#1
I am teaching myself to read standard notation. I was reading a Petrucci tab and I noticed that 8va thing above some of the notes. I searchbared it and found that it's for notes above the 12th fret? I didn't really get it or how to use it, so could someone explain to me in small words what it means and its' applications?
#3
when you get to the higher notes on a guitar they would be so far above the 5 lines of standard notation that it would just get silly and unreadable 8va means play an octave hight than is written. E.g If you had an E that was written in the top space of the staff then to play one octave up you would just right 8va over it rather than draw 5 extra lines.

If you want to go up 2 octaves that's 15va
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#5
Easy to understand, bitch to read and play on the fly
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#6
Quote by Chikao42
Easy to understand, bitch to read and play on the fly


Actually, its a lot easier to read than all the ledger lines youd need otherwise
#7
tru tru - but counter intuitive sometimes when only a few notes in a run are 8va'd and the melody goes up but the notation drops down - thankfully they're not found too much in piano music which is the sheet music i mainly read :P
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#8
^True, but that has more to do with the composers inability to notate in a way that makes sense than a problem with the 8va.
#10
Just take whatever music you have and read it an octave up.

I know this doesnt help, but one day I just woke up and could do it lol. Thats kind of how reading music goes. You try to learn for a while and suck, and then one day you can just do it
#12
It's not something you can't already do - if you can read music and know where the notes are on the fretboard then you can do this - just remember to play it an octave higher than it's written. simple as.

for examples take any song that has solos written in the upper frets of the high E string, get them in GP or powertab, show the sheet music and you'll hopefully see more 8va than you can shake a stick at
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#13
Easy octave trick...

Imagine the 12th fret as the nut of your guitar, and therefore representing the open strings. The 13th fret is now the first fret and so on. Now play....

CT
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#14
here's a tip, get used to playing an octave above whats written cause guitar is tuned an octave down from concert, and most composers don't think about poor little guitarists.
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