#1
Whats the best way to identify a good scale to solo over a specific key?

And another question along those lines, whats a good way to generate a good chord progression over a certain key?

I'm still slowly learning, I just barely got the whole key thing so now I'm trying to move onto more advanced ideas.

And is there any good way to identify the key of a song? (apart from generally listening to the 1st chord?)
#2
Look at all the chords. Which scale use all these tones?

For example, if you got
|F#|D|A|E| , then its most likely E
Quote by CoreysMonster
Why, my pasty danish cracker, I believe you've got it!
#3
Quote by harelo
Whats the best way to identify a good scale to solo over a specific key? usually the easiest way to play in key is to stick with the key. e.g. If you are playing over a progression in the key of A, then solo using A major

And another question along those lines, whats a good way to generate a good chord progression over a certain key? over a certain key? I think you may be getting confused here. Anyway, there are lots of chord progressons that you can utilise. A really simple, very often used, chord progression is I IV V

I'm still slowly learning, I just barely got the whole key thing so now I'm trying to move onto more advanced ideas.

And is there any good way to identify the key of a song? (apart from generally listening to the 1st chord?) listen to the chord progression to hear which chord the progression resolves to.


Can you explain to us what a key is?
#4
id say a "key" is the note corresponding to the tonal center of the piece of music you are listening to, that is, the note that resolves the melody

for example, if you play the famous "smoke on the water" riff like this:

E: 0-3-5 ... 0-3-6-5 ... 0-3-5-3-0

the note that resolves the melody, the note that gives you the sensation that the music is "complete" is "0", that is E.

so you can say that riff is in the key of E.
#5
Quote by Gacel
id say a "key" is the note corresponding to the tonal center of the piece of music you are listening to, that is, the note that resolves the melody

for example, if you play the famous "smoke on the water" riff like this:

E: 0-3-5 ... 0-3-6-5 ... 0-3-5-3-0

the note that resolves the melody, the note that gives you the sensation that the music is "complete" is "0", that is E.

so you can say that riff is in the key of E.


That's fine, but kinda gives TS an answer, thus defeating the reason for my question!
#6
Well I mean the guy definetly put it into better words that I could :P

But my problem with the solos is figuring out which scale goes well in what key.

Say the key is E, what determines weather I use a major (intervals 1,2,3,4,5,6,7) or a pentatonic major (1,2,3,5,6)?

And when it comes to chord progression, what determines what modification of the chord I use in that key?

eg. In the key of A, and I'm using I-IV-V, really simple, can I play any variations of these?
so instead of playing A D E, can I play A Dmaj7 Em6?
#7
I don't mean any disrespect in my answer, but use whatever sounds good to you. Try a few different things and see what works and what doesn't. If you have an idea in your head of what the solo should sound like, try to match the tones on your guitar. That's really the best way.
#8
Quote by harelo
Well I mean the guy definetly put it into better words that I could :P

But my problem with the solos is figuring out which scale goes well in what key.

Say the key is E, what determines weather I use a major (intervals 1,2,3,4,5,6,7) or a pentatonic major (1,2,3,5,6)?

And when it comes to chord progression, what determines what modification of the chord I use in that key?

eg. In the key of A, and I'm using I-IV-V, really simple, can I play any variations of these?
so instead of playing A D E, can I play A Dmaj7 Em6?
The major pentatonic is just the major scale with the 4th and 7th omitted - so you can use the major pentatonic over anything the major scale will work over (the same doesn't necessarily work in reverse though - you can't always use the major scale over a chord progression the major pent will work over).

Same applies to the minor scale and the minor pentatonic - the minor pent is the minor scale with the 2nd and 6th removed, so you can use it over anything you can use the minor scale over.

If you are in A Major and using I-IV-V you can use any variations of them - if you want to be able to use the major scale over it without any complications then keep it diatonic (only use notes from the scale in the chords).

If you're more confident you can use other variations, and play on the out-of-scale chord tones for the duration of the chord.