#1
Can someone tell me why on pianos B and C/ E and F are only a half step apart? and why they don't use blacks keys to represent that?
#2
Because there is no note between B and C, but white keys are all the notes in the key of C major, and since B and C are both in the key of C major, they're still white.
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#3
So your saying that if C was a black key then c# would have to be a white key and then that wouldn't work? So it was built around C major and that's why there are no sharps or flats in there because the (2212221) 1's happen between bc/ef
#4
Why is there no note between b and c? Is C just B# sharp but they call it C?
#5
Well the notes are based off their frequencies, and there is no note between B and C. C and B# are "enharmonic", meaning same note, different names. It depends on your key.

If you are in the key of Bb Major, a C is a C. But if you were in, say, C# Major, you'd have a B#, you wouldn't call it C because C isn't in the key of C#.
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#7
Its because the white keys are based on the major scale, and the points with no black keys between are the 2 half step intervals in that scale.
#8
Why is there no note between b and c? Is C just B# sharp but they call it C?
If I remember right, some Greek chap (Pythagoras maybe?) started off by notating the natural notes (A B C D E F G), then people later noticed that you could have the same relationship between notes, but start from another note, hence altered (sharp/flat) notes to get scales like C minor and A major.

PS, C is enharmonic to B#, not B## (typo in your post?).
#9
Quote by bagamush
Why is there no note between b and c? Is C just B# sharp but they call it C?
Take a look at a keyboard (I posted a picture at the bottom). Find a C, and play seven white keys going up from that note. The notes you are playing are C D E F G A B and then back to C. This is a C major scale, consisting of W W H W W W H (w=whole step, h=half step). That is the formula for a major scale. The reason I gave you the C major scale instead of the D major scale or F major or something, is because C major is the only major scale that uses no sharps or flats.

Now that you know this, take a look at a guitar, for now we'll look at the sixth string. The open string is an E, as well as the twelfth fret. Knowing that, there are 12 notes in between, (E, F, F#/Gb, G, A#/Bb, B, C, C#/Db, D, D#/Eb) going from the open string to the 11th fret, after which it repeats. Now let's take an E major scale. It has the same intervals, or formula, as the C major scale (because they're both major scales) but it starts on a different note. The notes are E F# G# A B C# D#, and I posted an image of it at the bottom.

Does that make a bit more sense?





Quote by MopMaster
If I remember right, some Greek chap (Pythagoras maybe?) started off by notating the natural notes (A B C D E F G), then people later noticed that you could have the same relationship between notes, but start from another note, hence altered (sharp/flat) notes to get scales like C minor and A major.

PS, C is enharmonic to B#, not B## (typo in your post?).
Yep, it was Pythagoras.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
#10
Oh I know the major scale intervales octave oct 8 natural notes C D E F G A B C
12 notes all to gether and how it relates to guitar, 12 fret 1 octav higher. 24 fret on low E equals open high E 2 octaves. I just didn't know why it was based on a major scale i just thought it was wierd that it wasn't something like WWWWWWW rather than WWHWWWH
#11
Quote by MopMaster
If I remember right, some Greek chap (Pythagoras maybe?) started off by notating the natural notes (A B C D E F G), then people later noticed that you could have the same relationship between notes, but start from another note, hence altered (sharp/flat) notes to get scales like C minor and A major.

PS, C is enharmonic to B#, not B## (typo in your post?).

yeah typo
#12
Quote by bagamush
Oh I know the major scale intervales octave oct 8 natural notes C D E F G A B C
12 notes all to gether and how it relates to guitar, 12 fret 1 octav higher. 24 fret on low E equals open high E 2 octaves. I just didn't know why it was based on a major scale i just thought it was wierd that it wasn't something like WWWWWWW rather than WWHWWWH


A lot of people argue that it shouldn't have been based on the major scale. Check out http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Janko_keyboard

Lizst and Arthur Rubinstein (both world class piano virtuosos) agreed that it was a much better layout but it never caught on because the old layout was so well established.
#13
Quote by Loves Me Trike
A lot of people argue that it shouldn't have been based on the major scale. Check out http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Janko_keyboard

Lizst and Arthur Rubinstein (both world class piano virtuosos) agreed that it was a much better layout but it never caught on because the old layout was so well established.
Wow that is very interesting, I was wonder why the piano is layed out how it is and I guess the answer is just "because." That's a pretty cool looking piano too bad it never caught on, thanks.
#14
Quote by Loves Me Trike
A lot of people argue that it shouldn't have been based on the major scale. Check out http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Janko_keyboard

Lizst and Arthur Rubinstein (both world class piano virtuosos) agreed that it was a much better layout but it never caught on because the old layout was so well established.


6-6 keyboards just make more sense. A regular 7-5 is like having a dozen different instruments, with a different fingering pattern for every key. The time spent learning all of those patterns could be better applied.
#15
Quote by Dodeka
6-6 keyboards just make more sense. A regular 7-5 is like having a dozen different instruments, with a different fingering pattern for every key. The time spent learning all of those patterns could be better applied.

I think the bigger problem is that anything over a 9th is really uncomfortable for anyone who isn't a mutant
#16
Quote by Loves Me Trike
I think the bigger problem is that anything over a 9th is really uncomfortable for anyone who isn't a mutant


I'm not sure if that is worse than the lack of uniformity, but I definitely agree octaves are spaced too widely on a typical 7-5 keyboard - often on the order of 6.25 inches. A Jankó could be comfortably spaced at 5 inches, which would allow a single hand to cover an 11th in about the same span as a 9th on a 7-5.
#17
Quote by MopMaster
If I remember right, some Greek chap (Pythagoras maybe?) started off by notating the natural notes (A B C D E F G)


Why would a Greek chap have used the Latin alphabet to name notes?
#18
Quote by Dodeka
I'm not sure if that is worse than the lack of uniformity, but I definitely agree octaves are spaced too widely on a typical 7-5 keyboard - often on the order of 6.25 inches. A Jankó could be comfortably spaced at 5 inches, which would allow a single hand to cover an 11th in about the same span as a 9th on a 7-5.

I can just barely reach an 11th but it's uncomfortable.