#1
I'm not completely sure if this is meant to be here. Please move it if it needs.

In Aus you get a Certificate once you finish highschool. In Victoria it's called VCE. You have to do a total of at least 16 units (kind of like sections of a subject) to complete your VCE. If you do more, the top10 units are counted toward your final ATAR (used to be called ENTER) score. Also, most people do more than 16 units.

I'm in year 10 - about to fully start VCE - and am scared ****less of what I'm going to do for VCE in the next 2 years.

so far I have

YEAR 10
Music Performance (2 units)
General Math (2 units)

YEAR 11
Music Performance Group (2 units)
Further Math (2 units)
English (2 units)
English Literature (2 units)

Year 12
Music Performance Solo (2 units)
English (2 units)
English Literature (2 units)

I was thinking about also doing IT (which would put 2 units in year 11 and 2 in year 12) or Music Industry - Technical Production (which would also put 2 units in year 11 and 2 in year 12).

If anyone has done VCE or kind of gets what I'm talking about. What do you think? So far what I have will get me into whatever courses I want, it's just is it enough?


tl;dr I need help selecting my VCE subjects.
Last edited by mdwallin at Aug 11, 2009,
#2
Well it depends what type of musician. If you want to be a teacher than you don't probably need to know an awful lot about technical production. If you plan on being a studio hand though, you probably do. I would recommend however that IT is the most important life skill on that list - it will open up more avenues than you can even imagine at this stage in life.
The only 6 words that can make you a better guitarist:

Learn theory
Practice better
Practice more
#3
Wow... I wish I was this forward thinking when I was your age. Those options seem cool however, don't go overboard with narrowing down your options just yet. Get a broad range of subjects under your belt. Who knows, in a few years you could be wishing you had chosen a different route.

One piece of advice though. Once you get to university/college be sure to join as many music related societies as possible. This is more valuable than anything school can give you.

Good Luck =)
#5
Quote by d3adh3adch3mist
Wow... I wish I was this forward thinking when I was your age.
One piece of advice though. Once you get to university/college be sure to join as many music related societies as possible. This is more valuable than anything school can give you.

Good Luck =)

thank my teachers

I won't be able to get into the uni courses if I don't do these subjects now.. But yeah, I will (and have been) get into all the music groups and clubs
Quote by doive
Well it depends what type of musician. If you want to be a teacher than you don't probably need to know an awful lot about technical production. If you plan on being a studio hand though, you probably do. I would recommend however that IT is the most important life skill on that list - it will open up more avenues than you can even imagine at this stage in life.

I would like to do either performance, composition or teaching.
I would do IT, but the description of talked more about just learning how to use all the microsoft programs to the full extent. I'm more interested in the coding side of it.
Quote by IvanGroznij
It wasn't very clear in your post what it is you want to do with music as a career, but you might want to read these articles if you want to do music full time: http://tomhess.net/MusicCareerArticles.aspx

thanks that's an awesome link.
Last edited by mdwallin at Aug 11, 2009,
#6
One question: do you really need to go to college?

Because all the things that matters you'll learn experimenting, with people more experienced than you. If I were you, I'd learn any skill by working with professionals and I'm sure it will be much more rewarding than college.
#7
Quote by symba05
One question: do you really need to go to college?

Because all the things that matters you'll learn experimenting, with people more experienced than you. If I were you, I'd learn any skill by working with professionals and I'm sure it will be much more rewarding than college.

The college I am hoping to get into does exactly that. About a quarter of the time is spent in the classroom, half is working with your teachers one-on-one and then the rest is up to you.

Also a lot of 'professionals' won't take you on unless you have the qualifications like everyone else.

why limit yourself to just one option, when you can do both
#8
I live in SA and in yr 12 atm, gonna go to UNI of SA and apply for a bachelor Music at the end of the yead, should be good.
#10
I wasn't aware UniSA offered a Bachelors degree in music. Is it only recent?
Not a huge fan of bees