#1
Just wondering what makes the bassists here on UG's techniques unique or strange.

Personally, I think my left hand technique is a little odd, and I probably need to work on it. I don't put my thumb on the back of the neck; when I'm playing the D and G, it actually curls up around a bit. Sometimes, when I'm playing a riff I already know pretty well, I'll even bring my thumb up around to fret notes on the E; anchoring my thumb on the back has always felt unnatural, plus, with my thumb unanchored, I feel I can move up and down the neck a lot quicker, which allows me to jump up octaves and such (which I love to do) smoothly, even when playing the D and G. The other thing that makes my technique wierd is something I just realized today I definitely need to work on; I almost always focus on my index and ring fingers. I'll add in my middle finger occasionally, but usually only when playing three straight semi-tones on one string or something like that, and I never use my pinky; I've decided to work on some exercies to correct that.

So, what's weird about your technique?
#2
i curl my thumb around the neck when im playing bluesy type things, or fingerpicking. For metal and shred i put it flat against the neck tho.

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#3
Not really technique, but I thin I have used just about everything small enough to hold as a pick at one point or another...
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#4
I hit the strings with my hands it seems to do the job.
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#5
Floating thumb technique. My plucking hands thumb rests on the strings that aren't being played. Doing this mutes the strings and helps me pluck the strings evenly.
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#6
Quote by BulletFrost
Floating thumb technique. My plucking hands thumb rests on the strings that aren't being played. Doing this mutes the strings and helps me pluck the strings evenly.

That's what I do too, although recently I've developed a habit of resting the side of my thumb directly on top of the E string when not playing it, and sliding over a bit to mute the A when necessary. When playing the E, usually I don't rest my thumb on anything at all, unless there's a long period of just low notes, then I rest it on the neck pickup usually.
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#7
Quote by BulletFrost
Floating thumb technique. My plucking hands thumb rests on the strings that aren't being played. Doing this mutes the strings and helps me pluck the strings evenly.


same
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Okay guys, I have a confession to make. Not really a confession since it's something that's been bugging me for awhile but I've always been in denial about it.

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#8
Quote by BulletFrost
Floating thumb technique. My plucking hands thumb rests on the strings that aren't being played. Doing this mutes the strings and helps me pluck the strings evenly.

I see the advantage, but just don't like the feel of it. I always anchor my thumb to a pick-up when fingerpicking. Luckily, muting comes pretty naturally to me as far as a left-hand technique; honestly, I didn't realize I did it until about a month or two from when I started playing.
#9
I cant slap more than Higher Ground and that was just so i could impress a couple of people.

If i do anchor my right hand it'll either be on the neck or lightly on the body just to keep a level height.

If i'm not thinking about it i'll fret the octave of a note with my pinky instead of my ring finger. dont know why.

When i'm playing with three fingers and i dont start the passage with my ring finger i'm likely to trip up.

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#10
Quote by Thegian

If i'm not thinking about it i'll fret the octave of a note with my pinky instead of my ring finger. dont know why.



I do that as well, but because of the size of my hands not really an odd technique per se. I also shift quite a bit and tend to barre on occasion ( a throw back to the rhythm guitar days I guess).
#11
Quote by BulletFrost
Floating thumb technique. My plucking hands thumb rests on the strings that aren't being played. Doing this mutes the strings and helps me pluck the strings evenly.


Same.

I'm convinced my technique is awful though. I can never get anything to sound as clean as it should, even though it comes across fine when i record.
#12
I have a very odd and complex right hand muting technique that I've developed for minimal sympathetic vibrations. Other than that I've found that, since playing upright, when I'm not thinking about it my middle and ring finger levitate together. It's really obnoxious because it's ruined any independence I may have once had between the two fingers.
#13
Quote by jazz_rock_feel
I have a very odd and complex right hand muting technique that I've developed for minimal sympathetic vibrations.

Do share.

Quote by jazz_rock_feel
Other than that I've found that, since playing upright, when I'm not thinking about it my middle and ring finger levitate together. It's really obnoxious because it's ruined any independence I may have once had between the two fingers.

I've read about that; there was an upright bassist featured in Bass Player who insisted that the pinky can't play notes on a bass, even an electric; I didn't see the point of his lesson. The entire thing was telling you to use your ring finger and pinky together until you get past the twelth fret.
#14
Basically, when I'm playing the E string it's normal and the muting of the higher strings is always done with my left hand. When I play the A string it's also normal and I just mute with follow through to the E string. When I play the D string my ring finger falls to mute the E string and follow through mutes the A string. When I play the G string my ring finger bends so that the first knuckle mutes the A string and the pad mutes the E string. When I play my C string my thumb falls down to mute the E string, the pad of my third finger mutes the A string and the first knuckle mutes the D string. I don't know why I worked it out that way as I'm sure there are easier ways, but it just kind of developed naturally.

As for the no pinky thing, that's an upright technique called the Simandl method. It's pretty much considered the standard method of upright playing, because it helps overcome the weakness of the pinky on such huge strings and massive scale. However, I don't think it has much of a place on electric bass other than in very, very young people.
#15
you aren't alone jazzy.

I play with one finger when I'm going slow.

I only tap when improvising, and then it's a rare note.
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#17
i only use my index and middle finger to pick. Ring and pinky mute the string above and my thumb either rests on E or is used to play note on the E string
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#18
I like to think I'm a pretty much "by-the-book" player. I have my bass strapped high up, keep my left hand thumb on the back of the neck, and for the most part, just use two fingers on my right hand. Maybe three if I'm playing Iron Maiden or something. I do use floating thumb from time to time after watching Gary Willis do a lesson on it.

Oh, sometimes my left hand shakes instinctively on fretted basses trying to do vibrato, from so much time playing upright and fretless.
#19
i play differently in the orchestra/windband i play in compared to how i play outside of it. when playing in the band, i use my thumb on the A string and very rarely use the E string but i would use my thumb if needed. when playing alone i tend to anchor on the pickup, E or A string and use 3 fingers. i also get critisized for not looking like i am "there". on stage i will wander around and look at things i normally wouldn't. no idea why, but it works for me.
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#20
On the Db note, you use your pinky with other fingers to overcome weakness, i use two fingers with my pinky infact so everytime i play a note with my little finger i press down with 3 fingers total.
You dont even get to the 12fret before you change only to the d, when you move into thumb position and then its difficult to incorperate your pinky in so you leave.
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#22
I guess my fretting technique is normal...

When it comes to plucking, I have a habit of using same finger whenever it's possible. Skipping a finger sometimes helps me feel the length of a note, or it just makes playing the string below easier.
#23
My left hand technique is normal. 1-2-4 for the lower frets, 1-finger-per-fret for the higher one.

My right hand technique has gotten pretty diverse. I tend to switch up between a lot of different techniques. I usually use a movable anchor for two finger, four finger free stroke for finger picking, three finger for triplets and galloping, double thumb, slap+pop, tapping, strumming folk guitar style, playing with thumb+index usually palm muted.
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Last edited by Hobble at Aug 6, 2009,
#24
I don't tend to use my middle finger on my left hand, it just kinda feels uncomfortable cause I feel it's too close to my index finger, which is probably the worst excuse ever

If I'm not playing the E string, I rest my thumb on it, unless it's something that moves fairly quickly between strings (like Metallica's King Nothing) then I just keep on the pickup.

I sometimes use my ring finger for galloping, but then my pinky feels the need to stick out :\

For slapping, I used a close fist if that''s really worth mentioning >.>, but I don't slap very often.

So overall, I think my technique is pretty decent, for not getting a lesson on technique
#25
i curl my thumb around the neck when I play and I use the floating thumb technique to mute strings.

When I play slap I sometimes curl my thumb around to mute the E string. (Ex: Can't stop when you have to slap the A string, I sometimes hit the E, so I mute it with my thumb)
#26
I strum the strings really really hard.. Developed from playing without speaker, gets a really clacking noise witch I like, havn't seen any basist except for steve harris do so but i do it kinda different then him. I also strum with my long and ring finger together, using 3 fingers but working as 2. Maybe a bit sloppy looking but I like it
#27
My fretting hand never ventures past the middle of the neck (vertically).

Plucking hand thumb is bent in a kind of j shape when I play, rather than under/across from my middle finger. I've seen a few people who play like that, most jazz guys. It comes from my background in double bass. I also regularly use my thumb to pluck notes.

And apparently my slap technique is completely different than normal
#28
I float when I remember. I used to play REALLY, and I mean REALLY hard. I stopped when I realised Orion could play fast too.

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