#1
How can i learn ear training if im totally 100% tone deaf please i need tips to continue playing guitar.
#2
If you're tone deaf, you can't enjoy music. You'd hear nothing but noise.
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breaking guitars
#3
I'm not very knowledgeable on the subject. However, I don't believe you can train your ear on your own. I think there is a way to correct tone deafness, but I'm not positive. Perhaps you should research the topic.

Either way, I wish you the best.
#4
That sucks dude. =/
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#5
Let's determine first, if you are, in fact, tone deaf. The reason I suggest this is that 'tone deaf' is an expression that is used a lot, but is almost never applied correctly.

Play the first string on the guitar. Now play the sixth. Do they sound the same to you? If they do, you are tone deaf. If they sound different, then you're not.

If you are tone deaf, I really don't think there's much you can do. If you're not, there is a LOT you can do to practice.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#6
I once read on Wikipedia that Robert Fripp was tone deaf when he started playing. I used to think you can't overcome it, but apparently you can.
#7
i dont know if its just me but as i progressed playing guitar, i hear more when listening to music.
#8
Learning to sing has helped my ear *immensely.*

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#9
Quote by d1sturbed4eva
i dont know if its just me but as i progressed playing guitar, i hear more when listening to music.
Yeah this. Just practice. Here's an ear-training website if you want to check it out: http://www.good-ear.com/
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
#10
So basically you want to know if you can run a race with no legs, am I right?
Call me Batman.
#11
Quote by J.A.M
So basically you want to know if you can run a race with no legs, am I right?
Nope. You can train your ear. You can't grow new legs.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
#12
You aren't tone deaf, if you were you wouldn't derive any joy form music, and you wouldn't be interested in playing an instrument. You just have a undeveloped ear, but that's ok lots of people (including many guitar players who have played for years LOL) have that problem and it can be remedied with practice. Do a search for "ear training" and you will find loads of material.

Things that really really really help:

Transcribing - this is the best thing, start with simple melodies and move your way up

Singing - play something and try to sing it, sing something and try to play it, try to sing something you hear while listening to music

Ear trainer programs - there are lots of these, they drill you on intervals, chords, etc...

Careful listening - when you listen to music try to separate the parts in your head, listen to the melodies and imagine what they would look like on a music staff (going up, down, curved?) Also listen to many different types of music, and music that involves varying instruments

Do these things regularly and you will notice tons on improvement. If you make it a part of you daily regimen you will end up with a great ear and be a lot better than most guitarists because most guitarists neglect ear training.
Last edited by Loves Me Trike at Aug 8, 2009,
#13
Hi, i'm worried about it too Mista Jones... I dunno how bad my musical ear is. I did the test axemanchris mentioned but it's not clear to me... I mean the two notes are on the same frequency and I know they are both E notes being played but obviously the low e string is much more bassy and produces a heavier sound. If a person was tone deaf would they not be able to make this distinction or am I tone deaf because I feel that they are the same note?
#14
Quote by Kaizen1989
Hi, i'm worried about it too Mista Jones... I dunno how bad my musical ear is. I did the test axemanchris mentioned but it's not clear to me... I mean the two notes are on the same frequency and I know they are both E notes being played but obviously the low e string is much more bassy and produces a heavier sound. If a person was tone deaf would they not be able to make this distinction or am I tone deaf because I feel that they are the same note?


You aren't tone deaf!!!! They ARE the same note, in different octaves.

People who are tone deaf can't differentiate pitches. Play a C note, then play a D. Do they sound different? You aren't tone deaf.
Last edited by Loves Me Trike at Aug 9, 2009,
#15
Quote by axemanchris


Play the first string on the guitar. Now play the sixth. Do they sound the same to you? If they do, you are tone deaf. If they sound different, then you're not.


Maybe you should have suggested them to try two strings that aren't tuned to the same note. The same notes in octaves do sound the same in one sense, but not the other. It would be confusing to someone new.
#16
Fair enough.... but yes, I did mean 'identical' as opposed to sounding like the same note two octaves apart.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#17
If you were truly "tone-deaf", I think there would be a lot more things to worry about than your guitar skill. Actually I'd be very surprised if you were interested in playing guitar at all if you were.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#18
You are definately not tonedeaf.
Try this test:
http://www.nidcd.nih.gov/tunetest/dtt.asp
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#19
Everyone already has a good ear.

You just need to make a structure in your mind from 'sound --> note'.

If you can hear when something is out of tune, or when something sounds like "a wrong note", then you can learn it.

Just start transcribing, and resist the temptation of cheating by looking at the tab.

After a few weeks or so (depending on ur intelligence/learning speed), ur brain will "notice" that it needs to use the ears, and that there's "no other way".

After that, your hearing will develop (gets more "attention" from your brain), and you will gradually get better with it.

You just have to "Force" ur mind into using ur ear.

Secondly


I also suggest that you play scales up and down and sing/hum along with it.

This will also develop a kind of pseudo-visualisation of notes/sound.

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Last edited by xxdarrenxx at Aug 9, 2009,
#20
im pretty sure its impossible to be tone deaf. because i read somewhere that if you were actually tone deaf you couldn't recognize musical notes or be able to diffrentiate between people's voices on the telephone and stuff like that. the problem's with your brain's circuitry working on ear training is probably gonna help. but i reserve the right to be completely wrong so google up and verify the thing i said about tonedeafness being fabricated
#21
I'm not sure how you wouldve started playing guitar if you were tone deaf?
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