#1
When I try to play something like this :

--4---
--4---
--4---
--6---
--6---
--4---


The G string never rings out unless I apply an astronomical pressure. Even then, it buzzes slightly. It's the only string that doesn't ring out properly.

However I can do an F chord and the likes just fine.

I think I may a problem with the shape of my finger. It's somewhat crooked.

Thanks in advance.
#2
make sure your finger is totally flat to the string, it'll come with practice barre chords are just a bit harder because of the extra finger pressure needed.

is your guitar properly set up?
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#3
I have the same problem, I cannot play a barre chord to save my life. no matter how much i try, i cannot get it done, B major is my enemy and i cannot play it to save my life. i have only been playing for 4 months now but i still cannot do a single barre chord.
#4
A few things, your going to have to press down astronomically hard for about a week or so, thats what I did, and eventually, what seemed to be astronomically hard came easily.

Also, take note of the little indentations on your fingers, you know, where the joints are?
Try moving your finger up or down so that those lines don't get pushed on any strings.
#5
OK so my new question is this. how do i bar 3 strings with out muting a 4th for example. my A major.

--2--
--x--
--0--
--3--
--3--
--3--
--0--

i try my hardest to play this cord but i always end up muting the high e. I could play the A as if i was playing a 6 string but i want to learn the chords for my 7 string.
#6
ive been playin for 2 years and i still have that problem. its all about practice and keeping your finger straight.
#7
Quote by dcline007
OK so my new question is this. how do i bar 3 strings with out muting a 4th for example. my A major.

--2--
--x--
--0--
--3--
--3--
--3--
--0--

i try my hardest to play this cord but i always end up muting the high e. I could play the A as if i was playing a 6 string but i want to learn the chords for my 7 string.


dont bar, play the notes on 3 with your middle ring and pinky and hit the 2 on the high e with your index

Are you telling me theyre out of dragons?
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#8
left hand posture...
Originally Posted by Twist of fate
I thought the "clean" button was to clean out the inside of the amp automatically, so I never pressed it.


Originally Posted by DjBrandenburg
pedals are stupid
#9
Try barring the strings with just your index finger, like it was a capo and get used to the feeling. Then try adding other fingers once your index is comfortable.
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#10
Okay, so it's vaguely on topic, but...

For a bit of hand strengthening and easy barre chard rhythm practice, try learning the rhythm part of the verse of Pink Floyd's The Wall. It's basically thirteen and a bit bars of D minor (i.e. the A minor shape, root on the 5th fret of the A string), so once you've, got your fretting hand set you can strum away until either your fretting hand runs out of puff or you run out of verse. It's quite a good one for getting the index finger used to making barres as the other fingers don't have to anything especially awkward in that particular shape. There's a very good Guitar Pro tab of it on UG somewhere - version 5.

For extra double fun, try the whole rhythm part, as it's just barre chords all the way, with a sort-of-hammered-on barre at a couple of points (that I still can't flippin' well make work).
Oh, now I've gone and spilled my tea. This really won't do at all.
#12
Also helpful is to try and let the weight of your arm generate most of the pressure. Otherwise, your thumb will get tired pretty quick. I say weight, but there's a bit of gently pulling back with your arm, I suppose, but think of it as letting gravity help you out. Once you get the hang of it, it makes it so much easier on your poor thumb.

Most of the time, as well, there's a part of the chord where you're holding the notes with other fingers than the one doing the barre. You don't need to apply pressure with the barre for those notes. For example:

--1--
--3--
--3--
--3--
--1--
-----

Pretty standard A form barre. The only strings that need the barre are the E and A string notes. You can get the A string note with the tip of the finger (not exactly the tip, but right near it), and let the lower part of your finger get the E string note, without needing to barre all the notes. The E form barre also has three notes that don't need barring. Keeping that in mind, you can usually find a way to give some slack to your index finger doing the barre.

Those are the two biggest factors that went into making barres easy for me. I can play them all night and not get tired. Developing the right muscles was a factor, but not as much as one might think.

Hope that helps a bit.
Last edited by Grep at Aug 13, 2009,
#13
Quote by Grep
Also helpful is to try and let the weight of your arm generate most of the pressure. Otherwise, your thumb will get tired pretty quick. I say weight, but there's a bit of gently pulling back with your arm, I suppose, but think of it as letting gravity help you out. Once you get the hang of it, it makes it so much easier on your poor thumb.

Interesting.

Are you saying that, in essence, you're hanging some of the weight of your fretting hand on the strap, and so pulling down on the neck slightly via the index* finger? I only ask because my fretting hand arm applies pressure up and towards me, and I get the feeling I'm missing a trick here.

* Assuming we're talking about barre chords where the index finger barres the lowest fret here, as opposed to, say, 9th chords.
Oh, now I've gone and spilled my tea. This really won't do at all.
#14
Quote by CarpUK
Are you saying that, in essence, you're hanging some of the weight of your fretting hand on the strap, and so pulling down on the neck slightly via the index* finger? I only ask because my fretting hand arm applies pressure up and towards me, and I get the feeling I'm missing a trick here.

* Assuming we're talking about barre chords where the index finger barres the lowest fret here, as opposed to, say, 9th chords.


Yep, index finger barres. Though, frankly, most of the pressure I apply comes from the same place, and not the thumb, so you can generalize it a bit past just barres, I think.

Don't know if I'd say you're pulling down as much as back. Since your arm is hanging behind the neck, a lot of the pressure ends up being backwards against the fretboard. It's sort of hard to describe, I guess... lol

I think it's less pulling against the strap and more pulling the neck back a bit, balanced out by my other arm against the body of the guitar. Without the arm there, it would actually move the neck back, which is obviously bad.

Of course, there's a bit of thumb involved too, but I can still make good barres and take my thumb completely away from the back of the neck. I wouldn't actually do that when playing, but it does sort of demonstrate what I mean (I hope!).

Basically, add a bit of arm pulling back (mostly from just letting the elbow hang) to the thumb pressure, but don't tense it up. It feels like letting the arm hang at the elbow, generating a bit of pressure pulling back.

Terribly sorry if I'm not being clear, but it's really hard to explain.
#15
Yeah, you should be able to hold the chord with no thumb. If you need the thumb then you are relying on it too much and your hand will get tired, especially on an acoustic.