#1
Hello UG. I am seeking Chord Progression formulas (and information on what scales to build them from) to build chord progressions in these styles: Classical, Neo-classical, Baroque, Folk, Power/Epic Metal (Rhapsody of Fire-style), Metal, Iron Maiden

If you could provide me with these formulas, it would be great. Thanks in advance, people of UG
#2
If you are in the key of C, the chords which will directly fit the scale are C Dm Em F G Am Bdim.

as for picking out chord sequences for specific genres it's not so much the chord sequence that defines the genre of music as the melody phrasing and orchestration
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#3
Quote by doive
If you are in the key of C, the chords which will directly fit the scale are C Dm Em F G Am Bdim.

How did you find out what was minor and diminished? This is very important to me. Please, if you don't take the time to explain it, at least link me to the article where you've learnt it.


as for picking out chord sequences for specific genres it's not so much the chord sequence that defines the genre of music as the melody phrasing and orchestration

I know, but i like to play lead on top of chords, and my self-made chord progressions kind of suck, so i want to learn how to make better ones.

I know one formula as of now, which is I IV V.
Last edited by robinlint at Aug 10, 2009,
#4
Quote by robinlint
How did you find out what was minor and diminished? This is very important to me. Please, if you don't take the time to explain it, at least link me to the article where you've learnt it.
look up how to harmonise the major scale - I don't know any articles off hand but you can probably find it in the music theory FAQ sticky. If you can't find anything pm me and I'll do my best to explain it.
#5
Quote by zhilla
look up how to harmonise the major scale - I don't know any articles off hand but you can probably find it in the music theory FAQ sticky. If you can't find anything pm me and I'll do my best to explain it.

Ah, i've found it, thanks . Now, can anyone here provide me with some chord progression formulas, plus the scales to build them from if necessary, in my favourite styles? (Classical, Neo-classical, Baroque, Folk, Power/Epic Metal (Rhapsody of Fire-style), Metal, Iron Maiden)

Right now, I only know I IV V.
#6
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chord_progression

Also learn about cadences an make up your own progressions:
http://www.musictheory.net/lessons/html/id55_en.html

I heavily suggest you read the other lessons first though.
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#7
sorry i didn't go into much detail but there are many of these threads every day and you just end up frustratingly repeating yourself, especially as most people seem unwilling to actually look into the theory.

take your scale (c major for example) C D E F G A B C
the basic chords are constructed from a root, 3rd and fifth. so for C - you take the root C find the 3rd note along E and the 5th note along G.

Now look at the intervals (number of semitones between each gap)
a major third is the 4th semitone above the root, a minor 3rd is the 3rd semitone above the root. a perfect 5th is the 7th semitone above the 5th a diminshed 5th is the 6th semitone. So for root on A 3rd note up is C which is a minor 3rd, the 5th note up is E which is 7 semitones, a perfect 5th. So you have root, minor 3rd, perfect 5th = minor chord = Am. yuo can do the same for each root note to work out this pattern of chords.
The only 6 words that can make you a better guitarist:

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#8
Quote by doive
sorry i didn't go into much detail but there are many of these threads every day and you just end up frustratingly repeating yourself, especially as most people seem unwilling to actually look into the theory.

Well, i'm not unwilling to do that, as you've seen in my other thread (or have you never replied in my thread?). Do you mean, though, that i repeat the same questions too often on this forum, or that you guys who know a lot of theory have to repeat yourself every time and mostly people do nothing with it?


take your scale (c major for example) C D E F G A B C
the basic chords are constructed from a root, 3rd and fifth. so for C - you take the root C find the 3rd note along E and the 5th note along G.

I already knew that, however:


Now look at the intervals (number of semitones between each gap)
a major third is the 4th semitone above the root, a minor 3rd is the 3rd semitone above the root. a perfect 5th is the 7th semitone above the 5th a diminshed 5th is the 6th semitone. So for root on A 3rd note up is C which is a minor 3rd, the 5th note up is E which is 7 semitones, a perfect 5th. So you have root, minor 3rd, perfect 5th = minor chord = Am. yuo can do the same for each root note to work out this pattern of chords.

Your explanation makes sense. The ones i've read didn't make sense to me very much. So thank you for the explanation. Do you mean, though, that a perfect fifth is the 7th semitone above the ROOT, not the 5th? And a diminished 5th is 6 semitones above the root?

Thanks again for your help .
#11
Ah, now that i've learnt how to turn a major scale into a chart of chords that sound good in the scale, my chords progressions sound good. Thanks!

I'd really like to know, though, the theory behind chord progressions used in classical music, neoclassical music, and metal.
#12
Why dont you analyse some music then? Get tabs of chord charts for some of your favorite metal songs and such , determine what scale they are using , and then see what progressions are common.
#13
Quote by Kroaton
Why dont you analyse some music then? Get tabs of chord charts for some of your favorite metal songs and such , determine what scale they are using , and then see what progressions are common.

That's a great idea! Problem is, most of those songs contain scales i don't know, and the only method i know for finding out keys is to look at the first chord or the last chord.
#14
Quote by robinlint
Well, i'm not unwilling to do that, as you've seen in my other thread (or have you never replied in my thread?). Do you mean, though, that i repeat the same questions too often on this forum, or that you guys who know a lot of theory have to repeat yourself every time and mostly people do nothing with it?
I hadn't seen your other thread/didn't recognise the username. I wasn't aiming that at you specifically at all it's just there are always several threads a day asking "what scale to use" or "what chord progressions should i use for xxxxxx type music?". This is a more intelligent thread than most of those, when someone wants to actually learn rather than just find a shortcut to playing a certain type of music i'm more than willing to help.

Your explanation makes sense. The ones i've read didn't make sense to me very much. So thank you for the explanation. Do you mean, though, that a perfect fifth is the 7th semitone above the ROOT, not the 5th? And a diminished 5th is 6 semitones above the root?

Thanks again for your help .

yes I did mean a perfect 5th is the 7th semitone above the root - sorry for any confusion. To make totally clear - if your root is E then the 7th fret on the E string is the prefect 5th, the 6th fret would be a diminshed 5th.

the pattern for working out names goes like this

Major 2nd = 2 semitones above root
major 3rd = 4 semitones above root
Perfect 4th = 5 semitones above root
Perfect 5th = 7 semitones above root
Major 6th = 9 semitones above root
Major 7th = 11 semitones above root

to create minor/major/diminshed augmented you need to follow 2 different patterns one for major one for perfect notes:

2 semi lower...1 semi lower....original note....1 semi higher
Diminished......Minor.............. Major............... Augmented

1 semi lower...original note....1 semi higher
Diminished......Perfect.............Augmented

this means all notes can have multiple names which must be deicded by context E.G in E, playing the 3rd fret e-string (G) could be considered either a augmented 2nd or a minor 3rd. It will almost inevitably be a minor 3rd unless there is some good contextual reason for it not to be, those situations are very rare, but they do happen

NB: these patterns apply what ever key/mode you're in. A minor scale is defined by Root, major 2nd, minor 3rd, perfect 4th, perfect 5th, minor 6th, minor 7th, root for example.
The only 6 words that can make you a better guitarist:

Learn theory
Practice better
Practice more
Last edited by doive at Aug 10, 2009,
#15
Quote by doive
I hadn't seen your other thread/didn't recognise the username. I wasn't aiming that at you specifically at all it's just there are always several threads a day asking "what scale to use" or "what chord progressions should i use for xxxxxx type music?". This is a more intelligent thread than most of those, when someone wants to actually learn rather than just find a shortcut to playing a certain type of music i'm more than willing to help.


yes I did mean a perfect 5th is the 7th semitone above the root - sorry for any confusion. To make totally clear - if your root is E then the 7th fret on the E string is the prefect 5th, the 6th fret would be a diminshed 5th.

the pattern for working out names goes like this

Major 2nd = 2 semitones above root
major 3rd = 4 semitones above root
Perfect 4th = 5 semitones above root
Perfect 5th = 7 semitones above root
Major 6th = 9 semitones above root
Major 7th = 11 semitones above root

to create minor/major/diminshed augmented you need to follow 2 different patterns one for major one for perfect notes:

2 semi lower...1 semi lower....original note....1 semi higher
Diminished......Minor.............. Major............... Augmented

1 semi lower...original note....1 semi higher
Diminished......Perfect.............Augmented

this means all notes can have multiple names which must be deicded by context E.G in E, playing the 3rd fret e-string (G) could be considered either a augmented 2nd or a minor 3rd. It will almost inevitably be a minor 3rd unless there is some good contextual reason for it not to be, those situations are very rare, but they do happen

NB: these patterns apply what ever key/mode you're in. A minor scale is defined by Root, major 2nd, minor 3rd, perfect 4th, perfect 5th, minor 6th, minor 7th, root for example.

Thanks for this information, i will read and learn this tomorrow, but right now it's very late in the evening. I wonder, though, what gives specific genres their specific chord progressions? If it isn't chord progression formulas, is it then the scale it is built out of?

By the way, do you mind if I add you as a friend? I add the people who have helped me, so i have a reference of who here is knowledgable (what's the word?) on music and who is not. Also just to chat.
Last edited by robinlint at Aug 10, 2009,
#16
Quote by robinlint
Thanks for this information, i will read and learn this tomorrow, but right now it's very late in the evening. I wonder, though, what gives specific genres their specific chord progressions? If it isn't chord progression formulas, is it then the scale it is built out of?

It's more a feeling than a specific chord sequence or melody, which are why these questions are so hard to answer.

Take a I IV V progression, give it some crunchy distortion and strum it as hard rock power chords, chances are it'll sound like some hard rock song you know. maybe AC/DC or nickelback

Now take the same progression, turn off all that gain, slow it down a bit, play the chords a bit higher up the neck and play all of them as off-beat upstrokes. chances are it'll sound like a reggae/ska song you know, maybe bob marley or sublime.

Cover songs are a great example of how songs aren't really dependant on the melodies and chord sequences, rather the feel of the piece.

original : http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HQ1H8uYaico&feature=related
Cover : http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jb6W-h5j3jM&feature=fvw
The only 6 words that can make you a better guitarist:

Learn theory
Practice better
Practice more
Last edited by doive at Aug 10, 2009,
#17
Quote by doive
It's more a feeling than a specific chord sequence or melody, which are why these questions are so hard to answer.

Take a I IV V progression, give it some crunchy distortion and strum it as hard rock power chords, chances are it'll sound like some hard rock song you know. maybe AC/DC or nickelback

I haven't even tried that out yet. Thanks


Now take the same progression, turn off all that gain, slow it down a bit, play the chords a bit higher up the neck and play all of them as off-beat upstrokes. chances are it'll sound like a reggae/ska song you know, maybe bob marley or sublime.

I get your point. Steven Seagull has told me basically the same thing before, and i did notice it really helps. I had played a song, but i strummed harder at some parts, which i never dared because strumming hard usually makes the guitar sound awful, and sometimes i arpeggiated some chords. That did really help. But still, for example rhapsody of fire has really.. well, classical chord progressions, that seem to ascend, then descend a little, then ascend even higher, then descend a little, and then ascend, and so on. I really would like to learn the theory behind that. Does it have a name? And for example, when i see Yngwie Malmsteen playing something, i see him first on a high pitch, then lower, then a bit higher, then even lower, then a bit higher. In other words, they go the direction they choose but alternate between going backwards a bit and going in the direction even more, until they've arrived at that pitch.


Cover songs are a great example of how songs aren't really dependant on the melodies and chord sequences, rather the feel of the piece.

original : http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HQ1H8uYaico&feature=related
Cover : http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jb6W-h5j3jM&feature=fvw

I am really too tired right now to view this, this site is seriously addictive and i stay up really late because of this forum. I'm going to bed now, so i'll see you later

Thanks, again, for the information.
In case you want to view that other thread i talked about, It's called "Using the whole fretboard for writing music". Click the name, it is a link to the thread.
Last edited by robinlint at Aug 10, 2009,