#1
I'm currently trying to learn Limelight by Rush, and I've noticed how hard it is to do some of the chords with the current grip I'm using with my thumb pretty much being behind the neck at all times. After watching Lifeson himself doing Limelight himself, it seems like I need to change my grip style to how they grip the guitar with my thumb sort of sticking out so I can mute or play the 6th string.


Is there a name to this style of grip? Or is it how all people learning to play guitar eventually switch to? Also how exactly do you do it? I've tried, but it seems like my playing quality falls dramatically when I do it. I'm almost 100% sure its simply because I'm not doing it correctly considering the fact that I can barely play anything when I try to do it. Can someone help me out here?
#2
its not a special kind of grip, is just efficient use of your thumb. dont try to play solely like that, just use your thumb for the 6th string if its a difficult stretch for your other fingers.
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#3
Actually, having your thumb behind the neck like you described (classical style) is a lot better for your technique. the baseball grip (thumb over the top) is worse most of the time, however it's useful in certain situations where you need it to fret the top string because your other fingers are all being used, like on this voicing of and Fmaj7

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1

but other than those certain cases try to keep try to keep your thumb under the neck, almost like you're pinching the neck
#5
Quote by The4thHorsemen
Actually, having your thumb behind the neck like you described (classical style) is a lot better for your technique. the baseball grip (thumb over the top) is worse most of the time, however it's useful in certain situations where you need it to fret the top string because your other fingers are all being used, like on this voicing of and Fmaj7

0
1
2
3
3
1

but other than those certain cases try to keep try to keep your thumb under the neck, almost like you're pinching the neck


Couldn't you also use this voiceing for Fmaj7 so you don't have to use thumb over neck?

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#6
Quote by srob7001
Couldn't you also use this voiceing for Fmaj7 so you don't have to use thumb over neck?

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putting the maj7 in the bass isn't going to sound very nice most of the time.
#7
Quote by timeconsumer09
putting the maj7 in the bass isn't going to sound very nice most of the time.


I mean tech its the same though right?

Or would you just call it a Fmaj as that is mostly what you are going to hear?
#8
Quote by srob7001
I mean tech its the same though right?

Or would you just call it a Fmaj as that is mostly what you are going to hear?


No, it's still an Fmaj7. It's just that isn't a very common voicing.
#10
Quote by chainsawguitar
Exactly, its not about what the name is, its the sound. With that voicing, you would more likely hear a Cmaj add11 add13/E....which isnt great lol


No... that voicing sounds like an Fmaj7. Just muddy in the low end because of the 7th in the bass. There's (realistically) no way you could make that chord function as C anything.
#11
Quote by timeconsumer09
No... that voicing sounds like an Fmaj7. Just muddy in the low end because of the 7th in the bass. There's (realistically) no way you could make that chord function as C anything.


lol I wasnt trying to make it function, just to describe the sound. My point was, I wouldnt hear it as an Fmaj7 because of the low end.
#12
So it would be a Fmaj7, but because the 7th is on the low note instead of the high note it would sound like a Fmaj with an odd low thrown in.....I'll have to strum that one when I get home with both voicings and see what they sound like.
#13
Quote by srob7001
So it would be a Fmaj7, but because the 7th is on the low note instead of the high note it would sound like a Fmaj with an odd low thrown in.....I'll have to strum that one when I get home with both voicings and see what they sound like.


It's not going to sound strikingly different from just an F chord, as this other fellow is suggesting. Honestly, it doesn't.
#14
what the hell are u guys talking about?
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#15
Quote by metal_shredder0
what the hell are u guys talking about?


They're talking about the different tonality you get by switching around the high E and low F in a Fmaj7.
#16
Wouldn't it still sound the same though?
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#17
Quote by metal_shredder0
Wouldn't it still sound the same though?


You'd think so, but by switching around the octaves you get a really different sound and it just doesn't sound as good as the original voicing.
#18
wow the thread got way off topic... for years I did the "baseball grip" and now my wrist is destroyed (that and i hung my guitar too low). When I was in college I took classical guitar for a while and my prof told me how terrible the baseball grip was for my wrist and explained how nice the classical grip is.

I still pull out the baseball grip from habit and and technique, but I highly suggest using the classical grip as much as you can (you're wrist will thank you down the road)
#20
alright, this got way off topic, but I'd like to clarify about the Fmaj7 thing.

with the open low E string it would be called F/E

if you wanted a way to play Fmaj7 without using your thumb you could just play

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but it would have a little different sound than the way I put. and the way I showed is rarely used, it was just the first example I could come up with to show where you would have to use your thumb.
#21
You could play it a few more different ways.

0--5
1--5
2--2
3--x
0--3
1--1
^Note: Probably sarcastic
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#22
Ok two things.

One: I really didnt expect there to be so much debate about the way I described a chord lol I just meant to point out that the chord was weird and you wouldnt use it.

For everyone else: the E and C in the bass sound like a C major in first inversion to me, probably because I listen to alot of classical music. The strength of the major inverted major third is the dominant sound I hear in that chord and the rest of the notes seem to float on top. I dont think it could function as anything with the 7th in the bass- and I would never use a chord with a 7th in the bass!

Second: I'm a huge fan of the "classical" grip, and it fits in with my entire technique for the instrument. See my website for more about that.

The "baseball" grip is only good for note bends and wide vibrato really...
#23
The thread was really answered with the first reply
Quote by chainsawguitar
I dont think it could function as anything with the 7th in the bass- and I would never use a chord with a 7th in the bass!

3rd inversions can give a great texture to melodies in the right context.
^Note: Probably sarcastic
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#24
Quote by Deep*Kick
The thread was really answered with the first reply

3rd inversions can give a great texture to melodies in the right context.


I'm going to have to take your word for it, I've never really found that context. I'm thinking its just taste really...