#1
Well, seeing as I'm a bass player, I don't mess with chords much, but, obviously, I should still have a good understanding of them (especially considering I write guitar parts, but it would be useful anyways). What I don't get is how they get their names. I know the intervals, so I get the obvious ones (C5, B major third, et cetera), but I don't get ones like augmented, diminished and suspended chords; how do they get their names?
#2
Wikipedia!

No really, typically the explanations are okay, but some of them blow. Check and see if you understand them.
#3
Quote by Eastwinn
Wikipedia!

No really, typically the explanations are okay, but some of them blow. Check and see if you understand them.

Wow, I'm actually surprised; the explanations they had actually seem pretty helpful. I'll just post what I got from it here to double check it.

Suspension is a note played as part of a chord that isn't supposed to be part of it; something that's added in, right?

Augmented and diminished are just raised or lowered by a semitone. I don't get this however; why not just call the interval what it's changed to? Although I do understand it in the context of augmenting or diminishing a chord.
#4
Quote by herby190
Wow, I'm actually surprised; the explanations they had actually seem pretty helpful. I'll just post what I got from it here to double check it.

Suspension is a note played as part of a chord that isn't supposed to be part of it; something that's added in, right?

Augmented and diminished are just raised or lowered by a semitone. I don't get this however; why not just call the interval what it's changed to? Although I do understand it in the context of augmenting or diminishing a chord.


Suspension is usually a term for when you replace the 3rd of a chord with a 2nd or 4th.

Augmented and diminished chords are specific types of chords 1-3-#5 and 1-b3-b5 respectively. but also the terms augment and diminish are used in the context of expanding or shrinking intervals.

Just read up more on chords and intervals.
#5
Quote by herby190
Wow, I'm actually surprised; the explanations they had actually seem pretty helpful. I'll just post what I got from it here to double check it.

Suspension is a note played as part of a chord that isn't supposed to be part of it; something that's added in, right?

Augmented and diminished are just raised or lowered by a semitone. I don't get this however; why not just call the interval what it's changed to? Although I do understand it in the context of augmenting or diminishing a chord.

Suspended chords have a suspended note, like you said kind of "that isn't supposed to be part of it", in place of the 3rd. Back in the classical music era the note came from a previous chord and had to be resolved.

Chords aren't named by intervals, even though their quality is dependant on their intervals if that makes sense.
EDIT, yeah what trike said
Last edited by AF.Mice Elf.ro at Aug 9, 2009,