#1
So i was jamming on piano using all the white notes doing some funky jazzy improv. How do i determine what mode was being played eg C Ionian D Dorian etc because i wasnt thinking in terms of c major and everything i played on the white keys sounded good.

Also a side question, are all the modes using the same notes like this known as enharmonic equivilants?
#2
read the MT sticky, you most likely weren't using modes. most people don't, they just think they are.
#3
Quote by Serg1
So i was jamming on piano using all the white notes doing some funky jazzy improv. How do i determine what mode was being played eg C Ionian D Dorian etc because i wasnt thinking in terms of c major and everything i played on the white keys sounded good.

Also a side question, are all the modes using the same notes like this known as enharmonic equivilants?


I'd have to see a transcription of what you played. But you were most likely playing in C major or A minor, as those are the notes we naturally want to try to resolve on (in all probablity, let's just say it was C major). Modes are really defined by their harmony, and unless you know the sounds of modes from experience, you need some kind of backing to establish modal context.

Modes using the same notes are called relative modes. i.e. E phrygian and C major are relative modes because they share the same notes. This is their ONLY simliarity, don't get caught in the trap that they're the same scale starting on a different note.

Enharmonic means 2 notes that sound the same pitch but are named differently. i.e. C# and Db are enharmonic. E# and F are enharmonic. Bbb and A are enharmonic.

That help?

EDIT: and +1 to z4twenny about reading the sticky.
Last edited by timeconsumer09 at Aug 6, 2009,