#1
Hey, I've been working on some of my own music with guitar and singing and I really want some solos in my music. I can solo decently if I'm in that "mood" but when I'm really giving it my all, and especially when I'm doing so legato techniques, my left hand starts to strain and I start to wear out. I sorta have the same problem with playing fast 16th notes with my right hand, in solos and in rhythm guitar. What can I do to improve on my playing for both lead and rhythm guitar?
#2
You'll read this everywhere and it's a surprise you don't know: Practice slowly and build up speed. Play slowly so that you can coordinate both hands instead of trying to play fast with cold, untrained hands and injure or tire yourself out. Check out Steve Vai's 10 Hour and 30 Hour Guitar Workouts for plenty of tips for building chops.

Here's just a few quick tips that I used in my practice routine to build chops:

-Practice chromatic exercises across all strings slowly and speed up
-Practice scales the same way
-Practice chord progressions the same
-Play all down strokes as fast you can for 60 seconds on one note or open string palm muted(you'll start feeling it after like 20 seconds but it helps)
-Practice scales and riffs with odd fingers or ones that utilize economical picking

ALSO good posture is a must. Body and hand posture.
" When the power of love overcomes the love of power, the world will know peace."-Jimi Hendrix
Last edited by Warheart1188 at Aug 6, 2009,
#3
Another thing about hand fatigue: Make sure you're not tensing up your hands. Keep your hands loosey-gooosey and you'll feel much better. You might have to back the tempo up a bit, but it is better for your hands.

+1 to practicing slowly, this is a must.
#4
Another another thing about hand fatigue: Keep your hands loose but not cold. Stretching out your fingers and hands works, especially stretching out the webbing in between fingers (to do this look at the picture below). Also rubbing or massaging your forearm can help because it warms up the muscles and tendons that run through to your fingers. You can also soothe your hands in warm water as well but don't ignore any of the other ways.

Stretching out the webbing in between fingers. Do it to each space in between the fingers. Just kind of shove them into each other, stretch them, ya know. A tip my orchestra conductor taught our group.
" When the power of love overcomes the love of power, the world will know peace."-Jimi Hendrix
Last edited by Warheart1188 at Aug 6, 2009,
#5
Quote by Warheart1188
Another another thing about hand fatigue: Keep your hands loose but not cold. Stretching out your fingers and hands works, especially stretching out the webbing in between fingers (to do this look at the picture below). Also rubbing or massaging your forearm can help because it warms up the muscles and tendons that run through to your fingers. You can also soothe your hands in warm water as well but don't ignore any of the other ways.

Stretching out the webbing in between fingers. Do it to each space in between the fingers. Just kind of shove them into each other, stretch them, ya know. A tip my orchestra conductor taught our group.


+1 to this as well. Strech every time you play, it is HUGELY beneficial to keeping your hand fresh and staying away from fatigue.
#6
Playing an instrument is a physical activity and as with all physical activities, it's crucial to start slow and warm up before doing anything difficult or energy consuming. You don't start running full speed until you've stretched your legs, expanded your lungs with deep breaths, and jogged a bit first to get the blood flowing and the body (and mind) ready. Same with music.
" When the power of love overcomes the love of power, the world will know peace."-Jimi Hendrix