#1
It's been bugging me,you know? I basically have to be finished with all this college crud by January to be cleanly accepted,but I have no idea which field I want to study. Jazz or Classical.

For one,I hate Jazz for the most part,its not a pain to my ears,but it doesn't interest me at all,on the other hand Classical is also quite boring to me,but I do dig some of the players,and I have a thing for neoclassical metal. Problem Is I don't want to be bothered with that type of theory that I would never use,nor will I need to finger pick,as I plan on being a Rock Musician. I think maybe jazz might introduce me to the necessary technique and skill set (advanced picking techniques,in depth look at scales and modes,and all things shred) but what a boring platform to be learning this on...

:| Wish they'd have a blues or rock course set. Which do you guys think would best suit my needs as a soon-to-be rock guitarist? Jazz training or Classical?
#4
i play indie hard rock and my knowledge of jazz theory has been immensely helpful. just because you don't like something doesn't mean you can't do something useful with it. besides, jazz is sexy
Harlington - Indie/Progressive/Hard Rock

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#5
Since when do you need a degree to be a rock star? And this is coming from someone getting a music degree. The reason I'm doing it is because I'd like to open my mind to new kinds of music, and also have a backup job teaching if being a full-time musician doesn't work out.

Also, there is a great deal of classical music theory that I can easily apply to rock. Classical guitar will also do wonders for your left hand technique, it did for Petrucci.
#6
Quote by pwrmax
Since when do you need a degree to be a rock star? And this is coming from someone getting a music degree. The reason I'm doing it is because I'd like to open my mind to new kinds of music, and also have a backup job teaching if being a full-time musician doesn't work out.

Also, there is a great deal of classical music theory that I can easily apply to rock. Classical guitar will also do wonders for your left hand technique, it did for Petrucci.


This is all totally true. Every bit of it. But if you aren't willing to open your mind to music styles besides rock and blues, you're really only hurting yourself. Theory, jazz, and classical music can help you IMMENSELY when it comes to technique and songwriting, if you're willing to let it.
#7
Quote by metallifan3091
This is all totally true. Every bit of it. But if you aren't willing to open your mind to music styles besides rock and blues, you're really only hurting yourself. Theory, jazz, and classical music can help you IMMENSELY when it comes to technique and songwriting, if you're willing to let it.


couldnt have said it better myself. I make a living playing/ producing music, and my advice is to Never ****ing limit yourself. Everybody can play blues rock, it's nothing special. Take it from me, versatility gets you jobs. I would say pick both jazz and classical, if you want to be a serious musician, why wouldnt you try to learn as much as possible, unless your just lazy. and f.y.i. if you want to be a rock star... you're gonna need more than a degree in jazz/ classical music.
Last edited by pepsi1187 at Aug 7, 2009,
#8
Quote by metallifan3091
Sounds to me like a music degree may not be the best thing for you


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#10
Jazz > TS

You do realize that Jazz music has a huge influence on other forms of music, right? Same with classical. Aspects of both appear in other musical genres! Oh my gawd!
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#11
I don't like to listen to much jazz, though I find it heaps of fun to play. It's so hard as well.

Good luck.
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#12
Classical and Jazz are there because rock/metal guitarists use those skills from those genres. I'm thinking of going into college/university for a music degree because I would love to be a heavy metal guitarist and this would help me a lot. My only problem is that I've been only playing for a year and a half so I'm stressed out because I need to improve my guitar playing in addition to learning music notation as well as Music Theory. If your like me I would choose Classical but if I can have both then I will.
#13
I didn't like jazz either before I started this music orientated high school(or what its called). Now I've learned quite a bit and it REALLY helped me. It is the most complicated music to play. atleast theory wize and maybe technically as well and if you can bring some aspects from Jazz into rock music it's gonna be pure win. Look at Guthrie Govan for example; he's playing fusion with a lot of inspiration from JAzz. Jazz is the grownup genre
#14
Wow.....

The only thing I'll add here is to ask, "Why are you considering either? Or more to the point, why are you considering getting a degree in this?"

A degree won't help you as a rock musician. Playing and networking will. Sure, yes, study... but study what you want to learn. In fact, getting a degree when you want to be a rock musician might even be counter-productive. Sure, it will solidify your technique, definitely. But there's more to being a rock musician than technique.

Especially when you are asked, "what kind of rock musician?" Like in a recording act with a record label? Like Paul Gilbert? Like a session musician? Like the guy in your town who gets called to sit in for live work, or who plays in six different bands and is always showing up on the radar?

CT
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#15
Don't bother with either. In fact, if all you plan to do is be a professional rock musician (lol) don't even bother going to college. In less, of course, you intend on dropping out, cause that'll rock.
#17
truthfully id go jazz, classical is nice and all...but it is terribly boring (to me) but i do think it would be usefull to pursue a little classical training simply for the extreme technical training some pieces use.
#18
Quote by Sami Philadelph


For one,I hate Jazz for the most part,its not a pain to my ears,but it doesn't interest me at all,on the other hand Classical is also quite boring to me,but I do dig some of the players,and I have a thing for neoclassical metal. Problem Is I don't want to be bothered with that type of theory that I would never use,nor will I need to finger pick,as I plan on being a Rock Musician.


Based on your statements, I'd say neither. Find something you like and do that.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Aug 7, 2009,
#19
I would have picked Jazz personally because I love jazz, but you don't seem to like either so why bother?
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#20
Quote by metallifan3091
Sounds to me like a music degree may not be the best thing for you



this.

But yeah. do jazz.
#22
Lol,thanks for the responses guys,and I understand where people are coming from as far as the opening my mind up,but thats why I'm here,my mind is open,its just reluctant. I simply wanted to know,as a rock musician (specifically Metal,and its subgenres) which would benefit me more,Classical training or Jazz training. I understand where everyone is coming from,but being open minded isn't going to make me like either,its just not my cup of tea. My grandfathers being drilling Pat Matheny in my head for years as well as other jazz musicians,but It's just not my type of music,I can appreciate the technique,as well as the culture that surrounds the genre,but It's not me. With classical on the other hand,I haven't been exposed to much besides the basic scales and stuff you have to go through maybe t o learn a song or what not. BUT,I need one of them in order to help build my technique to its maximum potential,I know this,I just want to know which one will put me on the right track to having the most appropriate and efficient technique and skill-set for Metal.

And to answer that one guys question,I'd love to be a rock star,but my eyes are more set on session work,tech jobs,and behind the scenes stuff. I'm also taking a hand full of classes in commercial songwriting,general music this and that,and audio engineering,as I'm sadly too cynical to rely on my wankery and move to L.A. with "big rockstar dreams"
#23
If you dislike listening to jazz, don't do a jazz degree... simple as that. You can learn all the scales, and you can learn all the theory, but you pick up so much from just listening to jazz records, it bridges the gap between learning the theory and effective improvising. It is quite laughable to consider it if you dislike it.