#1
I recently have been learning some metal songs, and i realized that in many of the ones i've been looking at, they resolve phrases to a Major Third while they were playing in a minor key. I was wondering what this is called and why does it work/in what situation would one use this?
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#2
its actually called the same resolving in the major 3rd and it is used alot in 12 bar blues where they use 7th chords
#3
are you talking about E7 to Am in the key of A minor? (V7-i)

if so, the major third of the E is the raised 7th of A minor, making it the harmonic minor.

it just gives a stronger resolution to the Am.


Edit: what guy below me said is more than likely correct.
Last edited by MapOfYourHead at Aug 10, 2009,
#6
I don't think I've ever heard a picardy third in metal. TS, please give us an example of what you mean.
Last edited by bangoodcharlote at Aug 10, 2009,
#7
Quote by Declan87
sounds like you mean a picardy third ^ can you give an example?


that was my impression as well, based on the OP.
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#8
Do you mean they are resolving WITH a major third, or TO a major third? Because theres a huge difference.

Im gonna go out on a limb though and say its almost definitely not a picardy third. Picardy thirds are pretty much exclusive to classical music.
#9
It sound like he means its resolving to the III chord. As in, the progression implies minor, but then resolves to the III. like so (purely an example):

i VII V i iv VII III

Where the last two chords could be seen as a V - I resolution.
Last edited by timeconsumer09 at Aug 11, 2009,
#10
Quote by timeconsumer09
It sound like he means its resolving to the III chord. As in, the progression implies minor, but then resolves to the III. like so (purely an example):

i VII V i iv VII III

Where the last two chords could be seen as a V - I resolution.


This makes much more sense to me. Especially since in a picardy third, the i becomes a I. You cant just end the song on any major chord to make it a picardy third. You have to change the minor tonic to a major tonic
#11
Quote by timeconsumer09
It sound like he means its resolving to the III chord. As in, the progression implies minor, but then resolves to the III. like so (purely an example):

i VII V i iv VII III

Where the last two chords could be seen as a V - I resolution.
Yeah this is my impression as well.

I don't see, though, why it isn't just a major key if it resolves to the relative major. I thought the resolution was definitive of the key. Or, is TS talking about songs ending unresolved on the III somehow?
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#12
Quote by food1010
Yeah this is my impression as well.

I don't see, though, why it isn't just a major key if it resolves to the relative major. I thought the resolution was definitive of the key. Or, is TS talking about songs ending unresolved on the III somehow?


Well, the song is still in a minor key because the entire chord progression before the last two chords imply minor. You could think of those last two chords as a modulation in my example (so instead of VII - III, you could just call it a V - I which is a perfect cadence, which is why it sounds complete).
#13
TS;

List a song + timestamp where it happens.

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