#1
Go get your metronome and put it on like 70 bpm or so.

Now play any note/chord/muted string/s on each quarter note for 8 beats. Now do the same thing, but do 8th notes for 8 beats. Now triplets for 8 beats. Now 16th notes for 8 beats. Now do 16th note 5lets for 8 beats. Now 16th note 6's. Now 16th note 7's. Now 32 notes. Keep going and if your a beast you can make it too 11's.

Trust me, its a LOT harder then it sounds to make them all the notes even and the transitions flawless
#2
Playing groupings of 11 at any high tempo (16ths or above) requires you to be the master of space and time. seriously. I can do 16th note septuplets at that tempo. I'm not a fast picker, so my 32nds aren't always perfect. 11s are out of my league. seriously, you'd have to be a drummer to do that.

Ew.
#4
Umm ... thanks? I think most of us here already know how hard something like that can be.
#5
Quote by pwrmax
Umm ... thanks? I think most of us here already know how hard something like that can be.


The point wasnt to say "look at how hard this is."

It was just to give you a cool, and more importantly, tough rhythm exercise
#6
Odd note groupings played accurately are a great way to increase your picking accuracy, as well as giving you odd groupings to play during solos. I love the sound of groupings of 5's and 7's when shredded.
#7
Quote by timeconsumer09
Odd note groupings played accurately are a great way to increase your picking accuracy, as well as giving you odd groupings to play during solos. I love the sound of groupings of 5's and 7's when shredded.


Hell yes. 5s are the best tuplets.

By the way, to one poster, its funny you mention drums. I original took this exercise and applied it to my practice pad to practice rudiments.

For triplets, I did swiss army triplets. The 16th notes were paradiddles. The 5s were egg beaters. The 6's were paradiddlediddles. And the sevens were just a standard 7 stroke
#8
Drummers and their crazy names... Guitarists should have crazy names like that. I'm gonna do a swiss army Am arpeggio of DOOM.

But honestly, this is great practice. My brother is a drummer and I take lots of the rhythmical things he does that I think sound cool and practice them on my guitar, you know? Similar to this.
#9
Quote by timeconsumer09
Drummers and their crazy names... Guitarists should have crazy names like that. I'm gonna do a swiss army Am arpeggio of DOOM.

But honestly, this is great practice. My brother is a drummer and I take lots of the rhythmical things he does that I think sound cool and practice them on my guitar, you know? Similar to this.


Its amazing what you can learn about rhythm with a pair of sticks and a practice pad
#10
Quote by tubatom868686
Its amazing what you can learn about rhythm with a pair of sticks and a practice pad

+1111
being a drummer for a couple years before i started guitar has made me so much better with rythyms. (and i still cant spell the damn word right)

but its so fun to try and make crazy meshuggah style riffs in like 13/8 over a 5/4 beat.

drums are so much fun.
so is guitar.....
so is piano.....
so is singing....
i need some friends....
my 6 best friends:
Ibanez Artcore AF75
Schecter C-1 Hellraiser
LTD H-207 7 string
Ibanez Acoustic
#11
yes its an unmissable exercise, but you forget the most important part, combining them

so play quarter on 1 beat, eights on second beat, triplets on third beat, etc etc
and mash them up too, does wonders for your phrasing

when you find yourself making a mistake, for example between triplets and 16ths or whatever, practise alternating just those two
#13
Quote by WishfulShredder
I actually find this easier to do than say, bebop synchopation.
not that I actually have the technical ability to pick 11s that fast...


Id be interested to hear how bebop syncopation is different from any other syncopation.

Also, the question isnt can you do it. The question is can you do it perfectly clean and with flawless transitions
#14
Quote by tubatom868686
Id be interested to hear how bebop syncopation is different from any other syncopation.

Also, the question isnt can you do it. The question is can you do it perfectly clean and with flawless transitions


well, hard synchopated stuff, like latin rhythms, and like stuff in charlie parker tunes etc.
I find I can do it pretty well though. the trick is to count the next subdivision in the sequence before it actually happens.
#15
Quote by WishfulShredder
well, hard synchopated stuff, like latin rhythms, and like stuff in charlie parker tunes etc.
I find I can do it pretty well though. the trick is to count the next subdivision in the sequence before it actually happens.


Dont even get me started on latin/african rhythms lol. Do you know what timbau is? Its a bassists nightmare.
#16
I actually do this on a practice pad and thought one day hey why not guitar? Now when you can apply this to music, now you are having fun... And yes, latin rhythms have to be a gift from god, or maybe the devil.
#17
+1,000,000 to this suggestion. This is great practice, and agreed 11's are insanely difficult. I have a simpler version I practice from time to time where I go from 5's to 6's and back every beat - it takes a lot of concentration, and it's great for your control of your picking.
#18
there is a great al dimeola lesson on timing.

try tapping your foot when you play. if you watch paco de lucia he tapes two 8th notes at the start of the bar which is very difficult to do while playing. internalises your rhythm a lot.