#1
So I want to learn how to play blues. I've learned and can solo with my pentatonic scales in 4 positions (on acoustic so position 5 is out of reach), but would like to know how I can go from one position to another and play all sorts of crazy solos all over the fretboard. Let me know! Thanks! I should go learn some music theory hmm...
#2
Quote by Luong
So I want to learn how to play blues. I've learned and can solo with my pentatonic scales in 4 positions (on acoustic so position 5 is out of reach), but would like to know how I can go from one position to another and play all sorts of crazy solos all over the fretboard. Let me know! Thanks! I should go learn some music theory hmm...

Read my thread called "Using the whole fretboard for writing music". (Click on this to view it)

It contains a lot of information on that. Good luck.
#3
learn where all the notes are, for instance learn where the A is on each string, then B, etc... it will teach you to find your place anywhere on the fretboard. and learn the 5th position
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#5
Quote by nrc141
and don't do that...

I wasn't advertising my thread just for the purpose of advertising. I was trying to be helpful. That thread contains very helpful information, in it i asked (about) the same question as the guy here and got a LOT of useful information on it, so i'm sharing the thread with him. So please, do view that thread as it contains a lot of information you're looking for. (Just not quite on the first page.)
The quotes in my sig are from that thread.

Or do you mean putting whole blocks of text as a link? I do that all the time.
Last edited by robinlint at Aug 9, 2009,
#6
Quote by Luong
So I want to learn how to play blues. I've learned and can solo with my pentatonic scales in 4 positions (on acoustic so position 5 is out of reach), but would like to know how I can go from one position to another and play all sorts of crazy solos all over the fretboard. Let me know! Thanks! I should go learn some music theory hmm...


The single most important thing you need to realise to be able to use the whole neck to solo is that there are no "positions" no "boxes" and no "shapes", just scales. The notes exist all over the fretboard and that's what you need to be familiar with; the whole neck, not a series of shapes. When you have a solid grasp of that you realise that you're not trying to move from one position to another, you're just moving around the notes that are available to you in different ways.
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#7
Interesting! How do you suggest I learn these all of these notes and where they exist? Do I find a diagram of the whole fretboard and simply memorize it?
#8
Quote by Luong
Interesting! How do you suggest I learn these all of these notes and where they exist? Do I find a diagram of the whole fretboard and simply memorize it?

I know there are many ways to approach this, of course. People seem to achieve whole fretboard knowledge in many different ways. I can only speak for what works for me.

But learning all the positions individually is where I started. Making sure to learn the intervals, scale degrees, etc, in each position. Then I pick two adjacent positions and learn to meld them in such a way that I can move between them fluidly. Learning how they mesh together. Then repeat that until I know all the positions and how they mesh.

All that is much easier, I find, when I use 7, not 5, positions. With 7 positions (3 notes per string and the berklee patterns, in my case), the patterns overlap such that you can shift or slide from one note up/down to the next note and end up exactly in an adjacent pattern.

Whole fretboard knowledge was built up from pieces, in this way, for me. Now I can slide all over the place without getting lost. I think trying to learn the entire fretboard all at once is too much to handle, at the beginning.

I'd add that it's very useful to look at the scales and how they are laid out on the fretboard in many different ways. In particular, what they look like on one string. Or just two strings, and so on.

I also found that learning various arpeggios in all positions really helped as well. You need to be really clear where the various notes are in the scales. If you know the scale patterns, but have no clue where the thirds, fifths, sevenths, etc, are located, then you'll have trouble getting the most out of those scales.

This is something that takes years, so don't despair too much. Enjoy the journey.
#9
Quote by Luong
Interesting! How do you suggest I learn these all of these notes and where they exist? Do I find a diagram of the whole fretboard and simply memorize it?

In addition to what Grep said, please DO check the thread, do not ignore it. It contains information on all of this, and has answers to the questions you are asking right now. Why? Because i asked them in that thread.

But if you really don't want to view the thread, here's a short summary:
It's indeed true that you need to break out of the patterns and start to realise a scale is a selection of notes that sound good with eachother. If you learn that, plus all the notes on the fretboard (Which i haven't yet but am going to. I have only learnt a few strings), you'll only need to know what key a song is in and what chords they play. Based on the key, you know what scale to play inside of, and thus what notes sound good with the chord progression or the song. Then just improvise using only those notes, and there you have it.

However, for blues, about everything they use is pentatonic major and minor, and the blues scales (correct me if i'm wrong, i don't like blues, but my dad plays it a lot), so if you're only going to be playing blues, you need to learn very few scales.

Now please check the thread. There's a lot more information like this there.
Last edited by robinlint at Aug 9, 2009,
#12
Learning the notes all over the fretboard is a lot easier if you learn the relationships between the different strings. Start out by learning the notes on the low E string (6th) between the open position and the 12th fret (they repeat after that point). Now the 4th string - the D string - has the same notes as the E string except 2 frets higher. So an A on the E string - 5th fret - appears on the D string at the 7th fret, except one octave higher.
So, from learning the low E string, you kind of get the D string for free. The 2nd string - the B string - has the same notes as the D string, except 3 frets higher this time. The same relationship exists between the 5th, 3rd, and 1st strings.

As a first step towards breaking out of the pentatonic box shapes that you've learned, experiment with coming up with licks that move between neighboring boxes. Here's a really simple example, starting with the Am pentatonic box shape at the 5th position, but halfway through sliding over and using the shape at the 7th/8th position.


4/4
  Gtr I
  E E E E E E E E  E E  E  E
|--------------------8-10S12----|
|-------------------------------|
|---------------8-10------------|
|---------5-7S9-----------------|
|-----5-7-----------------------|
|-5-8---------------------------|
#13
no one said theory? theory helped me a ton. you dont have to memorize boxes and patterns just the formulas for the scales. and still the fretboard. :/ i still dont have the fretobard memorized per say but i could find any note on it. just might take a minute
#14
You guys are overcomplicating it. If you learn all the notes on 1 strings you should know where they are on the other strings. If you want to play over the whole fret board find ways to transform from one scale into the next. For example Sliding, bending, skipping strings.. all sorts of things you can do. You DO NOT have to memorize all the notes in the scale (although it is helpful if you learn other scales other than the 7 modes). You just simply have to get patterns and licks you like and move them all around using techniques you enjoy hearing. Simple.
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#15
hey im really interested in this thread and i just looked at a diagram on google of the notes on the fretboard...2 questions: does every note have only 3 octaves, and why is there no B#? sry im a noob at theory
#16
There is no such thing as B#, and you will also find out that there is no such thing as an E# either. They do have flats however (you will see them as A# or D# often), so don't fall for that trick.

As for octaves, I think there has to be something in the vicinity of 4 or 5 for each note. I could be wrong. I don't really think about how many octaves there are - I just worry about how to get to the next octave if I need to.
#17
really, theory is the shizzle. Some people may find it like studying a school subject or something but it really does wonders for anyone who enjoys playing guitar but wants to be able to do anything other than just learn songs. It helps you improvise, compose and learn to play what sounds good (although it's important not to neglect your ear).
this lesson will get you well on the way, and really it does open up a whole new door.

A way I practice moving across the whole fretboard is by going through the entire scale on all the different strings one at a time; then taking the scale notes in one position one two or three strings and ascending then shifting up a position and descending and keep on going and alternating.

example G minor pentatonic

e|----------------------------------------------------------
B|----------------------------------------------------------
G|----------------------------------------------------------
D|---------3-5/8-5------------------7-9/11-9----------------
A|-----3-5---------8-5---------7-9-----------12-9-----------
E|-3-6-----------------7-5/7-9--------------------12-9------


And then you do the opposite direction going down the fretboard and you also do it on each different three sets of strings, you can also do it in sets of two or four strings, change the key, change the scale, play it accenting different notes or with legato, do it with three notes per string and economy pick it, try and do it doing sweep picking (ie 1 note per string, I haven't tried that but I'm sure it's possible)etc

Really helps teach you your way around the fretboard and how to connect the scale in your playing
^Note: Probably sarcastic
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#18
Quote by HoffManCometh
There is no such thing as B#, and you will also find out that there is no such thing as an E# either. They do have flats however (you will see them as A# or D# often), so don't fall for that trick.

As for octaves, I think there has to be something in the vicinity of 4 or 5 for each note. I could be wrong. I don't really think about how many octaves there are - I just worry about how to get to the next octave if I need to.
There is a B# and an E# and you can get double flats too - they aren't used often but they exist and are needed for some scales. B# is the same pitch as C (they are enharmonic) but the different names are used depending on the context.

Edit:
Quote by guitar_loner
hey im really interested in this thread and i just looked at a diagram on google of the notes on the fretboard...2 questions: does every note have only 3 octaves, and why is there no B#? sry im a noob at theory
A 24 fret guitar has a 4 octave range
Last edited by zhilla at Aug 10, 2009,
#19
Quote by zhilla
There is a B# and an E# and you can get double flats too - they aren't used often but they exist and are needed for some scales. B# is the same pitch as C (they are enharmonic) but the different names are used depending on the context.

Edit:A 24 fret guitar has a 4 octave range


Sure, there technically is a B# and E#, but it's like calling it a different name. I can't remember where I read it but it depends on whether there's an F#/C# in the scale/key already, right?
#20
Quote by HoffManCometh
There is no such thing as B#, and you will also find out that there is no such thing as an E# either. They do have flats however (you will see them as A# or D# often), so don't fall for that trick.

As for octaves, I think there has to be something in the vicinity of 4 or 5 for each note. I could be wrong. I don't really think about how many octaves there are - I just worry about how to get to the next octave if I need to.



There's plenty octaves depending on how many frets you have. There's also a unison for each note. (which is exactly the same note)
Gear

Jackson DKM2 Dinky, Seymour Duncan Pickups, Jackson Patented FLoyd Rose, Maple Neck
Line6 Spider III, Line6 FBV footboard, BOSS SuperShifter PS-5
Tascam US-122, ZOOM Rythmtrak RT-123, Zoom MRS-4 MultiTrak
Drumsite, Audacity
#21
Quote by xIxLxCDTxxx
There's plenty octaves depending on how many frets you have. There's also a unison for each note. (which is exactly the same note)


Plenty of octaves, but I wasn't asking how many there were, someone else was. To follow up on that anyway, it's usually 4 to 5 anyhow because most people only use 21 to 24 frets. Unless you're crazy and get one of those washburns that have 28 frets!