#1
I've been told a lot I play very 'scalar', and I would like to get away from it. I haven't exactly 'Broken Out Of The Box' yet, even though I know every mode on the fretboard. Any tips on playing melodically, like examples? Or just lots of practice?
#2
melodic and soulful playing isn't about practising or examples.

It's about heart and feel for the music.
#3
^What that guy said, was, use bends, slides, legato, big intervals and stuff like that
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#4
blues
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#6
Dont stay in your boxes and standard positions. Up and down the fretboard within a scale or mode can help...I like using the lowest and highest note possible in a scale
#7
Quote by Shadow1121
I've been told a lot I play very 'scalar', and I would like to get away from it. I haven't exactly 'Broken Out Of The Box' yet, even though I know every mode on the fretboard. Any tips on playing melodically, like examples? Or just lots of practice?


Learn what a melody is.

Learn to play melodies on your guitar (rather than just a scale)

it has nothing to do with "breaking out of a box".... it has to do with your awareness of a particular musical concept, and your ability to utilize it.

articulations like "bends, slides, legato" may enhance your melodies, once you know what they are and start making them, but on their own, they will not make you sound more melodic. Same with "interval leaps".


Suggestion....

once you are familiar with what a melody is...... start learning and memorizing melodies on your guitar.

^ spend some quality time with this before you move on to improvising your own.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Aug 7, 2009,
#8
Quote by GuitarMunky
Learn what a melody is.

Learn to play melodies on your guitar (rather than just a scale)

it has nothing to do with "breaking out of a box".... it has to do with your awareness of a particular musical concept, and your ability to utilize it.

This. Improvising over actual music helps you to practice and recognize good melodic ideas as well
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#9
Yes...I've downloaded some backing tracks and I've been practicing with them lately.

But yeah, I think I have to find a melody, using big intervals, bends, slides, etc...
#10
In addation to my first post:

This may sound a bit weird, but try blues. And when you are playing, try to make the guitar, cry, scream, tell a story.... express yourself like a singer would using bends, vibrato, hammers and pulls etc...
#11
Quote by Shadow1121
Yes...I've downloaded some backing tracks and I've been practicing with them lately.

But yeah, I think I have to find a melody, using big intervals, bends, slides, etc...



For starters, what you need to do is just .... find a melody .... period.

Then when you have that concept down, you could start to embellish your melodies with articulations like bends and slides. Big intervals are used sparingly in most melodies. Not a great place to start IMO.
shred is gaudy music
#13
think of a decent melody and sing it or hum it. this shouldnt be too hard

now play it on the guitar.
#14
Improve your phrasing. If you sound "scalar" it's most likely because it sounds like you're just going up and down scales. Break up the notes and make sentences and stories. If you don't get what I mean, listen to some old saxophone players or violinists.
Corona Corona
#15
some of the simplest things make the best melodies. Notes from the major scale, think of the simplest melodies (nursry rymes etc) twinkle twinkle. They are easy to identify for non musical minds. The MELODY should be the most important part of a composition. Usually it is a vocal melody. Think about when you whistle a tune, it is always the melody, usually vocal, not the progression or rythm. You should actually write the melody, then build the song around it, not write some lick and use that as the basis as most bands do now.
#16
Quote by ShoeFactory
think of a decent melody and sing it or hum it. this shouldnt be too hard

now play it on the guitar.


That is incredibly hard without a tape recorder - try it at home kids!

Good advice, but use a tape recorder to tape your voice first.
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#17
playing good melody is about realizing that there is something in the world that is greater than yourself


and while this sounds easy and cheesy it is indeed very complicated and desirable

my two cents.
#18
This has nothing to do with the guitar, if anything it's making things worse. Like Shoe Factory said put the guitar down, put on a backing track and try to think of a melody, then try and sing it.

At the moment you're not thinking, your just mindlessly moving your fingers - if you can't first create music without the guitar you'll never do it with it either. Get an idea in your head first, and then worry about what you need to do on the guitar to make it happen. At the moment you're just following patterns, running through your arsenal of techniques and hoping something good comes out.
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#19
Quote by AlanHB
That is incredibly hard without a tape recorder - try it at home kids!

Good advice, but use a tape recorder to tape your voice first.


This.

Whenever I think of a melody and try to play it on my guitar, I often hit the wrong note and then forget the melody altogether and just fall back into the earlier traps of muscle memory. Recording it is probably a good idea.
#20
you can play melodies 1st on a piano , here you have no string bending , other techniques or minor pentatonic neck diagrams to rely on .
just learn famous melodies , nursery rhymes , classical motifs , tv themes anything really ,
stuff written for flute or violin single note instruments , play them with one hand on the piano/keyboard then take them to the guitar .

these are just my suggestions , they work for me , i hope they work for you too .