#1
So, umm.. this is a really stupid and quite frankly, newbie question.

Take, for example, the C major scale.

Major scales are constructed with a whole, whole, half, whole, whole, whole, half note set right?

Now, my question.. is that only to be played on one string? Like, say I played a C from the fifth string, first fret. Can I go on to play a D on say.. the second string, fifth fret? Or do I have to follow along that one string (the fifth string) in the "W, W, H, W, W, W, H" fashion for it to be considered a scale?

Like I said, probably a retarded/newbie question.
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#2
no you dont have to play them on 1 string, the box patterns are the standard way of learning scales
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#3
So, I could technically start with a C on any string, then go to a D on a totally different string, then an E on a totally different string, etc?
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#4
theres no d at the fifth fret on the second string *assuming your in standard tuning*i fyou mean the fifth string *the a string* then yes you could play that. C-D-E-F-G-A-B-C anywhere on the neck is part of the c major scale
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#5
Well, remember, with the notes you listed you're jumping octaves

If you want to play directly up the scale in one octave, then you have to play the correct note in the correct octave

For instance you could go from C on the sixth string eighth fret to D on the tenth fret OR C on the sixth string eighth fret to D on the fifth string fifth fret OR to open string D because those D's are the exact same note and in the same octave: no matter which of those three notes you play you're still going a whole step up from C

If you played a D tenth fret first string, it would be up a whole step AND two octaves

No matter what octave the D note is in though, the note is still part the scale
Last edited by The Horror! at Aug 9, 2009,
#6
Quote by TechnoLp
theres no d at the fifth fret on the second string *assuming your in standard tuning*i fyou mean the fifth string *the a string* then yes you could play that. C-D-E-F-G-A-B-C anywhere on the neck is part of the c major scale


He called the fifth string the second string and second string the fifth string, honest mistake

EDIT sorry for double post
Last edited by The Horror! at Aug 9, 2009,
#7
Ah I see, well thanks guys . And ya, that was a mistake on my behalf, my bad xD.
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#8
Yes, scales are just a sequence of notes - the way the guitar is constructed means you have multiple options for playing those notes.
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