#1
hey ive been playing for a year now and have just started incorporating scales and i came across something that confused me.

ive been playing the lydian scale in the key of D and i like it alot. but then i noticed that the aeolian scale in the key of F#/Gb is the same. how can this be? ive realized the only differences are the root notes for each scale.

so what im starting to get at is whats the significance of these root notes. thanks
#2
Root note is the note you're centring things about. D lydian has the same notes as F# aeolian, but they're not the same thing- if your chord progression is a modal one in D, it's D lydian, if it's in F# it's F# aeolian.

Take a look at the modes sticky up the top of this forum.
#3
Quote by BobbyAndCambria

so what im starting to get at is whats the significance of these root notes. thanks


That they show you what scale it is? D lydian should be played over a D lydian modal progression. F# aeolian should be played over F# minor tonal progression.
#4
That is the same thing as the C major scale being the A minor scale. What scale u play depends on the key of the song. Also you can play an A minor scale of a song in the key of C major. It will just sound dark and dreary as opposed to if you were playing some happy major chords. If you look at all the modes you will see that they are all the same notes just with a different starting root.

C Ionian (Major) D
D Dorian E
E Phrygian F#
F Lydian G
G Mixolydian A
A Aleoian (Minor) B
B Locrian C#

So i mean you can take the D major scale and do the same thing as i did above hope this helps you out.
#5
No you can't, it will sound no different - if you're in the key of C major then the notes C D E F G A B are the C major scale, A minor doesn't even exist inthat context.
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#6
Quote by BobbyAndCambria
so what im starting to get at is whats the significance of these root notes. thanks


Good question. The root note is where the scale resolves. Play the major scale from the root and stop at the last note -- that last note (the leading tone) wants to pull towards the root note. Do it again, hang on the last note, and then play the root again. What you hear is resolution. Play this progression: Dmaj7 - E7 - A. That resolves on A. Play it a few times in a row and try ending it on Dmaj7. It doesn't sound complete. Then try ending it on E7. Definitely doesn't sound complete. If you end it on A, it should sound complete.

Just to test yourself, where does this progression resolve: E - B - C#m - A? This one isn't as strong. Repeat it and end it on different chords in the progression to find which one sounds the most resolved.

So, since scales always resolve on their root note, and the root note is what's different about D Lydian and Gb Minor, then the difference between those two scales must be where they resolve.
#7
First of all Lydian and Aeolian are modes and unless you're playing modal music you shouldn't be worrying about these yet. You are playing A major which have the same notes and intervallic steps as D lydian but shouldn't be confused.
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#8
Quote by 7even
First of all Lydian and Aeolian are modes and unless you're playing modal music you shouldn't be worrying about these yet. You are playing A major which have the same notes and intervallic steps as D lydian but shouldn't be confused.


oh thanks ill use a major and learn about modes another day lol
#9
Quote by 7even
First of all Lydian and Aeolian are modes and unless you're playing modal music you shouldn't be worrying about these yet. You are playing A major which have the same notes and intervallic steps as D lydian but shouldn't be confused.


What? Whats important is harmonic context. If hes playing D Lydian in a D major harmonic situation its going to sound like D Lydian. Just because it is a mode of A major doesn't mean it has anything to do with A major.
#11
Quote by BobbyAndCambria
im confused. i think im gonna burn my guitar lol or smash it over my head


You shouldnt be, the whole point is that the sames notes doesnt necessarily mean the same scales. Cmajor and Aminor share the same notes, but the first you play in the context of Cmajor (resolve to C which is the root) while the latter you should play in the context of Aminor (resolve to A which is the root). The same counts for D Lydian and F# aeolian (natural minor), although it's a bit more complicated due to the nature of modes. For modes read the sticky.
#12
Quote by BobbyAndCambria
oh thanks ill use a major and learn about modes another day lol


Don't listen to that guy, he has no idea what hes talking about.
#13
im playing D lydian. but i dont know much about root notes or chord progressions so i might think im playing D lydian but im actually be playing f# aeolian or a major
#14
Quote by BobbyAndCambria
im playing D lydian. but i dont know much about root notes or chord progressions so i might think im playing D lydian but im actually be playing f# aeolian or a major


Well you need something to define the tonality. It could be chords, a droning note or just emphasizing the root of the scale.
#15
Quote by Loves Me Trike
What? Whats important is harmonic context. If hes playing D Lydian in a D major harmonic situation its going to sound like D Lydian. Just because it is a mode of A major doesn't mean it has anything to do with A major.

Unless the piece is modal he's playing A major or F# minor.
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#16
Quote by BobbyAndCambria
im playing D lydian. but i dont know much about root notes or chord progressions so i might think im playing D lydian but im actually be playing f# aeolian or a major


No, you cant actually be playing a F# aeolian if you're playing D lydian, because the latter implies that the root is D, so it resolves to D. In you're case, where you dont know much about chord progressions, you can hear where the scale resolves to.
Does the scale resolve to D, you're playing D lydian, if you resolve on a F#, you're playing F# aeolian. The thing that makes you resolve to either two is the harmony.
A D lydian modal progression would let the scale resolve to D while a progression in F# aeolian would let the scale resolve to F#.
#17
Quote by Loves Me Trike
Well you need something to define the tonality. It could be chords, a droning note or just emphasizing the root of the scale.


by chords i assume you mean for another guitar part? and whats a droning note lol and how do i emphasize the root.

haha sorry
#18
Quote by BobbyAndCambria
and whats a droning note


Sustaining a note

Quote by BobbyAndCambria

lol and how do i emphasize the root.


Play it a lot and on strong beats.
#20
Quote by BobbyAndCambria
oh i think i get it now. this is definitely D Lydian haha


Which chords are you playing over if i may ask?
#21
Quote by 7even
Unless the piece is modal he's playing A major or F# minor.


That makes no sense. The fact that those are rearrangements of that scale is irrelevant if D is the tonality. If hes playing D lydian its going to sound like D MAJOR with an altered (#4) tone.
#22
If the piece is modal yes, otherwise it will resolve to either A major or F# minor.
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#23
all ive written with this scale is just a small rhythym riff. there chords that i dont know they name of lol i should i tab them out?
#25
Quote by 7even
If the piece is modal yes, otherwise it will resolve to either A major or F# minor.


Lmao, WHAT?

You have all this ass backwards. If there is a D tonality, and you play D Lydian, it will be in D MAJOR. The fact that it is a mode doesn't hold much significance. Its better looked at as an altered D major scale, it doesn't have a designated point of resolution, that is determined entirely by the harmony.

Modal music is just harmonically static, and it works there AND it also works with traditional harmony.
#26
its basicall a 5 on the A string, and i go around with 7,6 and 4 on the G. andi add little things. but being that the 5 on the A string (its a D!) is played the whole time its being its being emphasized thus making it D lydian. i think
#27
Quote by Loves Me Trike
Lmao, WHAT?

You have all this ass backwards. If there is a D tonality, and you play D Lydian, it will be in D MAJOR. The fact that it is a mode doesn't hold much significance. Its better looked at as an altered D major scale, it doesn't have a designated point of resolution, that is determined entirely by the harmony.

Modal music is just harmonically static, and it works there AND it also works with traditional harmony.

It would just sound as D major with an accidental. Not the same thing as D lydian.

I read a great article on the subject by Ed Byrne not to long ago, but i can't seem to find it. I'll have a look for it.
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#28
Quote by 7even
It would just sound as D major with an accidental. Not the same thing as D lydian.



Maybe if you are a pedantic nerd and feel it MUST be "modal" because the textbook name for it is "mode". Its the exact same sound, just because you might use other chords does not mean you can't imply that sound in a D major context. The thing you said about it resolving to A or F# minor is completely wrong though.