#1
so i was learning how to make chord progressions and i know how to do it and know i have a question
if i create a chord progression in B lets say B,D#m,E,F#m,and B again.
so if i want to make a solo or a riff for the song i can just use the b major scale or the petonic right am i correct and thanks for your help


-manuel
#4
Pentatonic major is the same as major scale with just a couple of notes taken out. So whatever fits in pent major fits in the normal major scale.
#5
You can use B major, B MAJOR pentatonic, or G# pentatonic minor. You can't use B pentatonic minor with a B major progression.
#6
your talking about major pentatonic right
or the minor pentatonic scale

EDIT NVM saw the post right above cleared things up thanks guys
#7
Quote by FaisalTMusic
You can use B major, B MAJOR pentatonic, or G# pentatonic minor. You can't use B pentatonic minor with a B major progression.
Many guitarists think this, but it is wrong. Over a B major progression, you HAVE to play B something. You cannot play G# minor, C# Dorian, et cetera. However, that "something" can be any B scale. The reality is that, in rock, it is very common to use the parallel minor pentatonic over a major progression (ex. Cm pentatonic over C major progression).


This is purely an issue of nomenclature, but it's important to know.
#8
Quote by bangoodcharlote
Many guitarists think this, but it is wrong. Over a B major progression, you HAVE to play B something. You cannot play G# minor, C# Dorian, et cetera. However, that "something" can be any B scale. The reality is that, in rock, it is very common to use the parallel minor pentatonic over a major progression (ex. Cm pentatonic over C major progression).


This is purely an issue of nomenclature, but it's important to know.

I agree, definitely something important to point out.
#9
Quote by bangoodcharlote
Many guitarists think this, but it is wrong. Over a B major progression, you HAVE to play B something. You cannot play G# minor, C# Dorian, et cetera. However, that "something" can be any B scale. The reality is that, in rock, it is very common to use the parallel minor pentatonic over a major progression (ex. Cm pentatonic over C major progression).


This is purely an issue of nomenclature, but it's important to know.


The B minor pentatonic would have scales outside the B major scale though. You can call it a pentatonic derivation of B Aeolian, which would result in G# minor pentatonic, or B Aeolian pentatonic.

If you play a B major progression and solo over with a B minor pentatonic scale, it gives a completely different feel. Not necessarily bad, but unexpected. However if you played the B major pentatonic over the B major progression, you can easily switch back and forth between major and relative minor, because all of the intended notes would be contained in the scale. However, the different degrees in the progression may yield a similar effect (as you suggested), where you would be playing a different degree of the B major progression, yet play in the B major pentatonic scale.

If I am wrong, I certainly hope it isn't theory-wise (as you said, perhaps nomenclature). It's how I've been improvising and soloing over progressions for some time now. Trying to play B major and B minor pentatonic sounds... odd and dissonant when you hit the 5rd degree of the pentatonic scale, since (Take B major for example) the 7th (final) degree of the B major scale would be Bb, and in the pentatonic, the 5th (final) degree of the B major pentatonic scale would be A.

Please do correct me if I am wrong.
#10
Quote by FaisalTMusic
if you played the B major pentatonic over the B major progression, you can easily switch back and forth between major and relative minor, because all of the intended notes would be contained in the scale.

It's just a nomenclature thing
#11
In the key of B you could use B major pentatonics G# Minor Pentatonics and also B minor pentatonics. Aerosmith for example does that for a few songs just as an example. You could also use ur B Major modes in both the parelllel and deriative approach, for the parrellel approach u cud use the B major modes and for the deriative you cud use either the B ionian B dorian B phrygian B Lydian B mixolydian B aeolian or B Locriain but this depends on the chord progression
#12
Concerning the use of B minor: The use of the parallel minor pentatonic is very common in progressions using dominant chords (I7 - IV7 - V7), and all chromatic tones added by the minor scale can be expressed as alterations to a dominant chord...

b3 = #9
b6 = #5
b7 = Contained in a dominant chord

The use of the minor pentatonic really suggests an altered dominant chord rather than a minor scale, but "minor pentatonic" is easier to say than "Hey man! Suggest some alterations to that dominant chord by playing tones derived from the parallel minor!". Altered dominants have a very unique dissonance to them that is very popular in blues.
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