#1
At the moment, I've got a few concepts on an intellectual level, but not as far as implementing them. I've been doing ear training recently, but I'm not sure how to fit that into writing music.

I want to write music for a band, I'm really into a lot of the 80's hair metal stuff, I'd like to know how to get a working knowledge as opposed to an intellectual understanding of music theory

Cheers,
Fraser
#2
Well you might want to go over ALL of the basics in music theory: scales, chords, and their progressions.

Once you understand the workings of progressions, you can easily write a song in a specific key and scale. A suggestion for inspiration to what key you may want to choose, pick up your instrument and come up with a riff/progression that sounds appealing to your ears, and then figure out what you have played. From that, you can build upon the song's different parts.

If you're into more technical/complex music (Definitely some Neoclassical Metal, most of Fusion, and ofcourse Jazz), they key of the song may change multiple times. In that case, you will have to go slightly deeper into theory to see which keys are most compatible with each other.

With 80's Metal in general, a lot of the music was made of riffs that didn't necessarily stick to a key and scale, but rather incorporated chromatics as well. In this case, you'll just want to mess around on your guitar until you find a cool riff, and then start deriving off of that.
#3
Quote by Fraserwatt
At the moment, I've got a few concepts on an intellectual level, but not as far as implementing them. I've been doing ear training recently, but I'm not sure how to fit that into writing music.

I want to write music for a band, I'm really into a lot of the 80's hair metal stuff, I'd like to know how to get a working knowledge as opposed to an intellectual understanding of music theory

Cheers,
Fraser


You have to experience the concepts you are studying in the proper context ......in music.

Listen to, and learn how to play songs.... analyze those songs. Make the connection between the theory, and what the theory is describing.....(the actual music)

Do this often over a period of time (years, not days)

be patient & enjoy the process of learning & making music.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Aug 10, 2009,
#4
I think the answer to your question is quite obvious. If by an "intellectual understanding of music theory" you mean that you know your theory, all you need to do now is put it into practice. Write some music, jam around with some songs you already know inside out. You can have a textbook knowledge of theory, but it'll be of no use until you actually know how to use it well. And the only way to learn how to do something well is to practice it.