#1
There is this song that I like the solo of so I looked at the tab but part of it is strange. It's in the key of C major and there is an F major arpegio to a D major arpegio to the note G. The D major is the part that doesn't fit because the 3rd is F# and that doesn't fit with the key so it's obviously chromatic from the F to the F# to the G as those are the notes the emphasis is put on. I think it sounds really good but I want to know how this would fit with a chord progression to incorporate it into my improvising as an idea because it sounds awesome.


e|---------------5------------5--------|
B|------------6-----7~~-----7----8~~----|
G|-10~~-----5-------------7-----------|
D|--------7~------------7~-------------|
A|-------------------------------------|
E|-------------------------------------|
#2
D is fifth of G... =] It goes out of key to create a sort of 'tension' and then come back to the original key, or change to G in this case.. a D7 should be better.
Last edited by Roscio at Aug 11, 2009,
#3
i'm not expert, but aren't there a number of places where you can just throw in chromatics and stray from the scale temporarily depending on the progression? these are "blue notes", no?

i've only briefly read about it. i don't know much about theory i usually just try it during practice and see how things turn out. *shrugs*
"... and on either side of the river was the tree of life, with its twelve kinds of fruit, yielding its fruit each month. The leaves of this tree were for the healing of nations.
#4
The song may not be in the key of C or there could have been a key change, but if it is, it looks as if he's just borrowing notes from the C blues major scale which also includes F# and D#

The best thing you can do when using chromatics is use you ear and find which accidental notes sound better then the others.

Use you ear
#5
Quote by konfyouzd
i'm not expert, but aren't there a number of places where you can just throw in chromatics and stray from the scale temporarily depending on the progression? these are "blue notes", no?

i've only briefly read about it. i don't know much about theory i usually just try it during practice and see how things turn out. *shrugs*

Oh yes.. In this case F# is also a blue note!
#6
the chromatic scale can be used in any key or progresion to add tensión and introduce notes, in no expert but i prefer to use with extended chords
s
#7
Call me af fool but chromatics and blue notes?

Isnt he just playing a secondary dominant (V/V) which is functional cause it proceeds to V?
#8
Quote by deHufter
Call me af fool but chromatics and blue notes?

Isnt he just playing a secondary dominant (V/V) which is functional cause it proceeds to V?


you've lost me...
"... and on either side of the river was the tree of life, with its twelve kinds of fruit, yielding its fruit each month. The leaves of this tree were for the healing of nations.
#9
and me :P But whenever I try to improvise in C major with this note it never works. I think there is a key change somehow or it might not be in C major but i'm 90% sure it is. Either way there is no way You can get a D major and F major in the same key.
#10
Quote by jdmarsh2005
and me :P But whenever I try to improvise in C major with this note it never works. I think there is a key change somehow or it might not be in C major but i'm 90% sure it is. Either way there is no way You can get a D major and F major in the same key.


all i can tell you is Eb will always sound ok. it's one of those notes you can toss in from Am pentatonic even though i don't think it actually exists in the Am pentatonic scale. it's one of those chromatics you can just use. there are a lot of them actually but i don't know what they are i just know the fingering patterns.

actually now that i'm forcing myself to figure out what they are in my head i think all the ones i know have already been mentioned...

i fail.
"... and on either side of the river was the tree of life, with its twelve kinds of fruit, yielding its fruit each month. The leaves of this tree were for the healing of nations.
#11
Quote by deHufter
Call me af fool but chromatics and blue notes?

Isnt he just playing a secondary dominant (V/V) which is functional cause it proceeds to V?

It could be analysed like this. A little cycle of fifths, with the D being the secondary dominant of G. However the resolution would've been stronger had the D been a dominant chord.
Quote by thsrayas
Why did women get multiple orgasms instead of men? I want a river of semen flowing out of my room to mark my territory.

You can play a shoestring if you're sincere
- John Coltrane
#12
Quote by jdmarsh2005
and me :P But whenever I try to improvise in C major with this note it never works. I think there is a key change somehow or it might not be in C major but i'm 90% sure it is. Either way there is no way You can get a D sharp (Eb) and F sharp in the same key.


it's possible. it's not the scale exactly... you're allowed to stray from time to time. there are no note police to make sure you're not swerving so you don't necessarily have to stay within any defined lines...
"... and on either side of the river was the tree of life, with its twelve kinds of fruit, yielding its fruit each month. The leaves of this tree were for the healing of nations.
#13
I know that I can use chromatics to stray it's just that it's not just a passing note, the D major arpegio is played which makes it sound more like the chord D major being used in the solo which is why I asked about it here.
#14
Quote by jdmarsh2005
I know that I can use chromatics to stray it's just that it's not just a passing note, the D major arpegio is played which makes it sound more like the chord D major being used in the solo which is why I asked about it here.


oh i don't know a whole lot about that kind of thing, but i get what you're saying. i don't really understand why certain arpeggios are played where but i'd imagine it has to do w/ the chord progression since an arpeggio is basically just a broken chord, no?
"... and on either side of the river was the tree of life, with its twelve kinds of fruit, yielding its fruit each month. The leaves of this tree were for the healing of nations.
#15
I think so yes. But the problem is I don't know the chord progression. The tab isn't very good.
#16
Yeah I'd assume that it's part of the chord progression.
This is an example of a "Secondary Dominant". It's best described as the "dominant's dominant". It uses the pull of V7-I to lead to the V.
Spelled II7-V7-I.

I'm surprised more people on here didn't know that, it's a fairly common convention.
Вяєҭҭ
ZeGuitarist's sister is hawt.
?)