#1
Interval | Name | Note.(In C)
-----------------------------------------------
1 | Unison (root note) | C
b2 | Minor Second | Db
2 | Major Second | D
#2 | Augmented Second | D#
b3 | Minor Third | Eb
3 | Major Third | E
4 | Perfect Fourth | F
#4 | Augmented Fourth | F#
b5 | Diminished Fifth | Gb
5 | Perfect Fifth | G
#5 | Augmented Fifth | G#
b6 | Minor Sixth | Ab
6 | Major Sixth | A
#6 | Augmented Sixth | A#
bb7 | Diminished Seventh | Bbb
b7 | Minor Seventh | Bb
7 | Major Seventh | B
8 | Unison (Octave higher) | C
b9 | Minor Ninth | Db
9 | Major Ninth | D
#9 | Augmented Ninth | D#
------------------------------------------------

I took the chart from one of slash_pwns lessons. Now i pretty sure that all the sharp x's flat x+1's are the same note with a different name the only interval im confused on is bb7 can someone explain to me how it is possible to have a Bbb
#2
B is the Major 7th degree of the C Major scale. Bb is the minor 7th degree. And Bbb is the diminished 7th degree. Bbb=A.
#3
Quote by tugb0at
Interval | Name | Note.(In C)
-----------------------------------------------
1 | Unison (root note) | C
b2 | Minor Second | Db
2 | Major Second | D
#2 | Augmented Second | D#
b3 | Minor Third | Eb
3 | Major Third | E
4 | Perfect Fourth | F
#4 | Augmented Fourth | F#
b5 | Diminished Fifth | Gb
5 | Perfect Fifth | G
#5 | Augmented Fifth | G#
b6 | Minor Sixth | Ab
6 | Major Sixth | A
#6 | Augmented Sixth | A#
bb7 | Diminished Seventh | Bbb
b7 | Minor Seventh | Bb
7 | Major Seventh | B
8 | Unison (Octave higher) | C
b9 | Minor Ninth | Db
9 | Major Ninth | D
#9 | Augmented Ninth | D#
------------------------------------------------

I took the chart from one of slash_pwns lessons. Now i pretty sure that all the sharp x's flat x+1's are the same note with a different name the only interval im confused on is bb7 can someone explain to me how it is possible to have a Bbb


A bb (pronounced "double-flat") is just what the name implies. A note lowered two semitones. Now, in your example (Bbb), the interval is a diminished 7th. We use Bbb instead of calling it A because, although they are enharmonic (meaning they sound the same), you have to use the letter name 'B' if you're calling it a seventh. B is seven note names away from C, and it is a major 7th interval. Lowering it one semitone (to Bb) would change it to a minor 7th interval. Lowering it yet again to a Bbb will yield a diminished 7th interval.

Notes like Db and C# (like Bbb and A above) are called enharmonic. This means they are the same note (pitch-wise), but are named differently. This is because intervals are very important. For example, C E G is a C major triad, yes? Well, a C minor triad is C Eb G. But wait, why can't we spell it as C D# G? They are the same notes, yes. But a minor triad is spelled using the root, lowered third, and fifth scale degrees (NOT the root, raised second, and fifth). Make sense? It's all about what you call things.

I hope this helps. I'm not sure if that's what you were asking in your first question, so if you need something clarified, please ask. I'd be glad to help.
#4
exactly as timeconsumer says - i'll add to that tho - any interval can be diminished - it is just most commonly the 7th.

2 semi lower - 1 semi lower - interval - 1 higher
Diminished......Minor...............Major.......Augmented

in the case of 4ths and 5ths there is no concept of major and minor however (since they are based on natural harmonics of open strings rather than the artificial intervals of the other notes) they are called perfect intervals and follow the pattern

1 semi lower - interval - 1 higher
diminshed.......perfect....augmented
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#5
Quote by doive
exactly as timeconsumer says - i'll add to that tho - any interval can be diminished - it is just most commonly the 7th.

2 semi lower - 1 semi lower - interval - 1 higher
Diminished......Minor...............Major.......Augmented

in the case of 4ths and 5ths there is no concept of major and minor however (since they are based on natural harmonics of open strings rather than the artificial intervals of the other notes) they are called perfect intervals and follow the pattern

1 semi lower - interval - 1 higher
diminshed.......perfect....augmented


Yes this is all true. And also keep in mind the key signature when you're working with intervals. All natural (non-altered) intervals in a major key are either major or perfect. Meaning, F - Bb is a P4 (perfect 4th) interval, even though the B has a flat on it. I'm not sure if this would mess you up in the future, I know kids I've taken theory classes with have been confused by this.

A side question by me that could be relevant to OP: Say you're in the key of Gb. A M3 interval would be Gb - Bb. A m3 interval would be Gb - Bbb. A dim3 interval would be... ??? How would you notate that?
#6
I guess it should be Bbbb?.......... But I've never came across that kind of an example. Maybe there's no use of that. But I know that dim3 intervals are important in music.
#7
Quote by YA89
I guess it should be Bbbb?.......... But I've never came across that kind of an example. Maybe there's no use of that. But I know that dim3 intervals are important in music.


I'm assuming Archeo will know the answer if he stumbles on this thread. Him or axemanchris. Or GuitarMunky (however he spells it). I didn't mean to derail the thread, but I think we answered all the TS's questions. If TS needs more help, feel free to ask and I'll just ask in a different thread :p
#8
A diminished third above Gb would be Bbbb. The circle of fifths (overlapping spiral) never ends in either direction.
#9
Diminished third? You can find one between the #6 and the root in any augmented sixth chord.
#10
Quote by Eastwinn
Diminished third? You can find one between the #6 and the root in any augmented sixth chord.


I know they exist. I just wasn't sure about how to notate it in a situation where the major third already has a flat like in the example I gave. So would it, indeed, be a triple flat notated as Bbbb? I wasn't sure if there was another symbol for it (like x is double sharp, not ##).
#11
Quote by timeconsumer09
I know they exist. I just wasn't sure about how to notate it in a situation where the major third already has a flat like in the example I gave. So would it, indeed, be a triple flat notated as Bbbb? I wasn't sure if there was another symbol for it (like x is double sharp, not ##).


A quick Google search didn't bring up good results, so I'd say you'd just have to write it as Bbbb. If, for some reason, you need to write a Bbbb on sheet music, I'd say **** it and just write Ab