#1
So i notice that even in basic blues solos, it is quite common to go in and out of minor and major scales. Im not really sure when i can make these changes. For example if you were playing minor blues and jamming predominantly in that minor key, would you jump to major over major chords in the song. What is the common wat to approach this?
#3
Quote by pepsi1187
you play what ever ****ing sounds good



thanks so much
#4
Quote by Serg1
thanks so much

/sarcasm?

i would like to know this too, but just for soloing in general.
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#5
I like to play in the major for the I bar, switch to minor for the IV then use whatever I feel like for the V.
Last edited by whitenihilist at Aug 7, 2009,
#6
Quote by whitenihilist
I like to play in the major for the I bar, switch to minor for the IV then use whatever I feel like for the V.



but what if you are constantly changing chords every few beats? how does it work in jazz?
#7
Quote by Serg1
but what if you are constantly changing chords every few beats? how does it work in jazz?


That is a tough question, I am predominantly a blues/rock player, so I don't encounter constant chord changes that often.
#8
Quote by Serg1
thanks so much


im being serious. there are no rules to follow. you work out your licks note for note until it sounds good.
#9
Quote by pepsi1187
im being serious. there are no rules to follow. you work out your licks note for note until it sounds good.
OR you work out some sort of methodical approach so you're not throwing darts blindfolded.

TS, actually the blues are famous/infamous for being extremely forgiving in the way of tonality. In a major blues, it really sounds fine to use the minor pentatonic scale the entire way through, despite the clashes between the major third of the I chord and the minor third of the scale, among other things. No one REALLY knows why. In a minor blues, on the other hand, the chords are more straight up minor, so you're really not going to want to be using, say, the C Major Pentatonic over a C Minor blues.

Outside of the blues, it is what it is. Minor harmony is minor harmony, major harmony is major harmony. There's a very common usage of the "blue" note, which is the minor third in a major key, or the diminished fifth in a minor key, that, by evident consensus, sounds bluesy. Outside of that though, the chords don't lie. Most modern top 40 rock tends to be almost entirely diatonic, so leaving the key/scale(other than the "soulful" bend to the blue note) is difficult to do without sounding contrived. The chords essentially all stick to one key, and to try to "overthrow" the harmony the chords are laying out for you would be counterproductive to say the least.

However, in genres like jazz, in which the chords themselves don't rigidly adhere to any particular key, what you do is run with the chords. For instance, a common(admittedly not jazz) progression might be something like C E7 Am G. Those chords are centered around the key of C Major, but the E7 is something of a black sheep. It has a G# in it. Without delving too far into it, you could very well use an A Harmonic Minor scale because it has a G# in it and very nicely leads into the A Minor chord.

Also, your original question about "jumping to major over major chords". You shouldn't be looking at chords individually when considering general what to do so much as a progression as a whole. For instance, over Am F C G, you don't play the A Minor, F Major, C Major, and G Major scales. The progression as a whole is an A Minor(some would say C Major) progression, so you play A Minor(some, again, would say C Major) over the entire thing.
Last edited by grampastumpy at Aug 7, 2009,
#10
So what scale makes sense that includes a D, F#, A, C, and Eb(the notes of a D7b9)? G Harmonic Minor is very commonly used in a circumstance like this, over that particular chord.


Actually over a dom7b9 chord most jazz players would use a half-whole diminished scale... harmonic minor would be an incredibly rare soloing choice indeed.
#11
Quote by Serg1
So i notice that even in basic blues solos, it is quite common to go in and out of minor and major scales. Im not really sure when i can make these changes. For example if you were playing minor blues and jamming predominantly in that minor key, would you jump to major over major chords in the song. What is the common wat to approach this?



Well, if your soloing over dominant 7th chords (like ALOT of blues), both the Major and minor pentatonic scales can work, which is way you'll often here guitarists going back and forth between the two.


If it's minor blues..... just use minor pentatonic.

Quote by grampastumpy
O, actually the blues are famous/infamous for being extremely forgiving in the way of tonality. In a major blues, it really sounds fine to use the minor pentatonic scale the entire way through, despite the clashes between the major third of the I chord and the minor third of the scale, among other things. No one REALLY knows why.


Well, the reason why it works is that both scales give tones that work over the dom7 chord

minor pentatonic ..... R #9 4 5 b7


Major Pentatonic ......R 2(9), 3, 5, 6(13),


If you want the #9 sound, minor pentatonic is the way to go.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Aug 7, 2009,
#13
Quote by Sam_Vimes
Actually over a dom7b9 chord most jazz players would use a half-whole diminished scale... harmonic minor would be an incredibly rare soloing choice indeed.
a) I figured rather than introduce a probably new scale I'd just present one that would fit the situation that most people would be familiar with.
b) It's not rare at all.

And apart from this point, I did change the post. I gave a more straight-up example that might be a bit easier to grasp.

Munky, I guess you're right. I haven't really thought terribly deeply about blues theory.
Last edited by grampastumpy at Aug 8, 2009,
#14
There are a couple a common ways to approach blues soloing.

1. The place were many people start will be applying the pentatonic associated with the key and stick solely to that or it's blues equivalent. This is the "gritty" sound associated with the blues.

So you play the A minor pentatonic/blue over a blues progression in A.

2. Next you can use major or minor scales to solo over it. As mentioned before this is because the blues is "extremely forgiving in the way of tonality". I have never studied music theory formally but I just say if there's a distinct absence of 3rds in the backing, that is there are predominantly 5th chords happening, you can then create your own feeling of a key upon them. If you use a major scale, it has a major feel, if you use a minor scale, it will have a minor feel. You are supplying the 3rds through your solo so you effectively dictate the flavour.

So you can play the A minor or A major scales over a blues progression in A. You can use both if the backing is predominantly playing 5ths.

3. You can use Mixolydian scales, and can switch between them all the time during the song. Think of it as a combination between the major and the minor pentatonic scales, because it's the major scale with a flatted 7th. However it can get a bit tricky with the shifting backing because you should shift to the scale associated with the chord underneath it to avoid clashing notes.

So say you have a progression which goes A7 D7 E7;
- During the A7, you should play the A Mixolydian scale
- During the D7, you should play the D Mixolydian scale
- During the E7, you should play the E Mixolydian scale

Note that it isn't necessary to have 7th chords underneath the associated scales, as it would negate the possibility of using the pentatonic scales in this environment. However I doubt it would work well over a blues in a predominantly minor key.
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