#1
Hey UG,

Ok, so i kinda understand the concept of chord sequences. As i understand it you pick a key eg. C the chords in that key are then :

I=C
II=D
III=E
IV=F
V=G
VI=A
VII=B
VIII=Octave=C

I understand that some of them are minors and all that but im not sure how to work it all out. Can you please help me by explaining how to make chord sequences??

My next question is,if im trying to make a riff for a song in a certain should i use notes from the scale of the Key the Song is in. EG if the song is in C should i use a C scale to for a riff??

Thanks UG
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#2
for major scales: major minor minor major major diminished major


the notes of the riff will determine what key the song is in
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Tell me what nation on this earth, was not born of tragedy-Primordial
#3
So does that mean:

I= Major
II=Minor
III=Minor
IV=Major
V=Major
VI=Diminished
VII=Major
VIII=Major

????????????

What is it for the other scales
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#4
Learn to harmonise the scale by stacking thirds. That will teach you how to construct chords from a scale. I think you can probably find info on it in the music theory faq in mt, if not pm me and I'll have a go at explaining it.

For making riffs, the easiest way imo is to just use the notes of the scale that fits whichever key your song is in. I'd make a couple like that with single notes, then try a couple with power chords, then try making a riff from diads. By then you'll probably have the confidence to play around a bit more.
#5
well here is also another way to figure out the major/minor chord sequence pattern.

Play the C Chord figure the notes - C E G (all within the C Major Key)
Next chord D (D, F#, A) O O F# is not in the Key of C Major)
So try the minor Version of D (D F A) now those notes fit C Maj)

continue until u get the rest
#6
Quote by ChiliFan01
So does that mean:

I= Major
II=Minor
III=Minor
IV=Major
V=Major
VI=Diminished
VII=Major
VIII=Major

????????????

What is it for the other scales
Almost - for the major scale anyway. Its actually:
I= Major
ii=minor
iii=minor
IV=Major
V=Major
vi=minor
viio=diminished

VIII is the root again.
#7
Quote by ChiliFan01
So does that mean:

I= Major
II=Minor
III=Minor
IV=Major
V=Major
VI=Diminished
VII=Major
VIII=Major

????????????

What is it for the other scales


after VII you repeat it so VIII is minor.usually the when using the roman numeral notation for chords major chords are written as capitals and minor as lowercase so the major scale tonality is

I-ii-iii-IV-V-vii°-VII


EDIT: beaten to it
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#8
Well, for the chords.

Imagine, your playing in the key of C major. All the notes you're "allowed" to use are all notes in the C major scale, C-D-E-F-G-A-B.

Chords are made out of 3 notes usually, it can be more but triad chords are the most usual and easiest to explain in this particular case.

A chord is build of the root note, I, the fifth (dominant) and the third (which will determine wether the chord is minor or major). As you can understand, all the chords will have to exist out of the notes in the C major scale in order to fit.

Example, you start out with the root chord, that would be C-E-G (I-III-V)
Imagine you wanna make a progression with I-II-III-IV-V, so C-D-E-F-G.
Now we're gonna construct the chord for D.

The D scale is the following: D-E-F#-G-A-B-C#. A D major chord would be D-F#-A (I-III-V).
As you probably noticed, the F# doesn't fit in the C major scale, and since we're playing in the key of C, we will have to lower the F# to a F in order to fit the C major key.

Now the chord D-F-A is a D minor chord, because of the lowered third. I'm gonna assume you know how to make a major chord minor, because that's what we just did, we lowered the third. You also have to lower the seventh if you're using that in a chord but I will leave that out for now.

Now you have to do the same with all the other chords.

E major scale: E-F#-G#-A-B-C#-D#
F major scale: F-G-A-A#-C-D-E
G major scale: G-A-B-C-D-E-F#

According to the explanation I did earlier, the chords would be E minor (E-G-B), F major (F-A-C), and G major (G-B-D).

I hope I cleared stuff up a little on that.

Now for your other question.

You should use all notes that somehow fit the key you're playing. You can use different modes of the C major key though, and you can use dissonants and chromatics etcetera. I suggest you check out 'http://thephraseoftheday.com/theory' for further information on the subject... I have too little time to explain it right now. >_<

That site was made by a UG user btw, I forgot his name though :p
Last edited by KoenDercksen at Aug 10, 2009,
#9
Quote by zhilla
Almost - for the major scale anyway. Its actually:
I= Major
ii=minor
iii=minor
IV=Major
V=Major
vi=minor
viio=diminished

VIII is the root again.


Ok so once you no how to figure the chords in a certain key,what order should i play them in ???

I no these are simple questions,but i had a crap music teacher so he skiped the theory part
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#14
Quote by KoenDercksen
By the way tell me if you did actually understand it too, that will make me feel good lol

Yeah i kinda get it, so what patterns do i use to make a progression like I.III,V?
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#16
Quote by KoenDercksen
C major, E minor, G major.

In the key of C.

Yeah but what other patterns are there?
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Fender Straocaster or Gibson Les Paul Slash Special -->Lovepedal Amp 50 --> Boss DD-3 --> Crybaby(soon to be Wh10 reissue) --> Big Muff PI --> Boss DS-2 --> Marshall JCM 900
#18
Quote by ChiliFan01
Ok so once you no how to figure the chords in a certain key,what order should i play them in ???

I no these are simple questions,but i had a crap music teacher so he skiped the theory part
Play them in whatever order you like, but if you want to be able to use the major scale over the top easily you want the chord progression to 'resolve' to the root chord of that scale, which means it feels finished if you end on that chord.
#19
Quote by Eggmond
after VII you repeat it so VIII is minor.usually the when using the roman numeral notation for chords major chords are written as capitals and minor as lowercase so the major scale tonality is

I-ii-iii-IV-V-vii°-VII


EDIT: beaten to it

wait what? both of your posts are off. i think you're mixing up the major and minor keys

For Ionian (major)
Half step (fret) 0    2   4     5    7    9    11   12
Scale degree     1    2   3     4    5    6    7    8/1
Triad quality    M    m    m    M    M    m    dim   M
Written          I   ii   iii   IV   V    vi    vii° I
In C major       CM   Dm   Em   FM   GM   Am  bdim  CM


Aeolian (minor) (making the VI chord of Ionian the I chord)
half step (fret)  0    2      3    5   7    8    10   12
Scale degree      1    2     b3    4   5   b6    b7   8/1
Triad             m    dim    M    m   m    M     M   m
Written           i    ii°   III  iv   v   VI   VII   i
In A minor       Am   bdim   CM   Dm   Em   FM   GM   Am


There's a lot more information but
Most songs/riffs are written with these basic tonalities. some of them use other modes, and it is common when using the minor mode to make the V chord major instead of minor, because it sounds better leading back to i. As in, instead of playing e minor and aminor, play e major and a minor
Last edited by eddievanzant at Aug 10, 2009,