#1
I seem to have a problem where I cannot strum fast. I can tremolo pick fairly decently but if i have to strum 2+ strings back and forth really fast I can't do it. Times I've noticed this flaw were when I started to learn Anna Molly by Incubus, and there's also a part in the ending solo of Fade to Black where he's something like:

--10-10-10-x-x-x-10-10-10-x-x-x-
-----------x-x-x----------x-x-x-
---7--7--7-x-x-x--7--7--7-x-x-x-
--------------------------------
--------------------------------
--------------------------------


(not exactly right but you get the idea) and I usually just tremolo/mute the 10 on the high e which is kinda OK but not the real octave sound I want.

Any tips? Is it something to do with loosening my right hand?
#3
Quote by TunaFish
Maybe you could use Alt Picking there.


I don't think you read that right... I want to strum faster, the 7's & 10's in the tab I included are at the same time.
#4
Strumming U,D,U...etc would be alt picking technically.

You just gotta really keep a loose right hand. Or should I say wrist. Think loose and funky and that right hand will come around in no time.
#6
Quote by saw7988
I don't think you read that right... I want to strum faster, the 7's & 10's in the tab I included are at the same time.


Thats why alternative picking picking makes it faster.
#7
It's not alternate "picking" it's alternate "strumming" which pretty much all strumming is. But details detail details...

more importantly I think I just need to work on keeping my wrist loose. Is it possible that I need to strum lighter on the strings too? Also how can I work on this?
#8
Strum lightly until you get used to staying loose, then you can work on accenting certain parts to give it an actual feel.

Also easier with a thin pick until you get used to the loose feeling.
#9
Quote by srob7001
Strum lightly until you get used to staying loose, then you can work on accenting certain parts to give it an actual feel.

Also easier with a thin pick until you get used to the loose feeling.


Oooo the thin pick idea is interesting - I'm always using a 1.14 (I think) right now. The thickest dunlop, purple. Would it be good to practice with a thin pick or should I keep learning with my thick one since that's what I'll be using anyway..?
#10
Quote by saw7988
Oooo the thin pick idea is interesting - I'm always using a 1.14 (I think) right now. The thickest dunlop, purple. Would it be good to practice with a thin pick or should I keep learning with my thick one since that's what I'll be using anyway..?


I too always use thick picks but until you can get that loose feel in your wrist I would recomend using a thinner pick untill you get the proper wrist motion down.

If you don't have the proper technique and put too much of the pick into the strings you will break your strings fairly easy if you are using your thinck pick. If you must use the thick one just be vary aware at all times of how much of the tip of that pick you are using.
#11
Use only a tiny little bit of the pick and be loose. Also, strum and pick lightly. You don't need to attack the notes, per say. Rather, play lightly and let the amp do its job (make you loud).