your more standard knowledge; it also however to think in terms of modes when improvising or writing melodies, which here is used perhaps very loosely, but nevertheless is a very standard usage so ignoring it just clouds the issue for people trying to learn - here it of a mode is a collection of notes from which each chord is derived, and although there is a parent scale, using modes is a useful way of targeting your playing.
#12
Modes can be very useful. Not in actually using them, but in studying them. Looking at parallel modes can really help you when you're choosing accidentals from major or minor. I.e. know the different sounds you can get with the natural 6 in Dorian, and you could use that natural 6 in a minor key to give you a different sound. You're still playing minor, but this is a good way to know how certain accidentals sound. This is really the only practical application for most people. I'm not saying you CAN'T write modal music, but if you have to ask for examples of songs that use modes, you're not close to being ready to write modal music.
#13
Quote by timeconsumer09
Modes can be very useful. Not in actually using them, but in studying them. Looking at parallel modes can really help you when you're choosing accidentals from major or minor. I.e. know the different sounds you can get with the natural 6 in Dorian, and you could use that natural 6 in a minor key to give you a different sound. You're still playing minor, but this is a good way to know how certain accidentals sound. This is really the only practical application for most people. I'm not saying you CAN'T write modal music, but if you have to ask for examples of songs that use modes, you're not close to being ready to write modal music.


I agree with everything said here.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#14
No Quarter- Led Zeppelin -dorian.

Or at least the vast majority of it. (Seriously, its just vamping over D dorian for all the verses)
#15
Quote by Archeo Avis
I agree with everything said here.


Christ, my heart nearly stopped when I read this and saw who said it. I feel like JD getting 'complimented' by Dr. Cox.
#16
Quote by timeconsumer09
Christ, my heart nearly stopped when I read this and saw who said it. I feel like JD getting 'complimented' by Dr. Cox.




Normally I just assume he basically agrees with me when he doesn't correct me.
#17
Quote by timeconsumer09
Christ, my heart nearly stopped when I read this and saw who said it. I feel like JD getting 'complimented' by Dr. Cox.
, I saw your post, and then underneath that he had quoted it(without seeing his actual post), and I was thinking "REALLY DUDE? That's a great post on modes, this must be nitpicky as hell even for you!"

And then I breathed a sigh of relief.
#18
Go to a catholic church. There's a good chance that at least one of the songs they'll use is actually a modal song written back in the 16th century, especially if you're visiting a diocese that is resistant to change (as in, the priest is still talking in Latin).

Also, aeolian, locrian and ionian aren't really modes in the traditional sense. They're an addition added by jazz theorists much later to fill in the gaps they needed to fill in order for their theories on modes to be correct. Back before the tonal times, there were eight modes; phrygian, hypophrygian, dorian, hypodorian, lydian, hypolydian, mixolydian, hypomixolydian.

Most people are using 'mode' and 'hand position' interchangeably. If you're one of these people then it just means being able to play the same scale anywhere on the fretboard. Otherwise if you want to learn modes in the proper sense, then it's because you want to write modal music.
This fallacy came from the way jazz musicians used to use modes (which wasn't actually truly modal, btw). Later, guitarists tried to do something similar and failed so miserably.
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#19
Quote by timeconsumer09
Modes can be very useful. Not in actually using them, but in studying them. Looking at parallel modes can really help you when you're choosing accidentals from major or minor. I.e. know the different sounds you can get with the natural 6 in Dorian, and you could use that natural 6 in a minor key to give you a different sound. You're still playing minor, but this is a good way to know how certain accidentals sound. This is really the only practical application for most people. I'm not saying you CAN'T write modal music, but if you have to ask for examples of songs that use modes, you're not close to being ready to write modal music.


This is what I stress always.

Working with modal progression isolates sounds/notes, and if you go through each one individual, you get a far better understanding/aural sense of the notes/sounds.

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#20
Also, aeolian, locrian and ionian aren't really modes in the traditional sense. They're an addition added by jazz theorists much later to fill in the gaps they needed to fill in order for their theories on modes to be correct.


All three of those modes far predate jazz. The seven modes of the major scale have been recognized for centuries (hypodorian and the others you mentioned are something different entirely), and a few classical composers (though rarely, since classical period music is overwhelmingly tonal) even experimented with modal passages. Locrian was recognized (though not really used) as being of interest because of the tension produced by the diminished tonic chord.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
Last edited by Archeo Avis at Aug 6, 2009,
#21
Quote by Serg1
ive not heard about modes being used for hand positions in this way. can you give an example
Lots of people on here think thats what modes are - because unfortunately there a lot of books/websites that show 7 positions of the major scale and name those positions after modes (based on what degree of the scale the lowest note of that 3nps position is) -so there are a whole bunch of confused guitarists out there believing they are playing modes when actually they are just playing the major scale without understanding it

@TS: Sweet Home Alabama (Lynyrd Skynyrd) and Lil Ain't Enough (David Lee Roth) use mixolydian

@demon/archeo - what are hypophrygian/hypodorian/hypolydian/hypomixolydian? I'd just google it but there's so much misleading info on modes on the net that I wouldn't trust whatever I found in a search :S
#22
I'm not sure if this makes me a bad person but I'm not a fan of modal music - it's usually used for an excuse to twiddle around on your instruments.

Some guy may do a tasteless, wanky solo over a distorted metal backing and people scream "WANK", but take the same person playing that same solo over a clean jazzy background and people scream "WHAT AN ARTIST! FUSION GOD!" etc.

I'm not a big metal head either but you get the idea.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#23
This fallacy came from the way jazz musicians used to use modes (which wasn't actually truly modal, btw). Later, guitarists tried to do something similar and failed so miserably.



True modal jazz thinking didn't start appearing until the late fifties and modal improvising didn't start happening until the 60s and 70s. Before that it's all based on chord tone soloing.
Last edited by Confusius at Aug 6, 2009,