#1
Ok 2 things, I was comparing strings on a guitar with a keyboard to better understand the guitar and I realized that there are 2 1/2 steps between each guitar string i.e.

A-(1/2)-A#-(1/2)-B-(1/2)-C-(1/2)-C#-(1/2)-D = total of 2 1/2 steps

D-(1/2)-D#-(1/2)-E-(1/2)-F-(1/2)-F#-(1/2)-G = total of 2 1/2 steps

okay but then between the G string and the B string there are only 2 steps on a piano

G-(1/2)-G#-(1/2)-A-(1/2)-A#-(1/2)-B = total of 2 steps

Is this so A guitar can end and begin on an E string?

Would a guitar sound bad if it went with the 2 1/2 pattern for every string?

i.e. EADGCF


Q#2

Is the low E string (0 fret) one octave below the 12th fret of the low E string and 2 octaves below the high E sting (0 fret)?


I'm new to playing music, so sorry for all the questions.
Last edited by bagamush at Aug 7, 2009,
#2
Well you can tune it to E A D G C F. But you'd have to rewrite every chord and scale. Some musicians do tune it their guitar to that and are rather skilled with it.
#3
Quote by Haedadru
Well you can tune it to E A D G C F. But you'd have to rewrite every chord and scale. Some musicians do tune it their guitar to that and are rather skilled with it.
But why isn't that standard tuning?
#4
Tuning is the way it is because of the chords. It's easier to play in EADGBE than in EADGCF. Example: any barre E-shaped major chord.

Q#2: Yes. It's open E, then octave higher 12th fret on E string (or 2. fret on G string), then one more octave higher there's 24th fret on E string or open E string (the lighter one).

edit: about that answer before mine...scales and chords stay the same. Same notes, different frets. So you have to change your scale and chord shapes. Although the scales would probably be somewhat easier played on EADGCF tuning, chords would be much harder (or even impossible) to play in that tuning.
Last edited by -Rodion- at Aug 7, 2009,
#6
Quote by -Rodion-
Tuning is the way it is because of the chords. It's easier to play in EADGBE than in EADGCF. Example: any barre E-shaped major chord.

Q#2: Yes. It's open E, then octave higher 12th fret on E string (or 2. fret on G string), then one more octave higher there's 24th fret on E string or open E string (the lighter one).
Very helpful thank you
#8
i lived in the same house as california guitar trio for a week this summer. apparently they use "new standard tuning" which is tuned in perfect 5ths (except the last string which is a minor third interval)

CGDAEG

according to wiki:

The lowest four strings are tuned just like a cello, i.e. in fifths from a low C. The second string is another fifth up from the A to an E, and the first string is a minor third up from the E to a G. Since the lowest five strings are tuned in fifths, typical fingerings for chords and scales used on the violin, cello, and mandolin are applicable here. The minor third between the top strings allow denser chords in the high range of the scale, and easier access to some elementary chord tones (typically the thirteenth for chords with the root note on the sixth string, and the ninth and flat ninth for chords with the root note on the fifth string, see chord). NST has a greater range than the Old Standard Tuning, approximately a perfect fifth (a major third lower and a minor third higher).

Scales across two strings in NST also line up nicely into coherent tetrachords or four-note patterns that have a visually rational relationship (whole and half-tone relationships have a remarkable symmetry that can be easier to learn than the OST whose intervals from 6 to 1 have the (inconsistent) major third thrown in the middle of the scale.

This fifths-based tuning does present a downside, however: wider harmonic intervals between consecutive strings make certain closely-voiced jazz chords impractical requiring an interpretive voicing on the part of the guitarist.
#DTWD