#1
K so straight to the point. This might be a stupid question, but still gotta know if this will help. Will playing solo's of other people or in other words solo's of songs i like, help me create my own solo's/improvised licks? Also, how can i make it so i don't run around the fretboard a whole lot, cus i noticed it just becomes inconsistent, and just make it sound good in one place?

What i mean by the later question is, well i received a tip that when improvising i should play with more variety, that is use the whole fretboard and move around a lot. But the more i did it, the more i realized it just starts to sound like a mess if i keep jumping from one side to the other. So how can i make it so i wouldn't have to go around the whole fretboard a lot, that is have a consistent pitch but also make it so there's a lot of variety in those couple of notes i play? I know that i basicly have to apply different techniques, but yet again, when i keep jumping from one technique to another it also begins to sound like a mess
Last edited by Shinami at Aug 6, 2009,
#2
In my opinion, yeah, you can learn from the masters' riffs and then use them in your solos. Also you learn what not to do by listening to rhythm, chords, etc.
Notice that solos are structured, they are formed form licks and riffs, not random notes. Think fast.
Last edited by Fiire at Aug 6, 2009,
#3
It a great exercise to solo over other songs. It is quite fun too. In addition to getting more comfortable moving around the fretboard, you will be able to construct new lines by doing things like trying to immitate the vocal line of the song, which will help develop your ear and sence of melody.
#4
Yes, learn other people's solos. It will give you good experience on phrasing and note choice. Study the notes they choose and why they sound good over the chords that are being played. Study their phrasing.

Almost every solo has highs and lows. This doesn't mean you need to play every note from your lowest open string to your highest fret, but there are natural highs and lows. Just like when people talk, excitement and passion usually raises their voices in pitch, while solemn or other such emotions usually make me think of low voices. This is my opinion, at least. Experiment with making sections of your solos intense and some mellow. This will give you a natural high and low feeling. Don't just run up and down the fretboard for no reason.
#5
What is the main chord progression over the solo you are playing? What key are you in? Knowing those two things help out a lot. Being able to time each part right is a very important part of the solos. It's hard to learn to be musical with solos. Know what the song is about too. Take Pantera's Cemetary Gates for example. Do you see how Dimebag starts of slow and then goes to some really awesome shredding? Well, that's how the whole song goes as well. It starts out slow with questioning the reverend so many things and then a very powerful chord progression of basically yelling at the reverend. It fit the solo well. Does that make any sense? You gotta understand what you are playing, and then for the solo just replace the vocals and make the guitar talk. (And no, using a talkbox does not count for that) Like Angus Young of ACDC. A lot of their songs sound the same, sure, but if you look at their highly popular song You Shook Me All Night Long, his solo in it actually makes the guitar seem as if it is shaking.

Onto your other question about learning. Yes, learn a lot. A big problem guitarists or musicians alike have is they want to create their own stuff, but will stop learning other stuff. I went through a long period without learning anything new and it really hurt me. You gotta keep learning, writing and working on the old and new. But, learning a song isn't the only thing you need to do. You HAVE to be able to take what you learned in X song and make it your own. Like if you want to make a guitar solo like Scarified by Racer X. It's great to learn it to see how Paul Gilbert made it all very musical and all fit in well. Just random shred sounds bad, but when you can at least listen and learn at least parts of what he did, it makes a large difference. Understand?

And by the way, no serious question is dumb.
#6
Quote by Shinami

What i mean by the later question is, well i received a tip that when improvising i should play with more variety, that is use the whole fretboard and move around a lot.


This statement is incorrect - the only reason you need to play horisontally (from 1st fret to 24th fret) is too look flashy. Play box positions meaning vertically and move from there.

Also if you suffer improvising: a) you lack in diffrent licks etc.
b) you can't think fast enough to improvise (not yet)

Practice SLOWLY (and alot) and you will see results.
#7
Yes, playing covers is a good way to improve you're technique and phrasing as well.
You'll also get a better sense of what intervals sound good together, interval inversion, when to use dissonance, chromaticism, etc.

When learning notes on the fretboard, the best way is to use a variety of memorization techniques. Flash cards, printing out note replicas of the fretboard and filling in the notes, playing each note and saying it out loud, and writing down enharmonic formulas worked quite well for me.
After that, learn scale formulas. You really don't need to know EVERY single scale, just how they are formed.
Learn how to create major, minor, pentatonic, harmonic & melodic major and minor, and the modes of each scale.
There's hundreds of scales, but these are the most common ones. Knowing how to form different scales helps spice up your leads, and [knowing the notes] also helps you stay in key when moving up and down the fretboard.

Then you got chord formations, arppegios, modular playing, keys outside of the diatonic realm, and just mad amounts of information.
Start off in digestable blocks or you'll go insane.

This post is all over the place, so take what you can from it.
Take a gander at some of the lessons on this site, both on improving technique and theory, as they are both equally useful. Move at an even pace too, or you might learn some bad habits. Those are a bitch to unlearn, I know.
#8
Quote by Christian Davis
What is the main chord progression over the solo you are playing? What key are you in? Knowing those two things help out a lot. Being able to time each part right is a very important part of the solos. It's hard to learn to be musical with solos. Know what the song is about too. Take Pantera's Cemetary Gates for example. Do you see how Dimebag starts of slow and then goes to some really awesome shredding? Well, that's how the whole song goes as well. It starts out slow with questioning the reverend so many things and then a very powerful chord progression of basically yelling at the reverend. It fit the solo well. Does that make any sense? You gotta understand what you are playing, and then for the solo just replace the vocals and make the guitar talk. (And no, using a talkbox does not count for that) Like Angus Young of ACDC. A lot of their songs sound the same, sure, but if you look at their highly popular song You Shook Me All Night Long, his solo in it actually makes the guitar seem as if it is shaking.

Onto your other question about learning. Yes, learn a lot. A big problem guitarists or musicians alike have is they want to create their own stuff, but will stop learning other stuff. I went through a long period without learning anything new and it really hurt me. You gotta keep learning, writing and working on the old and new. But, learning a song isn't the only thing you need to do. You HAVE to be able to take what you learned in X song and make it your own. Like if you want to make a guitar solo like Scarified by Racer X. It's great to learn it to see how Paul Gilbert made it all very musical and all fit in well. Just random shred sounds bad, but when you can at least listen and learn at least parts of what he did, it makes a large difference. Understand?

And by the way, no serious question is dumb.


Oh damn, I didn't even mention soloing over the chord progression. Counterpoint is very important if you want your solos to be coherent and enjoyable.
#9
Well i know some music theory. Well i know the minor pentatonic and blues scale. If i was given the intervals of some scale, i would be able to construct it, i know how chords are constructed. Also about learning the notes. For some reason i thought that when people improvised they ignored notes, only cared for the pitch. So basically, it's a good idea when playing to say out loud the notes I'm hitting?

P.S I know what key I'm playing in ^_^