#1
im only 16 but i plan on becoming a guitar instructor. yeah, im kinda young to decide what i wanna do but id like to give this shot. i used to want to tour/write with a band but thats just not going to happen with me. even if i just could play a couple of gigs now and again, im happy. right now i plan on going to berklee but i could settle for another college that deals with music. any ideas how i should go about that? also what would i expect as a guitar instructor?
#2
IMO berklee will definitely prepare you well, but if you just want to be a guitar instructor i recommend saving some money by going elsewhere. practice and play... all the time that you can. writing your own stuff would probably help you understand more of the theory end of it, and make it easier for you to explain things or give examples. try to learn different styles as well, so that you can teach any kind of guitar (or at least more than one), because then its easier to get a larger group of students (or for 1 on 1 lessons, many more students)... plus you become so much better at guitar yourself! im not sure what else to say ATM, but good luck!
#3
You're going to have to know an extensive amount of theory and be able to read music fluently in probably bass clef and treble clef. I also think you have to be able to play a secondary instrument that doesn't relate to guitar. You need pretty good technical skill as well as wriing skill too. It isn't easy to get into berklee.
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Last edited by funkbass369 at Aug 6, 2009,
#4
Maybe instead of Berklee you can do Musicians Institute in LA for the Guitar program. Plenty of masters went there. Paul Gilbert spent like a year there a long time ago and now does the occasional lecture there. If you wanna master guitar and theory that would be a good place to do it. Then you can teach after you graduate.
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#5
if you just want to be a guitar instructor berklee will make you an exelent musician but it will put you 200k in debt not joking i almost went there. if you want to go to school for guitar you will need to start studying classical or jazz guitar NOW, or else they arent gonna take you seriously.
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#6
To be a good guitar instructor you need to be at least proficient in most styles (Jazz, Classical, Rock, Blues, Funk, etc. etc.) as well as a multitude of guitar techniques so that you don't confine your students in what they want to learn

You need to know music theory very well: read music well, construct chords, know the modes, altered scales

Know your guitar: know the fretboard like the back of your hand (meaning the notes), and learn your scales in all positions, know a good amount of chord voicings

You should have a good ear so that you can tab out the song the student wants to learn without taking up too much time: this means being able to tell the difference when a guitarist plays it in one position on the neck opposed to another (this just takes a lot of listening and transcribing)

And lastly, you should be patient

EDIT
Oh and you should know many guitarists' different styles of playing so that when you're students learn a Led Zep song for instance they're doing more than learning a song; you should be able to point out important licks and techniques and how you can take them from the song and apply them to their own playing
Last edited by The Horror! at Aug 6, 2009,
#7
Aight lets think about this lil buddy. You want to be a guitar instructor and thats cool. Where? When? How much do you want to be paid? What kinda students do you want? Where do you want to work? What kinda hours do you want? These are the kinda questions you need to have answers to...but fear not.

If you want to instruct in your hometown or something local...put an ad in the paper or advertise however you feel sufficient. Find out what the agency or company you want to work for expects from you to teach for them. My local studio isnt professional in any respect, but we have a very diverse group of students and musical instructors. Most have some professional study (music school, some degree, etc) but not all. Every instructor sits down with me and needs to prove that he or she can correctly and effectively teach the most basic students. If he or she has further talents or aspirations (and there is a demand) we work on that as it comes up. Some teachers are for new students only, some have the ability to push our advanced students...so you can see it depends.

So what do you want? Answer the questions above and you have a decent idea as to whether or not you need Berklee or another school. I live in Boston, so I know all about Berklee. It is my opinion that you better be very serious about your teaching and clientele if you are going to pay for that education. That school will prepare you very well for a career as a teacher, but you must weight the cost/benefit.

Hope this helps,
-John
#8
Quote by kook as kashmir
Maybe instead of Berklee you can do Musicians Institute in LA for the Guitar program. Plenty of masters went there. Paul Gilbert spent like a year there a long time ago and now does the occasional lecture there. If you wanna master guitar and theory that would be a good place to do it. Then you can teach after you graduate.


thanks, sounds good. ill check that out

Quote by maidenpriest69
if you just want to be a guitar instructor berklee will make you an exelent musician but it will put you 200k in debt not joking i almost went there. if you want to go to school for guitar you will need to start studying classical or jazz guitar NOW, or else they arent gonna take you seriously.


honestly the only reason i said berklee is because thats only college of music i heard of. i yet have to figure out where i really want to go. id most likely go into classical. how would i go about doing that? i dont get what you mean by studying a specific genre besides playing lots of it. im really getting into theory finally.

btw, cool user name. Priest and Maiden, my fave. bands

Quote by JS1200_Player
Aight lets think about this lil buddy. You want to be a guitar instructor and thats cool. Where? When? How much do you want to be paid? What kinda students do you want? Where do you want to work? What kinda hours do you want? These are the kinda questions you need to have answers to...but fear not.

If you want to instruct in your hometown or something local...put an ad in the paper or advertise however you feel sufficient. Find out what the agency or company you want to work for expects from you to teach for them. My local studio isnt professional in any respect, but we have a very diverse group of students and musical instructors. Most have some professional study (music school, some degree, etc) but not all. Every instructor sits down with me and needs to prove that he or she can correctly and effectively teach the most basic students. If he or she has further talents or aspirations (and there is a demand) we work on that as it comes up. Some teachers are for new students only, some have the ability to push our advanced students...so you can see it depends.

So what do you want? Answer the questions above and you have a decent idea as to whether or not you need Berklee or another school. I live in Boston, so I know all about Berklee. It is my opinion that you better be very serious about your teaching and clientele if you are going to pay for that education. That school will prepare you very well for a career as a teacher, but you must weight the cost/benefit.

Hope this helps,
-John


wow i got alot to work on
#9
Dude, you keep making threads about this but what you should do is get to WORK!

Just be good and keep an eye on opportunities.
#11
Okay, so you're not looking at the school system. That's a whole other ball of wax. Entirely.

About teaching privately:

First of all, you don't need any qualifications. As long as you can get students, you can teach guitar privately! The challenge is getting and maintaining students.

Your ability to teach comes down to:
-your own knowledge and skill / experience
-your ability to communicate
-how much you care

Your ability to attract students comes down to:
-how much you advertise
-how much your students and colleagues advertise for you (word of mouth)
-your reputation/experience

Your ability to KEEP students comes down to:
-how well you communicate
-how much you care
-how much the student feels he/she is learning

Now, if you have a degree or a certification from Berklee, or experience in a band with a record deal or whatever.... those are things that will help you *attract* students and allow you to market yourself above the others who are doing the same thing. It won't really help you teach or to keep students. Those things are more or less inside you already.

Teaching privately vs. teaching in a store/studio, etc.:

There are advantages and disadvantages to both.

home: advantages - you keep all the money and call all the shots. You set your own hours, send students you don't like to some other teacher, etc.

disadvantages: you have to hustle for every one of your students. You have to chase after people who don't want to pay up. You have to find and make an appropriate space in your home to conduct business. You need to do all your own paperwork if you want it to be legit - paying income tax, setting aside for health benefits, unemployment insurance, etc.

store: advantages: The store gets all your students for you. All you have to do is show up and be prepared. They also provide a space for you to teach. They take care of the business/administrative end of things.

disadvantages: They tell you when to work and who you will teach. They take half of the money (on average).

I know one person who teaches privately in his home. He charges $20 for a half-hour lesson, and has 60 students. You do the math. He has no piece of paper. Instead, he has experience and ability that speaks for itself. (a few gold and platinum albums, world tours, etc.) But no piece of paper. See.... the trick is just having something that separates you from the next person.

That said.... that piece of paper IS definitely one way of differentiating yourself.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#12
I didn't know that the average was half of the money.

I teach a couple students at a studio, and I charge $12 dollars for a half hour lesson. I only pay $2.50 to the studio for each lesson.

To the TS, teaching guitar is not nearly as much about your guitar ability as it about your ability to communicate with the student. Do you currently take lessons? If you do, what is it about your guitar teacher that you like? What is it about your teacher that you dislike? Write these things down. Copy the things that you like and avoid the things that you don't like.

Guitar teaching, like most aspects of the music business, is more about people skills than technical ability.

Good luck, keep us updated on your progress.
#13
Quote by axemanchris
Okay, so you're not looking at the school system. That's a whole other ball of wax. Entirely.

That said.... that piece of paper IS definitely one way of differentiating yourself.


oh, i thought you had have a degree to teach. thats cool but im still going to college. thanks for the tips. it really helped.

Quote by dst127

Guitar teaching, like most aspects of the music business, is more about people skills than technical ability.


im more of a shy person but i think i could be a good teacher. the main thing is that im patient. also i want to teach because just that, i want to. some people just do it for the money and could care less, like my previous instructor


also, my instructor teaches at a local music store, where i take lessons and at a school. he also teaches along with guitar, trumpet and the drums. that being said, should i take up another instrument?
#14
Quote by axemanchris

I know one person who teaches privately in his home. He charges $20 for a half-hour lesson, and has 60 students. You do the math. He has no piece of paper. Instead, he has experience and ability that speaks for itself. (a few gold and platinum albums, world tours, etc.) But no piece of paper. See.... the trick is just having something that separates you from the next person.


So that's $1,200 a week. $72,000 a year. That's a great wage on the face.

Then you realise that you have all the stresses of those students, have to accommodate to each one - this is a full time job. When not teaching you'd probably be thinking about different ways to teach.

And then you think, hey, if I was in any other field and put in this amount of work with my extensive experience, I'd probably be paid a lot more. And you would. Then there's the tax (admittedly worse in Australia than the US).

At the weird thing is that that above wage is the exception to the rule, I would expect the average "guitar instructor" to make maybe 200-300 dollars a week if that, just scraping into minimum wage territory.

Then you realise "hey! why don't I do it as well as something else? that way I can get experience in guitar instructing, while working on a separate qualificiation? That way I can get experience and money in guitar instructing, while enabling me to make money from somewhere else if I can!".

I guess just playing for the love of music looses it's charm once school is out and you have to pay bills and stuff
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#15
^ you make a great point.

i was thinking about teaching at a school as well teaching at a local music store. also the occasional gig now and again.

EDIT:
oh you mean in the summer. well, ill still be teaching at the music store. yeah, i gues i have to think of something else as well. thanks for bringing that up
Last edited by d1sturbed4eva at Aug 7, 2009,
#16
What I mean to say is that teaching guitar;

- may not be for you
- generally doesn't pay much

So you may want to work on something else as well rather than limiting yourself to a lower-paid, hard working job.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#17
You don't need a degree or whatever to teach privately or at a studio or something, but in most parts of the developed world, you DO need a degree to teach in the school system.

And my friend works like a dog... amidst all his students, his band still tours on and off, and they're still releasing albums - a new one in the works right now. He manages the band (most of it, if not all of it), and generally runs the show. He coordinates the website, the on-line sales, etc.

Yes, he is successful, but it is a full time job. He's not the 'basking in the sun sipping Jack Daniels out of a coconut shell" kind of rock star that we like to imagine. His house is nice (it was on MTV cribs), but it is really quite modest, and he has done most of the work on it himself.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#18
Quote by AlanHB
What I mean to say is that teaching guitar;

- may not be for you
- generally doesn't pay much

So you may want to work on something else as well rather than limiting yourself to a lower-paid, hard working job.


i see. any ideas? i have nothing in mind atm

Quote by axemanchris
You don't need a degree or whatever to teach privately or at a studio or something, but in most parts of the developed world, you DO need a degree to teach in the school system.

And my friend works like a dog... amidst all his students, his band still tours on and off, and they're still releasing albums - a new one in the works right now. He manages the band (most of it, if not all of it), and generally runs the show. He coordinates the website, the on-line sales, etc.

Yes, he is successful, but it is a full time job. He's not the 'basking in the sun sipping Jack Daniels out of a coconut shell" kind of rock star that we like to imagine. His house is nice (it was on MTV cribs), but it is really quite modest, and he has done most of the work on it himself.

CT


yeah, i never expected to live an 'easy life' . id practally do anything as long i like what im doing if that makes any sense
#19
Quote by d1sturbed4eva
i see. any ideas? i have nothing in mind atm


You'd know this better than I do. Is there anything you enjoy doing at school? If you like teaching you could get a teaching degree etc but if you like the music industry there are many, many different ways of doing it apart from being a musician.

Edit: Sit down with your mum and one of those University guides which cover all the courses in the country. That should give you an idea what's offered and what you are interested in.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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Last edited by AlanHB at Aug 8, 2009,
#20
Hi!

I just got an article posted on ultimate guitar that you might like to take a quick look at which seems to cover quite a lot of the stuff that is being discussed here such as how good you need to be in order to teach and stuff that you might like to consider as being suitable for first guitar lessons etc?

Good luck with your teaching (it's way better than working for a living!)

http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/columns/general_music/teaching_guitar_for_money_how_good_do_you_need_to_be.html
#22
Good article, but I'm really uneasy with the advertising. Please tone that down. Mentioning a website is one thing, but you mention it three times.... and it is a site that is selling a product or service.

It *needs* to be modified. As it is, it comes across as a blatant spam attack on UG.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#23
Yeah I personally think that articles like that should be removed. It goes against the whole user-created aspect of this site.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#24
I'll give it 48 hrs to be fixed. So... say, noon on Thursday my time. (EST) I'm reluctant to pull it right away because it is an otherwise decent article, and a quick scan of his posts doesn't reveal that he actively spams the board with advertising otherwise.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#25
I can attest to a few things in this thread -

You need to want to teach, care about your pupils and work at your craft. And the money can be very good as you become more established, qualified and competent. My teacher can charge 40 euros an hour for one-on-one tuition, and still has plenty of hours and a waiting list in a recession.