#1
My Epiphone Les Paul has pretty bad sustain, what can I do to increase it besides swapping the pickups? I taped Gibson to the headstock already and it didn't do anything, so please don't suggest that.
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#2
You obviously didn't tape it right. Did you also make sure the headstock looked like a Gibson headstock.
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#3
Not much without a pup change. Those pups are weak, but you could try adjusting the height of them.

Some amp settings, more gain, some delay, reverb. Standing close to the amp for holding notes etc.
Last edited by Tempoe at Aug 11, 2009,
#4
Yeah, tape it properly.

Seriously though, you can try raising your action or buy a sustainer/compression pedal, boss cs-3 for instance.
#6
Change the tailpiece and tune-o-matic. The nut also plays a role in sustain.


That, or you just have bad wood resonance.

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#7
90% of the time a lack of sustain on a decent guitar is a setup issue. Pickups are rarely so bad that they destroy sustain. I'd take it to a tech and get a good setup done- nut, fret dress, bridge, action, intonation, etc. Make sure the old parts are working properly before you decide you need to start buying new ones.
#8
Quote by DotSick
Change the tailpiece and tune-o-matic. The nut also plays a role in sustain.


That, or you just have bad wood resonance.

this is the first decent reply to this thread:

changing pickups does not increase sustain. the only way it can physically increase the sustain is if you get two pickups with weaker magnets. stronger magnets = more loss of sustain due to the magnetic pull. this is why you rarely see guitars with more than 3 pickups. using gibson pickups won't give you more sustain because it's gibson's wood that gives the guitars the sustain, not their pickups.

raising the action does slightly improve sustain, compression does not - you can't use compression to increase sustain without an unfortunately bad signal:noise ratio on the sustained notes - a compressor raises the signal level of quieter signals, noise and all.

^+1 to colin as well.
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#9
Quote by DotSick
Change the tailpiece and tune-o-matic. The nut also plays a role in sustain.


That, or you just have bad wood resonance.



+1 on Nut, Tailpiece, and TOM.
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#10
#1 route is a proper setup: neck, nut, frets & action-and since you are there, intonation.
#2 -if #1 is not enough- route should be the more expensive route: quality nut & bridge -I don't find this credible on a non-trem type bridge, but some aspects will affect sustain.
#3 scrap the guitar, buy a new one with the desired amount of sustain off-the-shelf.

As it was mentioned before, pickups might affect sustain to a lesser extent if they are too close to the strings & the mags are relatively strong. Easy to tell the difference when going from a very hot pickup to a mild, vintage style one -especially when you play with their height.

Acoustic resonance is the ultimate tell-tale: unplug it, strum a chord and let it ring. Count seconds. Do #1, and run the same test. Do the same throughout the neck.
#11
Doing a tone pros set up on my 2 epis made a big difference in their tone and sustain. I didnt go buy the tone pros parts. I drilled and tapped some holes for set screws which locks the bridge and tailpiece up much tighter. The plastic nut on epis leaves much to be desired. And yes a proper set up will do wonders, most of the epis Ive seen in stores have pretty high action to compensate for the fret work.

Another big contributor to sustain is technique.
#12
Is it normal that notes higher up on the fretboard have less sustain?
Breaking stereotypes by playing indie on a metal guitar.

Current Gear
- Epiphone Les Paul Standard (Plus Top)
- Crappy Strat Copy (Redecorated, looks snazzy)
- Ibanez Acoustic/Electric Guitar
- Ibanez RG1570 Mirage Blue
- Peavey Vypyr 30 Watt
#13
Why the **** would you change the ToM and stopbar on these guitars? They come stock with LockTone bridges, there isn't another ToM/stopbar bridge on the market that can sustain better.

This is almost starting to piss me off. Epiphone's hardware is the one part of their guitars you never have to change.



OP, you want sustain? Raise your action, use the correct gauge strings for normal tension on your chosen tuning, lower your pickups, learn better vibrato control, maybe invest in a compressor pedal.
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#14
Quote by Guitar2theface
Is it normal that notes higher up on the fretboard have less sustain?


Yes. The shorter the distance between the two extremes, the higher the vibration frequency and the faster energy dissipates.
#15
This applies even more to bolt on neck guitars but make sure EVERY nut, bolt, and screw on the guitar is tight. Obviously neck mounting screws (if you have them). Tuning peg screws. The nut on top of the tuning pegs. Pickup ring screws. Volume knob nuts. Pickguard screws. Some people might argue it doesn't make a difference but the idea is to get everything on the guitar to vibrate as one, versus the sound of 100 different parts flopping around. It increases sustain and just plain will make any guitar sound better.
#16
Quote by MrFlibble
Why the **** would you change the ToM and stopbar on these guitars? They come stock with LockTone bridges, there isn't another ToM/stopbar bridge on the market that can sustain better.

This is almost starting to piss me off. Epiphone's hardware is the one part of their guitars you never have to change.



OP, you want sustain? Raise your action, use the correct gauge strings for normal tension on your chosen tuning, lower your pickups, learn better vibrato control, maybe invest in a compressor pedal.

Has it occurred to you that he might have an older model that didn't come with a LockTone? They've only started doing that in recent years.

For some (somewhat) interesting readings on this, try the link below.
http://www.epiphone.com/Doctor/locktone.html

WHAT HAVE YOU DONE
#17
I probably have a newer model (I bought it last year and it probably hasn't been sitting in the store too long) so that's probably not the problem.

I'm using .10s, tuned standard, on a Les Paul (22 frets). I don't know about the action, I liked the way it was set up in the store so I kept it like that.
Breaking stereotypes by playing indie on a metal guitar.

Current Gear
- Epiphone Les Paul Standard (Plus Top)
- Crappy Strat Copy (Redecorated, looks snazzy)
- Ibanez Acoustic/Electric Guitar
- Ibanez RG1570 Mirage Blue
- Peavey Vypyr 30 Watt