#1
Ok so on a piano there are 7 white keys in an octave and 12 semitones total i guess.
Each white key is a step above each previous white key except for B and C/ E and F
So C is a half step above B? F is a half step above E?

I guess what I'm asking is why are b and c/ E and F a half step apart? Is it so pianist no where notes are in relation to where those black key gaps are?

I'm kinda new at this.
#5
The standard keyboard is based on the C major scale, which like all major scales contains diatonic semitones between the third/fourth and seventh/eighth degrees. The basic intervals of the major scale come from the harmonic series, though we typically employ tempered approximations. The black keys fill in the wider "gaps" in the whole tones with chromatic semitones, and eventually the chromatic and diatonic semitones were tempered to the same (or roughly the same) size, allowing for all keys to be playable.

There are also isomorphic keyboards, like the Jankó keyboard, that don't have any C-major bias, giving all dozen semitones a uniform arrangement.
#7
Quote by Dodeka
The standard keyboard is based on the C major scale, which like all major scales contains diatonic semitones between the third/fourth and seventh/eighth degrees. The basic intervals of the major scale come from the harmonic series, though we typically employ tempered approximations. The black keys fill in the wider "gaps" in the whole tones with chromatic semitones, and eventually the chromatic and diatonic semitones were tempered to the same (or roughly the same) size, allowing for all keys to be playable.

There are also isomorphic keyboards, like the Jankó keyboard, that don't have any C-major bias, giving all dozen semitones a uniform arrangement.

I think I understand some of that, despite the fact that every other word is a word i have probably never heard before haha. Thanks
#8
Quote by bagamush
I think I understand some of that, despite the fact that every other word is a word i have probably never heard before haha. Thanks


Well, I explained it about as poorly as it could possibly be explained, though I was trying to do better than that.