#1
Hey dudes/dudettes,

I am very interested in learning by ear so that I can transcribe tabs here on Ultimate and be able to play the music I hear in my sleep That sounds crazy but whatever lol

And I dunno what's a good ear training program?

I've found one at cyberfret but dunno if it's any good

If you have any recommendations please recommend away.

Love, Matt
#2
The best way to train your ear is to learn songs by ear. Start with easier stuff then gradually get harder. wouldnt hurt to know your theory, thatd make it a load easier.
#3
ive found best way to do it is to pick a song with an easily heard lead riff. and then tab it.
something like dammit by blink 182. people dont just tab songs perfectly straight away so just pick an easy song and experiment with each note on your neck until it sounds right to you.
then check if you got it right on ug if you want
#4
Try some of these: http://www.trainear.com/, http://www.musictheory.net/trainers/html/id90_en.html, http://www.good-ear.com/servlet/EarTrainer, http://www.learn2hear.org/, http://eartoner.sourceforge.net/ (this one you can't use in your browser). Some of these have different features (some have chords, some don't) so make sure you check them all out and find which one best suits your needs. I hope this is what you were looking for
Last edited by the white baron at Aug 7, 2009,
#6
Quote by connorhxcchaos
The best way to train your ear is to learn songs by ear. Start with easier stuff then gradually get harder. wouldnt hurt to know your theory, thatd make it a load easier.

This is really the best way. Ear trainers will help you recognize intervals, chords etc. but it's not the same as transcribing songs with different instruments. Just start out easy and work your way up.
Quote by thsrayas
Why did women get multiple orgasms instead of men? I want a river of semen flowing out of my room to mark my territory.

You can play a shoestring if you're sincere
- John Coltrane
#7
I use Ear Master, it's pretty good. The basic version allows you to test intervals from unison to an octave, and the Pro version is up to 3 octaves (ascending, descending, and harmonically). It's not free, but since I re-install Windows all the time anyway, that's one way for me to get around the trial.

What 7even said was right though, recognizing intervals in programs and songs is a little different. The easiest way is probably to start with the basslines from pop songs.