#1
My dad recently talked to a man he knows who has a 1960s Les Paul. This man said he would be willing to sell my dad the guitar, but there is a catch. It seems as though he kept the guitar in a case in his attic for years and never touched it. When he looked at the guitar, the neck was bowing a lot and cracks were forming where the neck meets the body.

Now, this guy is talking about repairing the neck himself, replacing the fretboard (I think he said with a walnut(?) fretboard), and maybe using a wider neck.

I know this isn't necessarily much to go by (would be better if a picture was included), but there are some things I'm wondering about.

Don't Les Pauls have neck-through bodies? Would that make it more difficult to repair? How much would this take away from the value if the neck has gone to hell and been replaced? Won't the bridge have suffered some as well from the tension of the strings? How likely is it that the pick-ups are corroded and sound horrible?

I would like to have this guitar, but I would also like to have it working. Hearing how little he took care of it is rageworthy.

Help?
#2
It might have a bolt on
Edit: pics would probably help
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#4
Quote by kakos
les pauls have set necks . thats all i can help here


Anyone know how costly/difficult it would be to repair this then?
#5
Quote by ScarecrowWillie
Anyone know how costly/difficult it would be to repair this then?


Difficult, but not impossible.

You're going to get charged ALOT by a luthier to do it, however.
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#6
Unfortunately, the only proper way to go about this, if it is a real 60's vintage les paul, is to have a professional do all the work. It's going to be very fragile and very sensitive to being messed with.
The worst thing you could possibly do here is attempt an amateur fix; once you've done a hack job on an original instrument worth that much, there's no going back. I'd take it to a luthier and discuss your options from there. It won't be cheap, but it will be worth it, and the alternative is just tragic.
#7
If it is that messed up then the finished product wont be a 60s les paul, itll be a 60s/00s frankenstein

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They never had dragons..
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#9
Quote by glenthemann
If it is that messed up then the finished product wont be a 60s les paul, itll be a 60s/00s frankenstein



Love your sig man. DETHKLOK RULES!!! \m/
MY GEAR:
PRS SE Custom 24
Jackson DKA7
Gibson Explorer
MESA/Boogie Express 5:25
BOSS GT-100

BOSS TU-2
Dunlop Cry Baby Classic
BOSS NS-2
VOX Joe Satriani Ice 9 OD Pedal
VOX Joe Satriani Time Machine Delay Pedal
Ernie Ball Strings
V Picks
#10
Quote by Roc8995
Unfortunately, the only proper way to go about this, if it is a real 60's vintage les paul, is to have a professional do all the work. It's going to be very fragile and very sensitive to being messed with.
The worst thing you could possibly do here is attempt an amateur fix; once you've done a hack job on an original instrument worth that much, there's no going back. I'd take it to a luthier and discuss your options from there. It won't be cheap, but it will be worth it, and the alternative is just tragic.


Oh god......He's going to destroy it even more.