#1
I was hoping if there was any smooth transition to change from a Major key to the relative minor key. What I mean would be like change C to Am, or A to F#m.

Thanks!
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#2
well, a relative minor IS its major key, just more emphasis on the 6th scale tone. thats all there is to it.
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#4
Quote by TK1
well, a relative minor IS its major key, just more emphasis on the 6th scale tone. thats all there is to it.


No I know that, but lets say I'd like to change the feel of the song from Major to Minor. Is there anyway to transition into the Minor key or is it always going to sound so sudden?
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#5
It doesn't sound sudden if you're using minor chords already in the major key.

If you want to emphasise the minor feel, like if you wanted to have a minor sounding verse and a major chorus, write a melody with a minor feel to it over the minor verse, a major melody over the major chorus.

However if you plan on modulating to a different minor key, for example A major to A minor, that's a little different.
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#6
Quote by TK1
well, a relative minor IS its major key, just more emphasis on the 6th scale tone. thats all there is to it.


This is wrong. They are relative in that they have the same notes, but they are NOT the same by any means, nor is the relative minor just "more emphasis on the 6th scale tone". That really isn't all there is to it. If you see a progression like...

C - F - G - C - F - G - Dm - Am - Dm - Em - C - E - Am

How would you label it with roman numerals? Even with these 13 chords, it seems like we've modulated from a major to a minor. The I IV V vamp in the beginning solidifies the major, then it's just more of the same (basically) but when you get to the first Am, you can see the tonality starting to shift until it finally resolves with the V - i at the end.

It would sound a lot better if it were a longer progression, maybe with some repeated sections. But you get the idea.
Last edited by timeconsumer09 at Aug 11, 2009,
#7
The tonality in that progression doesn't really shift, it looks more like you are just using a V/vi rather then modulating, since you decided to use G-C right before the E and am.
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#9
Maybe get ideas from songs that do that?
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#10
If you want to feel the change then you can't change from a major scale into the minor scale that contains the same notes.

Try this:

Fmaj7 - C7 - Bbmin7 - C7

Bbmin7 - Ebmin7 - Abmaj7 - Fmin7