#2
I listen for 1 note I can recognize then follow what is logically reachable from there
#3
Quote by theGlitch
I listen for 1 note I can recognize then follow what is logically reachable from there

This.

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#4
I open up a tab and practice each part until i can play all the parts that i want.

i wish i could do it that way ^
#5
Start by figuring out key, tempo and time signature and things like that. Then just work from there. I like to write things in Finale so i can play them back, to check for mistakes etc.
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#6
Quote by theGlitch
I listen for 1 note I can recognize then follow what is logically reachable from there



This is what I usually try to do. I'll usually put the parts I'm trying to figure out in Guitar Pro. Generally I get the entire song figured out before I actually learn how to play it, if that makes any sense.


Quote by Phat Stud 55
When I'm trying to learn a song I use audacity to remove vocals and slow it down so I can learn it.



But how do I do this? I've used Audacity for years and didn't know I could do that with the vocals. Also how do you slow it down without changing the pitch?
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Last edited by yellowshirtguy at Aug 7, 2009,
#8
Pick around until I stumble onto one of the notes, find the melody line, then the key, then listen for chord changes, and get the tempo, feel, and dynamics soon after.
#9
i listen a bar or 2, maybe 4, then pause and play untill i got it, then check and write it down, on to the next set of bars.
i like knowing the chords first so i just pause after every couple of chords and play untill i got them.

pretty straightforward and pretty easy so i try to get 8 bar sets at once whenever i can
#10
work out vocal melody then
listen for root notes, then chord types major/minor etc
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#11
Quote by guitar-guy01
work out vocal melody then
listen for root notes, then chord types major/minor etc


How do you go about this? A lot of people seem to say it but I can rarely get it down.
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#12
Quote by yellowshirtguy
This is what I usually try to do. I'll usually put the parts I'm trying to figure out in Guitar Pro. Generally I get the entire song figured out before I actually learn how to play it, if that makes any sense.


But how do I do this? I've used Audacity for years and didn't know I could do that with the vocals. Also how do you slow it down without changing the pitch?

I don't know about removing vocals, but to change the speed, highlight the area of the track that you want to slow down, then choose "Change Tempo" from the effects menu.

On topic, I memorize what I'm trying to figure out first, then I try to find the note(s) that the part I want to figure out starts on (usually takes a while ). Then from there, just sound out the intervals from note to note.

Quote by b4t3man
How do you go about this? A lot of people seem to say it but I can rarely get it down.


What are you having trouble with specifically? I find it the same as transcribing a guitar or bass part. In a way, it's just another instrument.
Last edited by kirbyrocknroll at Aug 9, 2009,
#14
I put the song on and pick up my guitar and go at it. If it's difficult I'll have to play along with it quite a few times to get it down, but I can get simple songs the first time.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
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#15
Quote by 7even
Start by figuring out key, tempo and time signature and things like that. Then just work from there. I like to write things in Finale so i can play them back, to check for mistakes etc.


That's my method. I listen without an instrument and get all the framework down, such as key, time signature, tempo, yadda yadda yadda. Then I get the root movement of the chord progression. After that I learn the actual chords, then I learn the melody, and then all the other parts.
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#16
I try and figure out where the E is then tune the guitar to there then try and figure out the next note, like others have said. Go where it's most logical to go after that. I'm not saying I get it right though
#18
I usually play the song and play over it a little with my guitar until I can find the key, I can tell because I can play from a scale or whatever without it sounding bad. My ears aren't good enough to recognize key without an instrument, and I'm terribly bad with pitch, so I can't ever tell if I'm matching the same note as the song. Than I just go at it. After I think I've got it, I'll check the tabs to see if I'm right, because I'm usually off in pitch at a few parts. I figured out 'Prayer Of The Refugee' last week, but was playing the entire solo a whole step higher than I should have!
Last edited by morrock at Aug 9, 2009,
#19
what I use to do was listen to the first four bars or the main riff ... focus on the first chord/note and figure out what strings are being used and get a general idea of where the notes could fall ... then based on the band i'm listening to I'll use the chords that they generally use in their songs if I can't immediately get a grasp of what type of chord it is ....... then from there it varies, sometimes I might try out typical progressions or try to figure out the interval
...
then I'll have whatever section I'm working on play through my rp500 before I use to just have it play through the amp, have my head phones plugged and play what I've figured out so far along with the song and from there figure out what's missing
.
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the rp500 helped in this regards since I could match the tone which makes it a whole lot easier
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Something that someone recommended to me was to listen to the bassline and play it on the sixth string to help figure out the key/chords