#2
They contain the same intervals, but the major scale functions in tonal music and ionian in modal.
#3
Quote by KillahSquirrel
They contain the same intervals, but the major scale functions in tonal music and ionian in modal.

What does that mean?
#5
What does that mean?

It means that in tonal music (the vast majority of music composed), the major scale is used. In modal music, Ionian is used, even though both have the same intervals between their notes, and could therefore be considered the same scale, they're used in different contexts.

Before learning about modes, I would also suggest taking a look at the link deHufter posted, and make sure you have a solid idea about other things in music theory first.
#7
Quote by Loves Me Trike
Don't be confused by pedantic nerds that talk about "modal music". They are exactly the same.


Yes, for all intents and purposes. But each name is used in different circumstances, just like the eharmonics (B#/C, E#/F)
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#8
Context is very important in music, and it certainly affects whether it should be called Ionian or Major.

And if he's getting confused by that, he should not be ready to learn about modes.
#9
Quote by Loves Me Trike
Don't be confused by pedantic nerds that talk about "modal music". They are exactly the same.
:P
#10
Quote by KillahSquirrel
Context is very important in music, and it certainly affects whether it should be called Ionian or Major.

And if he's getting confused by that, he should not be ready to learn about modes.


Modes are just scales. The fact that they are "modes" is not particularly important to their usage.

The way major is used in a tonal progression isn't any different than on a "modal" one. Its used to embellish a major chord, in a any context. The end.
#11
Well I just started learning music theory uh... yesterday so i'm kinda um not good at it. But I don't think context would change the sound of it. So it's the same thing?
#12
The way major is used in a tonal progression isn't any different than on a "modal" one. Its used to embellish a major chord, in a any context. The end.

I didn't say they were used differently, I said they had different names in different contexts, which they do.
#13
Quote by bagamush
Well I just started learning music theory uh... yesterday so i'm kinda um not good at it. But I don't think context would change the sound of it. So it's the same thing?


Yes, the Ionian mode (modal scale) exists today as the Major scale.

Now if you want to get into music history, one could draw distinctions between the common compositional practices of different time periods, but the scales themselves are identical in sound & function.

That being said, the modal system where you find Ionian has evolved into the Major/minor tonal system. There really is no reason to refer to the scale as Ionian, because the term "Major scale" covers that particular scale. Same concept with Aeolian VS natural minor. (you'll want to be aware of the names and their relationships though to get a complete understanding)

It's modal scales like dorian, phrygian, lydian, & mixolydian that offer unique colors. When people use modes.... that's generally what they're using.
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Last edited by GuitarMunky at Aug 9, 2009,